The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1862-1864 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive

Note: The microfiche for 1862 is almost illegible

January 14th 1862

Edward Hardy and James Boyden were charged with assaulting Sarah Clarkson, servant of Mr Curtis of Whepstead. The complainant said that for a long time past these boys were in the habit of insulting her but never touched her till Sunday week when returning from church they stopped her, there were more than a dozen young men, they pulled her clothes up. The defendants were fined £2 each. The Bench said it was necessary to put a stop to such a nuisance and they hoped the young men of Whepstead would understand.

February 4th 1862

The railway line from Castle Hedingham to Yeldham is to be opened early in the summer.

February 18th 1862

Married on the 11th inst at Hastings----The Rev H.D.E.Bull, the son of the Rev Edward Bull, Rector of Pentlow, Essex, to Caroline Sarah the eldest daughter of the Rev H.S.Foyster, rector of All Saints Hastings.

June 17th 1862

To be sold at Court Farm, Glemsford. The household furniture, brewing and dairy equipment, hurdles and thatching stuff, the property of the late William Bigg on June 20th.

June 24th 1862

Died at Cavendish in his 80th year, Henry Stammers, carpenter and builder.

July 29th 1862

There was a church missionary meeting at Guestingthorpe which was attended by the farmers and principal people of the village also by the clergy of the large populous diocese. The address was by the Lord Bishop of Rochester and he was supported by the Rev's Hart of Guestingthorpe-Borton of Wickham St Pauls-Bull of Pentlow-Coleman of Clare-Carey of Henny-Gazeley of Yeldham-Way-Wilson-Ovens and Currey. The Rev Bull contrasted the state of heathen countries with England.

August 5th 1862

There was an inquest at the White Hart Inn at Melford on the body of John Whyard aged 17 years, the son of Mr Whyard, grocer of Thurston and in the employ of Mr Farrow, builder of Bury. It appears deceased who was employed in the company of Richard Mathoby a carpenter and working at Borley Rectory and with other lads had gone to bathe on the Tuesday preceeding, in a river adjacent to the rectory where he was at work, the river was deep and deceased was cautioned not to go beyond his depth, Mathoby having swum to the other side heard someone shout that the deceased would be drowned, he jumped in to the water and seized deceased by the hair but finding himself being dragged in and exhausted he was forced to let go to save his own life, help was obtained but life was extinct when he was dragged out. John Barber said he heard deceased say when he went into the water that he had the cramp. Accidental.

August 5th 1862

Clement Theobald, junior, of Melford was bound over for a breach of the peace at Melford.

August 19th 1862

Robert Smith of Clare, a troublesome disreputable fellow who is under a bond to keep the peace was charged with drunkedness at Glemsford, defendant pleaded guilty and was fined 5s with 6s 6d costs and if not paid to sit in the stocks for six hours.

August 19th 1862

Sale of estate at the Half Moon, Clare. The freehold estate of Monk's Risbridge and Barnardiston was sold by auction. The 1st lot offered comprised homestead and 194 acres was put up for £2500 but after spirited competition it was sold to Henry Teverson for £3450.

August 26th 1862

Rhona Ruse,Emily Ruse, Elizabeth Brown and Ann Bedford were convicted of stealing apples from Henry Syer of Kedington. Fined 1d each and costs.

The news in Britain in 1863

February 4th 1863

On Saturday morning at about 3-30, two constables named Smith and Ward were watching in a field behind the maltings at Melford when two men named William Jarrold and Thomas Ost of Melford came into the field. 
On seeing the constables they ran back, Ward sprang and collared them, before Smith could come to his aid Jarrold had a gun in his hand and pressed it at Ward's breast and threatened to shoot but constable snatched it out of his hand and knocked him down and took him into custody, the gun was examined and found to be loaded and on full cock.
 Jarrold who has a bad character has frequently sold malt at Sudbury but the police were unable to make out where he obtained it.

March 3rd 1863

Richard Kemp of Cavendish was charged with making threats to his wife, complainant is 29 years old and the defendant is an old man of 66 years.

March 3rd 1863

Sergeant Talbot of Lawshall was charged with poaching at Lawshall in Brick Hill Plantation, Charles Durrant said he ran away when he saw him, he had three dogs and a ferret with him, he said he drew the ferret out of a rat's hole. £2.

March 3rd 1863

During the winter several malsters in Melford have lost vast quantities of malt from their maltings but they could not discover the thief. It was found on inquiries that several innkeepers at Sudbury had purchased malt below market charges, this resulted in watch being kept on maltings in a field at the back of the maltings belonging to Messrs Ardley, Branwhite and Coe. Two police officers, Ward of Cornard and Smith of Melford were stationed in a field immediately behind a house occupied by a man named Jarrold, a baker and dealer. 
At between 1 and 2 a.m the constables saw two men come from Jarrold's house into the field, the men espied the two constables and ran away up Swan Lane but they seized Jarrold who immediately pressed a gun to the constable's head, P.C.Ward who is only a young man siezed the gun and took it from Jarrold, it was found to be fully loaded with powder and shot and capped, other man named Ost ran away dropping six sacks but he was apprehended in a Melford pub that evening. 
William Jarrold and Thomas Ost were charged with being on premises with intent to steal and being armed with a loaded gun. 
Committed to the next Assizes.

March 10th 1863

A fire broke out in a barley straw stack in a field at Bull Lane farm, Melford, on Thursday night, the property of Mathew Deeks, shortly after, two lads gave themselves up, they were John Scott of Barrow and John Clarry of Saxham. Inspector Schofield said the prisoners were ragged and half starved and had nothing to say. Committed.

March 12th 1863

Emma Ballard of Cavendish was charged with absenting herself from the service if Mr Churchyard a horsehair manufacturer of Cavendish, she being under an aggreement to weave horsehair for 7 years.
Mr Churchyard said she was lazy and as the straw plaiting trade was favourable the weavers tried to leave the weaving. Dismissed.

March 17th 1863

Walter Drake, who was charged with stealing a donkey and cart at Melford, made his escape from the County gaol at Bury, having broken his chain he made his way to the coal cellar and by raising the trap got into the street, there is little doubt he will soon be captured.

March 26th 1863

We regret to say that the first son of William Lillie of Sudbury lost his life in the wreck of the Anglo Saxon on th 27th last. He was on his way to join his brother in America.

March 26th 1863

Part of the Wood Hall estate at Sudbury is to be sold.
The part near Back Lane and Melford Road to be sold in small portions for building. A road is to be staked out on a line from Lavenham road across Dobbs Hole field and the Wents in a straight direction to Melford road past the Folly and a second road at right angles fron Melford road to Woodhall in the same direction as Went's path.

March 26th 1863

A fire broke out in three tenements at Upper Tye, Cornard, adjoining the premises of Mr O.Brand.

March 17th 1863

Celebrations of the Prince of Wales wedding. No parish in England could have shown a more spontaneous burst of loyalty at the event than Cavendish, arches, banners and flags were among tastily decorated houses with those of Mr Garret, Doctor Waring, Mr Bocock, Mr Avey and Mr Harn being outstanding. Shortly before daybreak the inhabitants were woken by several batteries of the village cannon which consists of blacksmith's anvils rifled from the forges and charged with powder, bells rang out merrily all day, donkey races were run and children's sports. The oldest man and the oldest woman planted on the village green, inside some handsome railings, an oak tree which was named the "Albert and Alexandria Oak".

March 27th 1863

At Suffolk Assizes, Jarrold and Ost were sentenced to three years penal servitude for stealing malt from the maltings at Melford and assaulting the police contables. Edwin Christee Malden an innkeeper at Ballingdon said Jarrold came into my house to sell some malt, he bought six coombs for 7L.

March 27th 1863

Fire broke out at Fish House farm, Bures,(doubtless the work of an incendiary) occupied by Mr Charles Boggis, it consumed a wheat stack worth 125L.

March 31st 1863

George Jackman was charged with slaying and killing Samuel Sparrow at Newton on the 5th of September 1862
John Rolfe said 
'I am a labourer of Newton and that night went with the deceased to the Shoulder of Mutton Inn for some meat, we got there a little before 10 and left before 12, we had a pot of beer each and the landlord gave us one.
As we were going home we saw two men fighting, we took no part in it.
Samuel Sparrow said to Jackman " George, I would not let a one-eyed man fight", Jackman immediately knocked Spooner down, I said," you should not have hit him as he would not hurt a worm", the prisoner said he was sorry for it but he had hit the wrong man '

The prisoner helped to carry Sparrow home but he died a week later, he also did some of the deceased's work while he was ill and had given his widow 10s. 
Mr Mason a surgeon from Sudbury said that deceased had died from inflamation of the brain caused by his head hitting the ground there was no other sign of a blow. The jury found him guilty but recommended mercy. 
1 week imprisonment.

April 7th 1863

Ebenezer Hemstead a labourer from Liston was charged with committing an assault on James Seaber a letter carrier and shoemaker of Borley who is engaged in the Alpheton and Melford deliveries. 
It appears that defendant lives at Liston with his mother in law, Mrs Downing, and the latter asked Seaber to bring a parcel from Melford, he did so and when he was leaving the house after lighting his pipe at her fire when the defendant who is labouring under feelings of jealously with respect of his wife for which there does not seem to be any foundations though complainant admitted that she asked him to go to Halstead Fair with her. 
Hemstead committed an assault on complainant by striking him and knocking him down and kicking him and causing him to spit blood. Committed to Chelmsford Gaol for two months.

April 14th 1863

Three boys, George Cooper, Abraham Grist and Walter Grist were summoned with firing a cannon loaded with stones in the street in Melford. As the parents consented to them being flogged by the police no convictions were recorded against the boys.

April 14th 1863

On Tuesday the Sunday school children at Glemsford had a treat, the new school room was decorated by Mr William Byford, at 2 pm there was a perambulation round the village with music and banners, about 140 sat down to a roast and a boiling, there was plenty to spare so that many poor old soul was comforted by the fragments that remained, the Rev G.Coldham addressed the children giving each a little book relative to the recent Royal Marriage which the fete was meant to celebrate.

April 28th 1863

Frederick Snell of Glemsford was charged with stealing a coat, the property of Walter Humphry of Hartest. The prisoner was coming to Bury to attend Militia drill and stopped at a public house in Hartest where the prosecutor was playing ten pins and stole the coat from the bowling green, he pawned it at Miss List's. 
Remanded.

April 28th 1863

On Tuesday the 21st, a man of upwards of 70 years was brought to the Union House in Sudbury in a semi drunken state, he was attended by a surgeon but died the same evening, it is rumoured that deceased had drunk in several places in Melford and that some men had put a dose of Jalop in his beer which so severely purged the old man that he died.
At a meeting of the Guardians on Thursday the case was investigated and the rumour proved incorrect, he had been drinking several days and lay exposed to cold and heat in a lane near a kiln and that was the cause of death.

May 5th 1863

On Monday the 27th, Ephraim Crick, a journeyman plumber and glazier of Wickhambrook went to the church in Wickhambrook which is undergoing repairs to see the foreman hoping for a few days employment
After waiting till three in the afternoon he went in the company of a labourer to the top of the tower, he asked the labourer for some rope saying he would show him how to descend into the churchyard, he secured the rope at the top and started to descend, he surprised the labourer that he had descended so quickly and when he got to the bottom he asked him if he was alright as his hands were bleeding profusely. He was taken to the White Horse Inn where it was found two bones in one leg were broken. 
He was carried home to his wife and children to lament his foolishness.

May 12th 1863

On Saturday a young man named Mathew Marriot of Tostock in the employ of Mr Golding of Tostock was oiling the threshing machine while it was still in motion on the premises of Mr Bird at Beyton when his hand got caught in the strap and three fingers were badly injured.

May 12th 1863

On Friday the Board of Guardians of Sudbury Union entertained their chairman the Rev Edward Bull and the vice chairman Mr C.H.Branwhite to dinner at the Four Swans in Sudbury, compliments were paid and toasts were drunk to the Prince and Princess of Wales.

May 12th 1863

The railway from Chappel to Haverhill having opened yesterday hope to run five trains each way every week day.

May 17th 1863

From the Halifax Guardian.------At Kirkheaton during Saturday night some children sleeping in a room were savagely attacked by rats, the parents were awakened by the screaming of a child who declared the other one was biting him, on turning down the bed clothes four large rats jumped out, no fewer than twelve being in the room, all three children were severely bitten on their heads, arms and hands.

May 17th 1863

News from America leaves little doubt in the minds of Englishmen that another war of slaughter has terminated with the retreat of another Federal army across the Rappahannock and the disgrace not of General Mc,Clellan but of "Fighting Joe Hooker" the most warlike Unionist.

May 17th 1863

This morning, Mr Quaife, the head clerk to Mr Allen of Ballingdon destroyed himself at 1 o' clock in the morning, he requested his wife to extinguish the light in the room, she dozed off, when waking about half an hour later she heard the door slam, she went out but lost sight of deceased who had reached Ballingdon Bridge from which he precipitated himself, she gave the alarm and the river was dragged, he was found after about two hours.

May 17th 1863

Action at Sudbury County Court was brought by Mr T. Sparrow against John Mott for breach of warranty concerning a horse which the claimant had bought from Mott but it turned out lame, both are from Otten Belchamp. Judgement for amount claimed of £3 and £5 15s.

May 17th 1863

A Private named Smith of the 5th Fuseliers at Colchester camp was "drummed out". The fellow had for some time been in hospital with rigidity of the knee, the medical officer believed he was feigning, Chloroform was administered and the knee instantly and easily bent.

May 17th 1863

James Loveday of Lt Wratting was charged with releasing a donkey from the pound. To stand over for further evidence.

May 26th 1863

Died in Tasmania aged 47-----Henry the 4th son of the Rev C. Pyke of Baythorne End Park and vicar of Wickhambrook.

May 26th 1863

Died at Belchamp St Pauls-Mary, wife of the late John Jonas of West Wickham, Cambridgeshire, aged 47 years.

June 2nd 1863

There was an inquest at Sudbury on the body of William Olive aged 60 who met his death under the following circumstances.
Deceased was an ostler at the Rose public house for the last 4 years, on the previous Saturday night he was the worse for liquor and on going up the ladder to his bed chamber in the back yard he lost his footing and fell 13 ft. Death caused by injury to his brain while falling.

June 9th 1863

A coal porter named Harrison of Sudbury with being drunk and incapable at Bury by p c. Suttle, he was discharged on promising to leave Bury and take better care of himself.

June 9th 1863

Inquest at the Horn Inn at Sudbury on Mrs Lavinia Roberts, wife of the assistant master of Sudbury grammar school who shot herself through the forehead with a pistol which contained two balls.

June 16th 1863

For sale-the entire herd of Shorthorn cattle by orders of the executors of the late Jonas Webb at Babraham. 60 to 70 cows. The herd has won many medals at the Royal Show.

June 23rd 1863

A serious accident happened to David Scarfe the police constable of Bulmer. He had attended the Hedingham Sessions and rode as far as Gestingthorpe Compasses where he was standing leaning on the shafts of the cart when the horse suddenly plunged forward knocking him down and the wheel passed over his head breaking his jaw in two places and his arm. He now lies in a precarious situation.

June 23rd 1863

Barnabus Brockwell of Glemsford was charged with ill treating a donkey belonging to Samuel Evans of Cavendish, a carter. It appears the donkey was turned out on to the Cavendish road to feed and was found next morning with its tongue nearly pulled out by the roots.
Mrs Prigg who lives beside the road said she saw defendant that night beating a white donkey with a stick. Dismissed.

June 23rd 1863

Died on the 19th inst aged 77 years, Joseph Deeks, one of the bretheren of Melford hospital and survivor of the memorable battle of Trafalgar.

June 23rd 1863

A little boy named John Smith was charged with assaulting Emily Frost of Flempton by throwing stones at her as she was being driven to school at Bury, the bench said it must be stopped as the practice was very prevalent and ordered the boy to have a taste of the birch rod at the hands of the police.

July 2nd 1863

There was an inquest at Sudbury Bull Hotel on the body of Edmund Tiffin aged 9.
 It appears that about six in the morning deceased accompanied his father to Brundon Hall where he work for Mr Daniels of Brundon Hall. After fetching a pail of water for his father to water the horse, he went fishing, after about half an hour his father called him but he did not receive a reply. After searching for him he found his body at the back of Brundon Hall where he had been fishing in 4ft or 5ft of water still with his fishing rod in his hand. 
Accidental Death by drowning.

July 7th 1863

A brief account of the charge against the curate of Oulton we recently published was brought by a girl of 14 years who had been adopted into his own family. After hearing the case with closed doors in compliance with the wishes of the Rev gentleman the magistrates decided to drop the case.

July 28th 1863

Inquest on William Orpen of Slough farm, Acton, who hung himself with a plough cord. It was his habit to dine at 12 but that day he did not appear, the servant girl getting alarmed found him hanging in the cart shed. Lydia Rose and another farm servant cut him down. 
Unsound mind.

August 4th 1863

On Wednesday afternoon an old man named Marmaduke Townsend was harvesting with two young men at Bradfield St George, when they left off work for "fours" during which the young men started "larking", Townsend started to return to work when one of the young men named Raynham jumped on his back which caused him to fall backwards with his right leg under him causing him a dislocated ankle.

August 4tth 1863

Three men, named Hurrel, Hardy and Pearson were charged with being drunk in Whepstead. Fined 5s each with 4s costs.

August 4th 1863

The annual sale and letting of Mr Sexton's rams and lambs took place at Wherstead Park on the picturesque eminence commanding a beautiful view over the river Orwell. Letting of 30 shearlings rams was 5 guineas to 9 ½ guineas.

August 4th 1863

Inquest at Hawkedon Queens Arms on Alfred Middleditch aged 44. Cornelius Porter said he was working with deceased at a saw pit, sawing timber, Porter said he was on top and was looking in the pit when deceased suddenly fell backwards, on jumping into the pit he found his face quite black and he was dead. Natural death.

August 11th 1863

For sale at Cavendish-The Moors Farm-35 acres 3 rods 27 perches. In a good corn growing district. To be sold in September.

August 11th 1863

Inquest at the Lion Inn, Alpheton on Thomas Sutton a labourer aged 40 years who met his death in the following circumstances.
Robert Cooper, steward for Mr Byford of Shimpling said deceased was at work in the harvest field on Saturday last which was the first day of harvest, the men having had some beer which they paid for themselves, according to custom on the first day of harvest they "shoe the colts", there were nine men besides Sutton and he had seven colts with him who had paid one shilling each which they spent on drink. 
About 8-30 in the evening they were larking about in the field and singing and drinking. Sutton pulled young Oakley down and said they would shoe him, that is hammer at the bottom of the shoe. They pulled one another about a bit but no angry words were exchanged,
 'I did not join them until eight at night and they were perfectly sober, none were too drunk to attend work. After Oakley and Sutton had been spreeing about, Sutton sang a song and about in a quarter of an hour he was found in the wheat complaining of pain and said some-one had kicked him but did not know who. I sent him home in a tumbril. Sutton and Oakley had been on the ground rolling on another over two or three times'
.
 Mr Jones, surgeon, said he saw deceased on Saturday night, he said he had great tenderness about his body, he said he had been kicked but did not know by who as they were all larking about together, he was not sober, he died on Monday morning. The post mortem showed he died from a rupture of the large intestine. Witness Cooper was called back, he said there was no rolling about after Sutton sang his song and he made no complaints whatever. 
Verdict in accordance of medical evidence.

August 11th 1863

On Saturday last as William Clarke, 70, was engaged in stacking wheat on the farm of Mr Ray at Higham, he fell from the stack and receive injuries from which he died before he was admitted to Bury hospital.

August 11th 1863

William Lilley, labourer of Clare pleaded guilty to stealing a tin bottle from William Gosling of Clare. As it was his first offence, 3 months prison.

August 11th 1863

To be sold at the "Munt", Walter Belchamp-the live and dead stock and of adjoining farms of the Rev J.M.St Clere Raymond who has let the farms.

August 18th 1863

Moors Farm, Cavendish for sale. 35 acres, a dwelling house and out buildings, in a well preserved game district.

August 25th 1863

Messrs Newson and Sexton will sell by auction the live and dead stock at Bully Green, Poslingford, the property of Mr Boreham whose lease expires.

August 25th 1863

Died on the 21st of May at Pooramble, India in his 31st year-C.B.Clarke, Staff Sergeant of the Royal Artillery and son of Mr C. Clarke, miller of Bricet, Suffolk.

August 25th 1863

There was a fatal accident at Chevley Park on Friday last when a young man named Charles Gillson aged 21 years and in the employ of Mr Samuel Gent of Park Farm, by foolishly riding on the shafts of a waggon fell under the wheels of the waggon, a dangerous habit frequently indulged in by labourers.

August 25th 1863

At Clare Petty Sessions Annual Licencing Day all the old licences were renewed and four fresh licences were granted, viz-Dukes Head beerhouse at Withersfield---The Bells and Red House at Stoke-Waggon and Horses at Clare.

August 25th 1863

A frightful accident occurred on Thursday afternoon at the little village of Charsfield near Wickham Market owing to the explosion of the boiler of a portable steam engine which was engaged at work on a offhand farm in the occupation of Mr Walter Burch of Campsea Ashe, it was followed by a destructive fire on the farm premises.
It seems Mr Burch had engaged the steam threshing machine which belongs to Mr Whitmore of Petistree to thresh wheat. It was working well through Wednesday and Thursday until the accident, Threshing was being carried out in a small meadow close to a big meadow which was divided from the highroad by a narrow strip of garden ground. 
Shortly before five in the afternoon the men got back to work after "fours" when the boiler burst with a tremendous report, the engine was carried forward with tremendous force, a distance of 14 yards and came in contact with the threshing machine, setting fire to the machine, the straw stack and the unthreshed wheat by burning coals being scattered.
Unfortunately the driver, Nathaniel Licence and a 14 year old lad named Ephraim Battle were carried with the engine which stopped by the threshing machine and fell upon the bodies of both who were probably killed instantly, a labourer named Samuel Denny was knocked down and was immediately surrounded by flames, he was pulled out at once but was found quite dead. 
It is stated the poor fellow Licence leaves a wife and nine children, Denny leaves a wife and three children, Battle was only 14 years old. The inquest was held at Horse Shoes, Charsfield but adjourned.

September 1st 1863

The inquest was resumed in the schoolroom at Charsfield on the bodies of three men killed by the explosion of a boiler at Charsfield. Verdict--- the deaths were by an explosion which originated from over pressure of steam owing to the neglect of the driver. 
The body of Samuel Denny was buried on Sunday afternoon in Charsfield churchyard, the burial was attended by nearly the entire population of the village. The boy Battle was buried at Campsea Ashe on Tuesday and the remains of driver Licence were buried at Wickham Market. 
Walter Burch who was severely injured is much better, the injuries to Mr Ephraim Battle, father of the boy killed, are also recovering. 

September 1st 1863

For sale the live and dead stock upon Mill Hill Farm, Glemsford, about 300 acres which J.E.Hale has let.

September 1st 1863

Died at Guelph, Canada West---James Wright, one of the early settlers of this part of the colony and brother of Reuben Wright of Bury.. He was born in Dennington, Suffolk in 1798, being 65 when he died. He went to Laxfield with his father and emigrated to Canada in 1837 with his wife and 8 children, he settled on a farm and resided there till he died.

September 1st 1863

A large party of upwards of 90 persons, workmen of Mr Nunn's assembled at the Griffin Inn at Ingham to a substantial dinner to celebrate the in gathering of harvest.

September 1st 1863

Albert Underwood of Cavendish was fined 1s and 13s 6d costs for throwing a hook at Major Hinchcliffe's dog and wounding it while he was cutting beans.

September 1st 1863

There was a shocking accident at Sudbury where a tradesman of Sudbury lost his life. Mr Ginn, carpenter was being driven in his horse and tumbril by a lad along Cornard road on Saturday evening, Mr Ginn had gone with his gun and dogs intending to have some sport by shooting moor fowl on the river, having crossed the railway line near Lt Cornard.
Leaving the tumbril, he got over the gate but being deaf did not hear the down luggage train which was proceeding to Sudbury, the driver saw him and whistled loudly but to no avail, the buffers struck him on the head. 
Accident with no blame to the driver of the engine.

September 8th 1863

Died-in Philadelphia U.S.A., James Byford the second on of the late Robert Spencer? of Hartest, Suffolk.

September 8th 1863

Died--- on the 10th ult at St Helens Island, Montreal, accidentally drowned. William Levett of the 4th battalion of the 60th Royal Rifles, the second son of William Levett of Bury, Suffolk.

September 15th 1863

Sale at Mill Hill farm, Glemsford, the live and dead stock on of Mr J.E.Hale. 15 horses-3 superb 2 and 3 year olds-I chestnut cob-230 black faced ewes and wethers-30 swine-carriage-hand tools-requisites for 300 acres. On September 29th.

September 15th 1863

Live and dead stock at the Munt Farm, Walter Belchamp--- 17 horses-12 Suffolk cows-16 heifers and steers-100 black faced lambs -90 swine-2 stacks of capital hay-usual implements with Champion Reaping Machine.

September 22nd 1863

At Sudbury Petty Sessions. William Scott was summoned for breaking and act of Parliament by removing night soil after the hour of 5 in the morning. The case was proved by the police and he was fined 12s and 6d as he was convicted of a like offence in November last.

September 22nd 1863

To be sold by auction on the instructions of J.E.Hale who has let the farm at Mill Hill, Glemsford, the live and dead stock. 15 mares and geldings-3 two year old colts-chestnut gelding cob- 220 blackface ewes and wethers-30 swine-5 road and harvest waggons-8 full sized tumbrils-8 Downs and other ploughs-3 scarifiers-rolls drills etc.-3 turnip cutters-horse powered chaff cutter. Upon New Street farm, Glemsford.

September 29th 1863

Four splendid working Devon oxen for sale at the Leys, Attleborough on October 1st, they are well adapted for ploughing heavy land.

September 29th 1863

William Goodall, miller of Clare and Charles Farnsworth of Ashen, Essex, a dealer, were charged with stealing 12 stones of wheat from Charles Ray, miller of Clare. Charles Ray deposed,'I was sent for into the market by my man, James Deeks, and shown a sack which was mine, I went to my mill and saw my servant William Goodall, I went through the books with him and found no record of meal sold to the prisoner, I gave prisoner Goodall into custody.'

September 27th 1863

The Melford Yeomanry Cavalry shooting match took place at Boxted among members of the Melford Squadron of Cavalry for four prizes on Mr Eagle's farm. After the contest, five silver tankards were presented by Major Barnardiston. -1st, Private Fenner of Clare who scored eight points and five hits-2nd was Private Mead of Lawshall with seven points and five hits-the third prize of a cup presented by Capt Ord for the greatest number of hits, there were several ties and on them being shot off for, Private Thomas Brand of Pentlow made a bull's eye so taking Capt Ord's cup. 
The men then proceeded to Boxted Hall, the ancient mansion of Capt W. Poley where a superb collation with wines was laid out in the fine old Hall.


Thomas Brand's cup

Note: Captain Orde's cup still exists, proudly owned by a descendant of Thomas Brand. It is inscribed
Presented to
Thomas Parkis Brand
Private in the Long Melford Troop
of
Suffolk Yeo. Cavalry
By his captain
John Thomas Ord
for the greatest number of hits
at target practice
17th Sep 1863

September 29th 1863

A sad occasion occurred at Lavenham on Tuesday on the farm of Mr W.Mumford a farmer and brickmaker of Hill House farm when a man named George Ellis in the employ of Mr Boby of Bury lost his life and a fellow worker had a narrow escape while attempting to rescue him.
Mr Mumford said Mr Boby was fixing horse works to work the pump at the brickyard and he saw deceased go down the well shaft to about 14ft and I saw him breathing hard, Jude another of Mr Boby's men went down the well and got a rope round deceased's arm then I saw him much affected by the foul air, we got him up but it was another two hours before we got deceased up. Accidental suffocation.

September 29th 1863

Thomas Turner, R.Cattawell and James Felton labourers of Walter Belchamp were charged with stealing 7 bushels of wheat from Mr Thomas Hart their employer. Mr Hart said the men had been in his employ for some time and he suspected them of stealing wheat. He hid himself in some straw near his house and kept watch, at about 11-30 he saw the prisoners enter the field and one watched my door and the other two filled the sacks or bags.
Next morning he informed the police and they traced the foot marks throught the fields to Gestingthorpe to a farm in the occupation of Mr Joseph Firmin. A man named Brown has been charged with receiving. Committed for trial.

October 4th 1863

James Payne will sell by auction at the Greyhound Inn, Wickhambrook. A clever 5 year old Hackney, quiet to drive and ride- nearly new Oxford cart with patent axle-set of well made silver mounted gig harness-70 blackfaced lambs-8 good shoats-100 larch poles-quantity of oak, elm and poplar boards-several good beer casks of 18, 13, 9 and 5 gallons-quantity of carpenters tools and household furniture the property of Mr James Brown who is declining innkeeping.

October 4th 1863

On Saturday one of the children of the Rev Pentley of Alpha Villas, Melford Road, who were playing in the " Wents", one of them fell into a pit 20ft deep. The other children gave the alarm and some men who were working nearby on the new road let down a rope to rescue him. The late sale of the " Wents" and other fields for making the new road have resulted in a number of gravel and stone pits being dug as trial holes, they should be protected.

October 13th 1863

Charles Clark was charged with stealing an axe, the property of the new railway company. The prisoner was apprehended at New England, Essex, the prisoner said he sold it for 1s 6d. Committed to Bury gaol for 6 weeks hard labour.

October 13th 1863

Married at Trinity Church, Cloudsley Square, Islington----John the firth son of the late Samuel Death of Alpheton Hall to Matilda Firmin, widow of the late G. Whitfield King of Ovington Hall, Essex and eldest daughter of William Whitlock of Ridgewell in Essex.

October 13th 1863

At Suffolk Michaelmas Sessions no true bill was found against William Banks for stealing a shirt from the Rev Dobree of Cockfield.

October 13th 1863

Thomas Lock of Wiston was charged with shooting a rabbit on the land of Mr Thornton of Assington. Fined 16s with 6s 6d costs and with default 14 days prison.

October 13th 1863

Charles Hines, aged 13 years, of Nayland was charged with stealing 4 ½ d from a little girl aged 7 years named Cardy. To be whipped and discharged.

October 20th 1863

Wednesday, October 14th 1863, ought long to be remembered by the poor of the village of Cavendish. Until that day the education of the lower classes of the parish, which numbers 1300 souls would have been totally neglected had not the benevolence of the Yellowly family of Cavendish Hall organised and supported and for thirty years and watched over with unremitting kindness, a superior dames school, which saved many of the children of the poor from utter idleness and uncared for ignorance. 
However when the present rector, the Rev R.G.Peter came into the parish some 3½ years ago, the necessity of at once founding a National school for the education of the poor was apparent. Two years ago a reading room and lending library was opened but owing to the lack of reading and writing not enough support was found for it. Another dames school was opened in addition to the one mentioned but was unable to keep pace with the demand for education.
Accordingly in January last year the first stone of the new National school was laid and several contributions were received from the parishioners. Mr Stammers of Cavendish was the builder and the architect was Mr Johnson of Bury. The building stands on the village green and consists of a spacious room 54ft by 18ft flanked on one side by a class room of 15ft by 14ft. The school Mistresses's house forming the sister gable to the class room consists of a parlour, kitchen and three bedrooms. The whole is of red brick and slated. 
The school is well situated for all parts of the village at a good and healthy airy elevation and a short distance from the church and the new rectory which is rapidly rising on the higher ground behind the school. The school is opened, a suitable rectory is now being built and there is but one serious blot on the village and that is the is the unworthy state of God's church in the midst of it with its rickety and unsightly pews.

October 27th 1863

A sad occasion occurred at Stoke by Nayland on Friday last. Sir Hugh Nugent, a pupil of Mr Wordwell's of Giffords Hall meeting with his death by a gun accident. It seems deceased who was only 19 years old, went out with another of Mr Wordwell's pupils (a Spaniard named Jourequili) the former passed his gun to his friend when crossing a ditch and holding it by the muzzle when one of the barrels exploded, the charge entering his side and inflicting a mortal wound. 
Accidental Death.

October 27th 1863

Charles Farnsworth and William Goodall for stealing a quantity of meal from Charles Ray at Clare. 6 months.

November 3rd 1863

At the meeting of Lavenham Farmers Club the annual ploughing match was held. Prize winners were---Sheep shearing champion to George Everett for Mr Hawkins of Milden---Best ploughman to Samuel Faires-1st in class- Joseph Day for Mr Byford of Melford, £1 10s---2nd George Day for Mr Avers of Lavenham-3rd, George Faires for Mr Scott of Lavenham.-Best plough boy-Samuel Faires for Mr Bigg of Lavenham, £1-2nd---William Pryke for Mr Hodson of Lt Waldingfield , 15s.---For longest servitude-James Creasy employed by Mr Mumford of Lavenham, 12 years - £1 1s-Longest serving horseman-William Bradley for Mr Ruffell of Cockfield, 35 years £1 10s---2nd - William Levett for Mr Groom of Preston -24 ½ years. Agricultural labourer-Thomas Bruce for Mr Bigg, 46 years, £1 10s-2nd James Allerton for Mr Rollinson of Stanningfield, £1 5s-female servant, Susan Bulmer for Mrs Turner of Lavenham. President's prize for longest subscriber to Benefit Society-William Duce of Melford for Mr Baker 24 years, £1 10s. Workman who brought up most children with the least parish relief-Charles Partridge for Mr Vince with 10 children, £1 10s.

November 10th 1863

Inquest at Melford on Lydia Smith aged 76 years who fell down dead in the street of diseased heart. Her landlord had been speaking of raising her rent but he said he was only joking, however she thought it was in earnest and became excited.

November 10th 1863

Henry Mays and William Chambers of Cavendish were summoned for riding without reins in two tumbrels. !s with 6s 6d costs, For like offence, James Chattis of Pentlow for driving four horses on the turnpike road at Melford. 5s and 9s 6d costs.

November 10th 1863

Bury Corn Market---Wheat 40s 5 ½ d-Barley 34s 9 ½d -Oats 21s 1d. per quarter. Fat beasts-to 9s per stone-Sheep-- Hoggets to 42s-Ewes to 45s.

November 24th 1863

James Wood, a native of Hartest, who gave himself up a few days ago alleging he was the man who set fire to the buildings at Place farm in Hartest on the 8th of April 1843 when all the buildings were burnt down. He has been discharged from custody and handed over for trial by Court Martial at Aldershot, being a Private in the 59th Foot into which he enlisted shortly after the fire. At the time in question, Place farm was the property of Mr George Weller Poley and in the tenure of Mr J. Harvey. At the time of the trial in 1843 of a man named Smith of Hartest, Wood swore he saw Smith fire the premises but Smith was discharged.

November 24th 1863

James Mortlock, a ragged boy from Glemsford was found guilty of stealing a tame rabbit from Thomas Brown of Glemsford. 2 months hard labour.

November 24th 1863

James Chattis of Pentlow was summoned for riding on a waggon drawn by four horses on the turnpike road at Melford. 5s with 8s 6d costs.

December 1st 1863

Died on the 20th ult, aged 13 years, Elizabeth, the youngest daughter of Thomas Ruse, corn and seed merchant of Sudbury.

December 1st 1863

At Belchamp Walter-for sale underwood at Northey wood at the Bells Inn, Walter Belchamp by directions of the Rev J,M. St Cl;ere Raymond, about 12 acres of capital underwood in lots of two acres on December 4th.

December 8th 1863

Henry Johnson, innkeeper of Melford was summoned by Inspector Ginn who deposed that on Saturday night at about 11 o'clock he saw two men stript and fighting in his house, I asked defendant if he wanted any help, he said " no I like to see it". Defendant said he would not let it happen again but it had been a railway contractor who had had a great deal of quarrelling with his men. Fined 2L with 5s 6d costs.

December 8th 1863

Arthur Manby aged 14 of Gt Cornard was summoned for cruelty to a ewe sheep, the property of Thomas Fitch, junior of Newton. George Carter said 'I work for Mr Fitch, on Monday night last I heard a noise of bells from the sheepyard, I went to the yard and saw Manby behind a ewe, he was holding the sheep by the wool on both sides, I made him come from the yard'. 
The following morning, Arthur Brunning aged 14, said 
'I work for Mr Fitch, I drove the sheep out of the yard at 8 in the morning and found a stick now produced sticking out of the body of a ewe, I pulled it out, it was 20 inches long, I went with my brother to Manby,s house, he lives nearby the yard, Manby said "I was in the farm all alone and I gave one of the sheep a rare doing and had a rare spree with the sheep", he said he was trying to ride on the sheep's back, the sheep was in a bad state, I had it killed.' 
2 months hard labour.

December 8th 1863

David Basham, in the employ of Mr Leech off Shipley Abbey, Poslingford was charged with driving four horses and a wagon on a certain highway called Pages Hill. p.c. Mathew said 'I was on duty at Whepstead and saw defendant come from Bury standing on the shafts of the wagon, when he got to the top of Page's Hill, he slashed his horses and drove as fast as he could'. 
His master gave him a good character and said perhaps a kick from a horse had started them off as he had a colt in front. 10s with 9s costs.

December 15th 1863

Died at Clare in her 78th year, Elizabeth, relic of the late Samuel Viall of Foxearth.

December 15th 1863

Died at Sudbury, Thomas Ruse aged 50 years, corn and seed merchant of Sudbury.

December 2nd 1863

On Friday last an old woman aged 60 years, named Argent from Cavendish, met her death in an unusual distressing manner, she was taken with a fit while sitting by the fire into which she fell with her head resting on the live coals where she lay until her husband came home and found her, her face and head were dreadfully burnt and was unrecognisable.

December 15th 1863

On Monday evening two men were engaged in work on the railway line, undermining some earth in Mill field Clare when the chalk in a sand gault gave way and both men were buried beneath it. The men were dug out but Wells from Cavendish was found to be dead and the other man from Balsham much injured. Deceased was 18 years of age and only set on in the morning.

December 22nd 1863

Hannah Wells from Glemsford was charged with throwing stones and gravel at Frederick Clarke who said
 'I am a farmer at Glemsford. On Friday the 17th of October I was riding my horse to one of my fields, I met defendant coming along the road between Cavendish and Glemsford, she had a child in her arms, I said "well Popsey", she stopped and picked up a handful of dirt and gravel and threw it at me, I gave her no provocation, each time she sees me she abuses me.' 
Mr Cardinall said defendant had a bastard child which she said was Clarke's and constantly annoyed him, defendant asked complainant for money for the child which was about four months old, he said "not till you swear by it". 
Fined 20 shillings and 7s 6d costs or 21 days. She said she would get a summons and would swear the child to complainant.

December 22nd 1863

On Friday afternoon an old lady named Argent from Glemsford the wife of a labourer and aged 60 years met her death by burning. She suffered from fits and had one and fell into the fire and was dreadfully burnt.

December 2nd 1863

Inquest at Elmswell on Charles Mulley aged 1 year 9 months. Mary Mulley said she was the wife of John Mulley, bricklayer, she dressed the child on Sunday morning and set him down, she went to the pantry and when she got back he had the kettle to his mouth, he ran away crying, she carried him to Mr Bury at Woolpit but the child died the next morning. Death from drinking hot water.

December 29th 1863

Another death from drinking out of a kettle at Elmswell. There was an inquest at the Lion Inn at Elmswell on William Sayer aged 3 ½ years. Lucy, wife of William Sayer, bricklayer, said 
'Last Monday after sitting with my back to the fire cutting out a dress, I heard the child make a little noise, I turned round, he had his hand to his mouth, I gave him some cold water and white places came on his lips, I never saw one of my 12 children drinking from a kettle before, I suppose the children had been talking about the child that killed itself ten days before, I took him to Mr Leech at Woolpit immediately.' 
Death from drinking hot water from a kettle.

December 29th 1863

Inquest at Boxted on Elizabeth Maxim aged 29 years, wife of Jacob Maxim a groom at Boxted Hall, she had for sometime been suffering from vomiting. George King, surgeon, said she had a diseased liver of long standing.

  The news in Britain in 1864

January 5th 1864

At a previous Sudbury Town council meeting it had been agreed that 5L should be spent on the Croft bridge but Mr Spurgeon complained that the ranger had shown him a bill for 16L, the bill was from Sillitoe, Mr Grimwoods man, and was legal, he would not sanction it in any way and was the greatest piece of jobbery he had ever seen as Mr Grimwood was on the committee and had employed his own man this was a case for investigation.

January 12th 1864

Thomas Berry of the Weavers beerhouse, Stour Street, Sudbury, was charged with keeping his house open after 11 at night. Dismissed.

February 2nd 1864

Charles Moss Orbell, a farmer of Brook Hall, Foxearth, was charged with being drunk and riotous in Cross Street, Sudbury, in the early hours of the 15th. On several previous occasions he has been charged with being drunk and disorderly.
Superintentent Sachs and Sgt Chambers said they saw defendant knocking on the door of a house beside the Bull Inn in Church Street in the early hours of the morning, they told him it was a private house but he carried on. He was very drunk and on passing through Ballingdon he went to a house where many young people were at a party, the young ladies were very much frightened and sent for the police. The magistrates said they would have committed him to prison but as his mother wsas very ill he would be fined 50s.

March 15th 1864

THE HEDINGHAM WITCHCRAFT CASE Mr Fowke a private gentleman from Sible Hedingham and one of the Guardians of the Poor of that parish brought the case against Emma Smith the wife of a beer house keeper of Ridgewell and Samuel Stammers, a carpenter of Sible Hedingham, charging them with causing the death of an old man called " Dummy" under the following circunstances. Dummy who was deaf and dumb and about 80 years of age had lived in a small mud hut near Sible Hedingham for the last 8 years and had been known in the neighbourhood for about 20 years, but his name and place of birth or his country were never known although he was generally supposed to be a Frenchman. His habits were peculiar and his inability to express himself otherwise than by grotesque gestures and was also very excitable caused him to be regarded by many as possessed of the power of witchcraft. He was in the habit of travelling about the nearby villages gaining his livelihood by telling fortunes and was often consulted by youg people on the locality as to their love affairs. He usually wore two or three coats the number of which he increased according to the heat of the weather and two or three hats of different descriptions at the same time and was always accompanied by three or four small dogs. He seems to have been an inoffensive old man and was treated with great kindness by the good families of the neighbourhood and as a source of merriment by the youthful and the idle. Among the places the old man went to was the village of Ridgewell, a few miles distance of Hedingham and there he made the aquaintance of the prisoner Smith, at the beerhouse of her husband.
On the occasion of one of these trips to Ridgewell, the poor old man wanted to sleep at the prisoner's house and on her refusing he stroked his stick and used other threatening signs to signify his displeasure at her refusal. Soon after this the prisoner Emma Smith became ill and was reduced to a low nervous condition and at once expressed her conviction that she had beeb bewitched by poor old Dummy and that she would not recover until she had induced him to remove the spell from her.
She made several applications to him without effect and at last while labouring under great mental and nervous excitement she went from her home at Ridgewell to Sible Hedingham on the evening of the 3rd of August.1863, and she met old Dummy at the Swan public house about a quarter of a mile from Dummy's hut. They remained there for some time, she endeavouring to persuade him to go to Ridgewell with her and to sleep at her house and offering him three sovereigns to do so. Dummy however refused to do so and drew his fingers across his throat implying that he was afraid of having his throat cut. As soon as it became known that a woman from Ridgewell who had been bewitched by old Dummy was at the Swan, a great number of villagers flocked to see her and the Swan soon became a scene of riot and confusion and the old man was pulled and danced about, falling once or twice violently to the ground. The prisoner Smith still continued to urge the old man to go home with her, repeating she would give him three sovereigns and treat him well as she had been in a bad state for nine or ten months and that she was bewitched.
After the closing of the Swan the parties moved outside with the prisoner Smith standing by the side of Dummy declaring that he should go home with her.
She then tore the old man's coat and struck him several times over the arms and the shoulders with a stick and kicked him and dragged him down to a little brook near the Swan and said " you old devil you served me out, now I will serve you out". Smith then shoved him into the brook and when he was getting out the other side she went round over a little bridge and the other prisoner, Stammers, went through the brook and they pushed him back into the brook. He succeeded in getting out and went and sat down on a stone heap until the two prisoners dragged him towards the brook, one taking hold of him under the armpits and the other by the legs they threw him into the brook at a point where the brook is dammed up and was of some little depth, he remained struggling until one of the villagers called out that " If someone did not take the old man out he would die in a minute," the prisoner Stammers jumped into the water and pulled him out. He lay on the grass for some time in a very exhausted state, wet and muddy, they eventually led him home to his miserable little hut where he lay in that condition in his wet clothes all night.
The only direct evidence of the throwing into the brook by the two prisoners was that of a little girl named Eva Henrietta Garrad, who is about ten years of age and who gave her evidence in such a way as to elicit from the learned Judge the observation that she was gifted with extraordinary power of intellect and cleverness of explanation he had ever met with and that he could conceive no possible reason to doubt the truth of her story. On the morning of the 4th the old man was seen in his hut by Mr Fowke, still in his wet clothes and trembling violently. He was also a good deal bruised and screamed from pain when his clothes were taken off him. He was then under the direction of the surgeon and taken to the Union House at Halstead and placed under the care of Mr Sinclair the house surgeon where he remained until his death on the 4th of September last. The post mortem examination showed that the lungs and the kidneys were much disorganised, the pericardium adhering to the heart and a suffusion of the lymph on the membrane of the brain indicating recent inflammatory action and the witness gave as his opinion that he died from disease of kidneys produced by immersion in water and sleeping in wet clothes and in this opinion the witness was coroberated by another medical man who attended the post mortem.
For the defence it was contended that the evidence of the little girl could not be relied on and without it there was no evidence that either of the two prisoners threw the old man into the water and secondly there was not sufficient evidence that the death resulted from the immersion and that it might have resulted from some other injury the old man might have received by the falls the old man might have had in the tap room of the Swan public house.
The learned Judge then summed up the case with great care and the Jury immediately found the prisoners guilty and they were sentenced to six months hard labour, the learned Judge said that he took in to consideration the mental condition of the female prisoner and the fact that when Stammers found that there was a danger he took the poor old man out of the water. The case lasted five hours.

March 15th 1864

George Bullock from Cavendish was charged with breaking a fence belonging to the Blacklands Estate. John Cockerton said I am employed by Mr Garrett and I went to " Kemsey's Wood" to do up a fence with two hurdles when defendant came along and trod them down saying he had orders from his employer Mr Norton as he had an old barn which they reached by the path and had went that way for twenty years. Dismissed.

April 12th 1864

James Mitchell of Melford was summoned by his employer Mr F.Branwhite for absenting himself from work as horsekeeper for one day on the 4th. Defendant acknowledged the charge. 7 days hard labour.

May 1st 1864

Walter Alliston aged 14 of Glemsford summoned for stealing a piece of wood woth 9d from Mr Benjamin Deaves a farmer of Hunts Hill, Glemsford. William Clarry said I work for Mr Deaves and met defendant with a piece of wood, I said I know where you got that from and defendant said dont say anything about it and i will take it back, I told my master, the boy asked my master to look over it, he would not. 7 days and a whipping.

May 31st 1864

The bells of Walter Belchamp rang a merry peal at intervals during the day on the 23rd to welcome the Rev J.St.Clare Raymond on his return to his ancestral home at Belchamp Hall in which exetensive repairs have been done and improvements since the death of the late squire.

May 31st 1864

Isaac Ransom late of the Plough Inn in Stour Street, Sudbury was charged with harbouring certain persons of notoriously bad character in his house. P.C.Scott and P.C.Humphrey said they went to the defendant's house and in the tap room there were 30-40 people, men women and boys, singing, shouting, clapping and hurrahing. On the table stood a pail of beer from which they were drinking, among them were old and young Bantock and a girl Bantock who were bad characters.
Defendant told the police that the incoming landlord named Viall was giving the people a treat. Case dimissed.

June 7th 1864

Jeremiah Newman a labourer of Cavendish was charged with assaulting his employer, Mr Pratt Vial. Mr Vial said I went to my field in the evening where two men had been working sowing artificial manure for turnips, the manure was sown too thickly in some places and naked in others, there was enough for seven acres only four was sown. Next morning I went to defendant when he was working and said put that cob down for I have discharged you, he got hold of my collar and put his fist in my face. Fined 11s and 5s 6d costs.

June 22nd 1864

William Reeve of Cavendish was charged by his employer Mr Pratt Vial, with wilful damage. Mr Vial said four men were engaged in hoeing mangels, in the evening I went into the field and found 160 plants cut up, next morning I asked the men who did it, they said it was Reeve, Henry Angle, farm bailiff, corroborated. Adjourned.

August 9th 1864

The Sudbury-Melford railway line is making slow progress, the only place where progress is visible is the embankment between Ballingdon and Brundon and the brick piers which the bridge will be formed over the street at Ballingdon. A difficult part is to be performed, this is to excavate and brick seven piers at the proposed bridge over the river between Friars meadow and Ballingdon street, the obstacles are far greater than the Friars meadow bridge where the footings go down 30 feet, one of the piers is to be built in the middle of the river, excavations are very slow owing to the decayed peat and quick sand.

August 20th 1864

Sale of Live and Dead Stock at Middleton Hall by the directions of the exors of the late Samuel Vial. 21 cart horses-4 cart colts-1 hackney mare 5 years old-well known herd of 16 choice valuable Suffolk milch cows-200 half bred lambs-30 fat hogs-40 shoats.

August 20th 1864

At Stanstead White Hart Inn on the 23rd of September, the valuable mill premises-private residence-business premises. Situated near the village of Stanstead.

September 20th 1864

On Sunday afternoon last a woman named Harriet Turp the wife of a labourer of Pentlow was drowned. She was walking with her neice and another woman named Suttle along the new line of the railway which is in ths course of construction between Melford and Clare. On arriving at the new cut made to receive the river on the land of Mr Byford the deceased crossed the plank placed across the channel which was for the use of workmen employed in building the railway, the others refused to follow, when she returned she fell from the plank which was only 14" wide and the cut being 30 to 40ft wide and the water 6ft deep, she was drowned. Her companions ran 3/4 of a mile before they could find anyone to help, two men recovered the body. Accidental drowning.

September 27th 1864

Thomas Brown, Daniel Suttle and Joseph Woolard, labourers of Glemsford were summoned by Thomas Ballard a gamekeeper for Maj Hinchcliffe of Pentloe Hall for tresspassing on land at Cavendish in search of game. Fined 20s and 9s 6d costs.

October 25th 1864

At a meeting of Sudbury Town Council, Mr Garnham said an offer had been accepted by Mr Green of the Horn Inn for a cottage abutting the Horn Inn which if pulled down would give a right of way from North street to Back Lane opposite one of the new roads now being on Woodhall Farm.

November 15th 1864

Ther was an inquest at the Bull Inn, Cavendish, on the body of William Simmons an excise officer stationed at Cavendish. Ellen Simmons said her husband had recently taken up drinking and was in arrears with his accounts. He was found with gun shot wounds, he was to meet his Superintendent of excise this week. Open Verdict.

November 29th 1864

Lord and Lady Paget have been entertaining a select circle of friends at Melford Hall. On Wednesday, his Lordship accompanied by Lord Claredon Paget, Mr Hammond who is British Consul at Cherbourg, Captain Bence and Mr N.Barnadiston, they shot through the preserves and bagged 1549 head of game.

December 6th 1864

James Wright and Ezra Spark of Shimpling were summoned by James Whymark the underkeeper from Chadacre who said I was watching a snare with a hare in it when I saw two men arrive, although it was foggy, I think I saw Spark bend down and take the hare out of the snare. Dismissed.

December 27th 1864

The butchers of Melford exhibited their usual supply of good meat this Christmas. At the shop of Mr Seagers were four fine beasts which he purchased at Bury Christmas sale, one grazed by Mr Nunn of Eldo house weighed 114 stone, there were several fine sheep from Mr Mills of Rodbridge farm. Mr Allen also exhibited some fine sheep and 100 turkeys and a large quantity of geese. Upwards of 70 geese were distributed among members of the goose clubs held at the Lion and Hare Inns.