The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1860 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive

The news in Britain in 1860

January 3rd 1860

A shocking accident happened to a 9 year old boy named John Joslyn who is the son of a chimney sweep and in the employ of Mr Richold at the cocoa nut fibre factory at Melford. It appears the boy went to one of crushing machines which was in motion and caught his arm in it. All that medical skill could do was done to relieve the suffer but to no avail as he sank under in a few hours. No blame could be attached to anyone.

January 10th 1860

John Woolard and Thomas Prentice of Cavendish were charged with furious driving. They were summoned by Supt. Death who said he saw defendants driving furiously near Cavendish Hall and were abreast of each other as though racing, Prentice was driving his own horse and cart, Woolard was driving two horses and a van the property of his master Mr William Byford of Cavendish, the horses had no reins on them.
Woolard fined 10s 6d and with 4s 6d costs and Prentice 6s 6d with 4s 6d costs.

January 17th 1860

Michael Collis was charged with disturbing the congregation at Bildeston, defendant said he was drunk. The prosecution decided not to offer evidence, Mr Orris said defendant was perfectly drunk and went into the Chapel and made great disturbance. The chairman said he had been kindly treated and could have been fined 40L and that everyone had a right to worship as they pleased.
Discharged.

January 17th 1860

Henry Newman, maltster of Edwardstone, was charged with stealing 3 pints of malting barley from his master at Edwardstone. P.c. Skippen said he saw defendant leave the malting when he induced him to stop and he took from his pockets 3 pints of barley.
3 months hard labour.

January 24th 1860

The deposit of 8 per cent upon estimated capital of Sudbury to Clare railway line has been made and no opposition was offered on standing orders, a great many shares have been taken up and there is no doubt the project will be carried out.

January 24th 1860

John Suttle and Arthur Clarke of Glemsford were charged with trespassing on land belonging to William Byford of Glemsford who said he was walking in one of his fields called Woodfield when he saw two men walking, one had a gun, he ran onto the other side of the hedge towards the men, they said to him "it's you is it", he said you have no business here, they had mistaken him for another person. 1 with 6s 3d costs each.

January 31st 1860

There was a fatal accident to a man named Jolly aged 47 in the employ of Mr George Rollinson of Rede. The inquest was held at Whepstead White Horse Inn.
George Arnold in the employ of Mr John Cooke of the steam mills at Bury, said he had been to Hartest and was coming down the hill from Whepstead towards the wash at the bottom when he saw deceased with a tumbrel load of stones with three horses coming down Harram Hill, deceased was hanging on the shafts trying to stop it but with the weight it kept gathering on them, deceased fell down and the horses kept running through the water and about 40 yards up the other hill. Witness said he caught the horses and tied them up and got deceased into his cart to take to Whepstead White Horse when he died. Enquiries were made at public houses on the road and there was no evidence of having drink of any kind. Accidental.

February 7th 1860

William Alexander a mail cart driver from Colchester was charged for being drunk while driving from Clare to Cavendish.
Defendant said he partook of some ale with a friend. Defendant was driving when he left Clare and at Cavendish he upset his cart and broke it, another cart was lent him but he had not gone far when had another upset. When he arrived at Melford the cart was driven by someone else.
Fined 20L and costs of 1L 15s.

February 7th 1860

Charlotte Maxim of Cavendish was charged with stealing a pair of India rubber galoshes valued at 2s from Sophia Hammond of Cavendish. Sarah Hammond said,
"I live as a servant at Mr Pratt Vial's at Colts Hall, Cavendish, I lost a pair of galoshes, the prisoner was working there at the time". James Brown aged 16 said
" I was working for Mr Vial, Sophia would lend me the galoshes sometimes and these are the ones produced".
Mrs Viall said prisoner was helping at Christmas time for a week; she took Sophia to the prisoner's house in Cavendish where she produced them and admitted taking them.
Admitted on bail until the next Sessions.

February 14th 1860

There was a fatal accident at Cockfield Mill to Thomas Bier who was killed by the falling down of the mill. The dangerous state of the mill had been noticed for sometime past, he leaves a widow and 6 children. The inquest was held at the King's Head, Cockfield on Thomas Bier aged 39 years who occupied the old post mill situated on the a little eminence leading from Bury to Lavenham.
Accidental.

February 14th 1860

Letters to the Editor

I think it might be of some interest to your readers that on Saturday the 18th inst, I shot at Livermere a fine specimen of White Tailed Eagle or Sea Eagle, the bird was in poor condition although it weighed 10 lbs and measured 7ft 1in from wing tip to wing tip, it had been observed taking fish from the water.

R.D.Gough.

March 6th 1850

A fund for the family of Jacob Bier, miller of Cockfield has been set up and subscriptions will be received by Messrs Oakes, bankers of Bury.

March 6th 1860

A fatal accident occurred to a bargeman named Martin, employed by Messrs Hibble and Co. of Sudbury, was guiding a large barge under Lodge Bridge when it struck one of the piles of the bridge and jarred it so much that steersman Martin was thrown off and sucked under the barge, it was more than an hour before his body was recovered.

March ? 1860

The annual nuisance occurred at Sudbury on Monday and Tuesday when the greater part of the hill was blocked with stalls and shew carts with bawling men and squeaking women, while the ears of the numerous nearby residents were dinned with unmelodious sounds. For the morals of the young these fairs ought to be stopped and abolished.

March 13th 1860

On the 6th the new Baptist Chapel at Clare was opened at Clare when three sermons were preached by the Rev Collins of Grundisburgh, a dinner was provided at the Priory where a 100 people sat down and in the afternoon 300 sat down in the corn exchange. The Chapel will seat 400, the cost was 870L, 600L has been raised and the further 200L has been lent free of interest. It was designed and built by Mr Last of this town.

 

March 13th 1860

Inquest at Chilton Sudbury on Abraham Martin aged 45 years, William Martin said the previous morning he was with his father in a barge of Mrs Allen's on the ditch side of the river, deceased was trying to keep it off the bridge but a good deal of wind caused it to swing and knock against post which jerked him overboard, they could not help quickly enough as the water was running very strong, it was more than an hour before the body was recovered.
Accidental.

March 6th 1860

Minerva Grice aged 13 was charged with stealing a cake from the shop of Joseph Atkins of Melford on Saturday the 25th inst, the poor girl appeared to felt her position acutely and acknowledged her guilt. The Bench as a warning to her and others sent her to gaol for 14 days.

March 6th 1860

About 6-30 on Sunday morning a man named Simpson was walking on Low Road at Hitcham when he saw a hat on the road and 30 yards further on he saw a body lying on the brow of a ditch, quite dead, it proved to be R. Luckey, the elder son of Mr R.Luckey of Hitcham, recently deceased.
It appears deceased was drinking in Hitcham White Horse nearly all Saturday and left about 11-40 on the night, he had nearly arrived at his lodgings at Mr Green's farm. Deceased who was respectfully connected, led a irregular life and it is feared he fell victim to his dissipated habits.

March 13th 1860

Deaths----On January 2nd at Hobart Town, Van Diemens Land, from injuries caused by the explosion of a rocket during practice, aged 18 years, George Hamilton Borton R.N. of Her Majesty's ship Pelorus, he is the fourth son of the Rev Borton, rector of Hartest, Sudbury.

March 13th 1860

Charlotte Maxim was acquitted on the charge of stealing galoshes at Cavendish.

Marech 13th 1860

Joshua Hemstead, ostler of Melford, aged 16 years, who was charged with rape at Melford, was found guilty and sentenced to 9 months in prison.

March 27th 1860

Joshua Hemstead of Melford was found guilty of attempted rape at Bridge Street, Melford. 9 months hard labour.

 

April 3rd 1860

For sale by auction at the auction mart at Bury on April 11th, 4 superb working Devon oxen, 5 years old, first rate workers and direct from hard work.

April 3rd 1860

Married at Spitalfields, London---Mr J.F.Orbell of Goldingham Hall, Bulmer, Essex, to Marianne Lucy the eldest daughter of Mr J.Catt of Manor House Witnesham.

April 2nd 1860

Died on the 2nd inst at Bulmer, Essex, with humble submission to Divine Will, John, oldest son of Charles Adams, late of Borley.

April 17th 1860

Frederick Angel and Alfred Brabrook, labourers of Cavendish, were summoned by their employer, Mr Pratt Vial, of Cavendish for drunkenness.
Mr Viall said that about 7 in the morning he sent them to Sudbury with two tumbrels and two horses each, they returned at 4-30 in the afternoon, about 6 he heard a noise in the stable, he went in and saw Angel beating a horse with a whip, he asked him what he was doing and he said they had got at the corn hutch, defendant was drunk, Brabrook not so drunk, Mr Viall called one of his men who stated defendant was not so drunk but a bit worse for what they had.
Angel 5s with 8s 6d costs,
Brabrook withdrawn.
Frederick Angel was further charged with unlawfully riding in a tumbrel with three horses without reins at Pentlow. 2s 6d with 2s 6d costs.

April 24th 1860

Married on the 30th of January at Prahran, Australia, James Hassel, widower, late of Ballingdon, Essex, to Louisa Woods, widow of Prahran

May 1st 1860

Last Friday, in the noble old church in the ancient village of Long Melford in company of 900 gentry and poorer inhabitants of the district, we listened to an appeal from the minister of religion for aid to erect a beautiful and capacious school for the children of the poor of Melford. We trust that the school which is to be finished in October will prove beneficial to the village of Melford

March 8th 1860

Sudbury-Clare Railway Line. The bill was brought before a committee, a petition against it by the Rev Jenner and Mr John Barker, the former being a tenant for life of Clare Hill Farm and the latter a reversioner. Mr Burke, instructed by Messrs Crowder and Maynard Co., appeared for the promoters, several witnesses attended to support the line but no-one appeared for the petitioners. It is regretted they did not give notice of their intention to withdraw their opposition, as it would have saved a lot of money.
The line would accommodate a large agricultural district, there are no less than 12 water mills and steam mills and several large factories between Sudbury and Clare.

March 8th 1860

Died on the 1st inst in London, John Hale youngest of the late John Hale of Brook Hall, Essex.

March 15th 1860

Sarah Moss, widow of Melford, was charged with stealing 50 lbs of sprouts valued at 3s, the property of Gainsborough Dupont. Stephen Scott, farm bailiff to Mr Dupont, said, I went to a field in Melford called "the Queach" and saw the prisoner coming with sprouts under her arm. 1s with 7s 6d costs.

March 22nd 1860

Funeral at Stanstead, Suffolk, of Daniel Alston of Stanstead Hall, it was well attended by a large circle of friends and gentlemen. As the oldest tenant of the Kentwell Hall estate he acquired the regard and esteem of his former landlords, the late Hart Logan and the present owner Capt Starkie Bence at whose requirement the coffin was made from some of the finest timber grown on the estate. He attained the ripe old age of 73 years.

March 22nd 1860

Died at Cavendish Rectory-The Rev Thomas Castley at the age of 95 years, his father lived till near 100 years.

March 22nd 1860

Post Corn Windmill, known as Armsey or Bulmer Mill for sale.

April 24th 1860

There was an inquest at Groton Fox Inn om the body of Sarah Rice aged 5 months the child of John and Harriet Rice. Mr T.G.Gurdon, surgeon said the child had a little cough for a day or two and on Tuesday it could not get its breath and died. Natural death.

April 24th 1860

There was an inquest at the George Hotel, Cavendish, on the Celia Turp, aged three years, the daughter of a widow of this parish.
It appears that on Monday morning the child drank some hot water from the kettle on the hob while its mother was getting the dinner for her other children. Mrs Turp took it to an neighbour, Mrs Battram, having heard it was good to have a child which had been scalded or burnt, blessed. The wise woman accordingly blessed it by wiping her finger round its mouth three times but it did not change anything and the poor child died the next evening. Mr Waring, surgeon, said the child's throat was so blistered and swollen it could not swallow. Died from drinking hot water out of a kettle.

April 24th 1860

A fire broke out on a offhand farm at Stoke by Clare called Cains Hill and occupied by Mr F.Payne and owned by Mr Elwes. The house and buildings with some corn and implements were destroyed. It is supposed that a spark from a steam engine working nearby occassioned the fire.

May 8th 1860

At Bury Corn Market, per quarter. Wheat-49s. Barley-33s 1 d. Oats-21s 8 d. Beans-42s. Fat cattle-7s 6d to 8s per stone. Hoggets- 50s to 53s each. Ewes with lambs- 35s to 60 per couple. Fat hogs-dear.

May 15th 1860

At a meeting of Sudbury Town Coucil it was decided that on Tuesday next a general perambulation of the town's external boundaries should be carried out properly. The following were admitted as freemen - Thomas Green, malster of North Street, Thomas Sillitoe, plumber and glazier of Back Lane. William Must a weaver of Wigan End. Charles Joslin a weaver of Garden Row.

May 29th 1860

Nathan Nunn of Hargrave, aged 15 years was charged with stealing two duck eggs valued at 1d from Mr John Murton of Somerton. The boy was working with a thatcher on the prosecutors premises and seeing a ducks nest in the hedge took two eggs from it.
The prosecutor said he did not wish to press the charge but he thought it would teach the boy a lesson and to others. The bench ordered the constable to whip the boy as a caution.

June 5th 1860

On Wednesday evening Mrs Jarman from Glemsford went to the wood hovel attached to her house, as she opened the door she something bright on the floor, she called her neighbour to come and have a look and there lay the countenance of a friend, bright gold guineas protruding from a rotten piece of paper. It appears that as she opened the door the treasure dropped from the under the thatch, they are equal to 8 guineas, 6 and 4 halves and bearing the spade of George 111. Nine pounds have been offered for the treasure.
The old thatch has had some rummaging and Mrs Jarman has been dubbed a lucky woman.

June 5th 1860

The curious effect of the recent gales can be seen at the north entrance of Chadacre Hall. The aerial fluid seems akin to water in that it gathers in force in the valley and this richly wooded gorge, a plantation seen from the road the trees lie strawed about, just as when one cutteth and heweth wood upon the earth. This is on the south side, on the north side is an opening in the trees as if shot had gone in and directed to clear a passage in that direction. The firs are blown or broken off and every locality has its details of losses by this mighty invisible power.

June 26th 1860

John Argent and Arthur Collard, labourers of Cavendish, were summoned for trespassing in pursuit of game at Cavendish on land belonging to Mr J.S.Garrett. Gamekeeper Cockerton said he was watching a snare in Kimsley Wood and saw Argent take up the snare and put it in his pocket.
Defendants said they went through the wood on the way to work for the nearest as the path was in common usage till Mr Garrett bought the property.
Discharged with a caution.

July 3rd 1860

One evening last week, a boy in the employ of Richard Rolfe of Cheveley, was crossing the yard in which there was a horse and mare feeding from a crib, when the horse, a rather furious one, ran at him and commenced mangling him, the lad called out and the mare immediately ran at the horse with open mouth and seized him by the shoulder causing the horse to let go, the boy escaped with painful wounds.

July 31st 1860

For sale by auction at the Half Moon, Clare,---At Belchamp St Pauls-Lot 1, situated near Cold Fair Green, a messuage with barn-stable and other buildings, 51 acres, in occupation of Messrs Chaplin-Eagle-Chickall-Ray. Lot 2 -Saville field, 7 acres, abutting the road to Ovington-Lot 3-Pochey Hall, in the tenure of Mr Chickall-Lot 4, 5 acres called Eggland.

August 7th 1860

Maria Howe of Lavenham was summoned by police Sergeant Hoggar for assaulting him. Defendant said at about 11 at night I was told by a woman that my husband was talking to another woman in the street, I saw complainant and thought it was my husband, I ran up to him and slapped his face, I am very sorry but I was excited at the time.
Fined 1s with 6s 6d costs.

August 28th 1860

Married in London-Thomas Willesmere of Korcroit Grange, Williams Town, Australia to Marrianne Maria, eldest daughter of Thomas Worman of Belchamp Walter in Essex.

September 4th 1860

We regret to state reports of the increase in the unfavourableness in the neighbourhood of the potato crop. On the lots of the freehold land at Risbygate, Bury, are almost an entire failure throughout, the south and midland counties report the same although in Ireland and Scotland they prove above.

September 4th 1860

On Tuesday at about 1 o' clock, two labourers named Joseph Goold and James Bird in the employ of Mr Chenery of Thorpe Morieux in Suffolk went to the Bull Inn while hindered from harvesting by rain, after drinking a quart of mild beer they called for two quarts of strong beer, between 7 and 8 they were joined by another two men named Sewell and Pryke and three pints of middle brew were drunk
At 9 o' clock Goold was so incapable he fell down in the kitchen and they carried him to the stable and laid him down in the straw, his neck cloth and collar were loosened, about an hour later the landlord went to bed leaving him snoring, thinking he would get up and go home, on going to the stable at between 5-6 in the morning he found Goold dead and stiff. Mr Growse, surgeon, said his mouth and throat were full of vomit and that he died through suffocation, there were small marks on his skin caused by him falling over, Pryke had also struck him several times in fun but not savagely.
Died through suffocation. A similar case is reported from Peterborough last week, an Irish harvestman went to sleep in a stable, two of his countrymen left him there, when in the morning he was found dead, the surgeon said he suffocated.

September 4th 1860

A religious service was held by the body of Friends on Sunday evening in a barn belonging to Mr Ruffel near Melford turnpike gate, it was attended by a large congregation.

September 4th 1860

Charles Savage, a farmer of Hundon was charged with stealing a sovereign from Spencer Ruse, a miller of the parish. The parties were at the Lion in Hundon and Ruse himself admitted being in drink, he took out his money amounting to 5 10s in gold and some silver and laid it on the table, a half sovereign was dropped on the floor and a candle was taken from the table to look for it and the prisoner on the evidence of William Clarke, a dealer, put his hand in the money. The magistrates dismissed the case and cautioned the prisoner to be more careful in future.

September 4th 1860

A gentleman of Suffolk was travelling in Wisconsin, the state of which Chicago is the shipping port. He writes to a friend that on the morning he had travelled a distance of 18 miles through a unbroken field of wheat, he was accompanied by a friend to the only hill in the neighbourhood from which the eye ranged across a vast plain, the whole of which was covered with wheat, the countryman asked him to count the reaping machines and he counted 97.

September 4th 1860

At Woolpit fair on Monday there was a large show of horses and ponies but trade was dull except for Irish ponies which were in great demand.

September 4th 1860

Last week a valuable horse belonging to Mr S. Pearson of Clare was feeding on Old Barley meadow, (perhaps should read Old Bailey) when it got it's feet firmly fixed in a drain, it was found in a state of exhaustion and died before it could be drawn out by pulleys.

September 18th 1860

There was an inquest at Lavenham Cock Inn on John Wilding a labourer of Lavenham, aged 76 years. He was last seen on Wednesday morning and had not been seen for several days, his neighbour looked for him and found him dead in the privy. Deceased had nearly 100L in the savings bank.
Natural causes.

September 25th 1860

Married on Monday 25th of July at Castlemaine, Australia, J. Acquetill, draper of Campbell's Creek, previously of Seven Oaks, Kent, to Mary Hannah, eldest daughter of Mr T. Pattle of Bury.

September 25th 1860

On Saturday last the post windmill situated a short distance from Bildeston and belonging to Mr King was destroyed by fire, it was 60 years to the day when it was first used on which occasion Bildeston celebrated the event by the ringing of a peal of hand bells in the mill.

September 25th 1860

For sale -Live and dead stock at Cardinals Farm, Foxearth and of Lyston Hall Farm, near Sudbury. J Carter and Jones are favoured with instructions from the executors of the late Mr T.S. Ewer to sell by auction on the premises at 12 o' clock, the live and dead stock.-10 horses-10 promising 2-3 year old colts and fillies-6 foals-20 Shorthorn heifers-10 Suffolk cows-quantity of swine-assortment of farm implements-pony chaise-harness-gig by Deeks and Hayward of Clare-dog cart by Hunneybun.

October 2nd 1860

On Tuesday last the foundation stone for the new tower was laid at Glemsford in the presence of a large body of Clergy and Gentlemen of the neighbourhood.

October 2nd 1860

For sale at Wait's Farm, Belchamp Walter, Essex , Blunden and Squire will sell by auction on the premises on October 10th by direction of William Wright who has let the estate, the live and dead stock. 6 horses-2 promising 3 years old colts by Mr Badham's horse- chestnut colt- 6 Welsh heifers in calf-35 ewes-113 half bred lambs-24 shoats-impalements-horse powered chaff cutter-3 hp steam chaff engine. The above are suited to cultivations of 200 cars.

October 2nd 1860

On Tuesday last the foundation stone was laid for the new tower at Glemsford church, it was laid in the presence of a large number of clergy and gentry. There was a collection after the sermon which amounted to 45L 14s making with some previous subscriptions amounts to 345L. The contrast for the tower is 700L. The builder is Mr Fordham of Melford and Mr Johnson of Bury is the architect.

October 9th 1860

On May 26th-Accidentally drowned while crossing a flooded river in the province of Otago, New Zealand, George Calvert the second son of the Rev Blathawayt of Leiston in Suffolk.

October 9th 1860

The surveyor has commenced " staking out" the new railway line to be built between Sudbury and Clare on Saturday last and there is every reason to believe that the line to Clare will be completed before this time twelvemonth. The line will run from near Cady's lane across Mr Stedman and Mr King's field, by the gasworks over Mrs Baker's meadow to the river, crossing of which will at the back of Mr Sparrow's house across the Prospect over the Marsh and by there to Borley.

 

October 9th 1860

To be sold at the Auction Mart on Tuesday---Brettenham Park Estate is offered for sale comprising a noble mansion-part of the village of Brettenham with Risings and Wetherden Hall and 11 fertile farms, the whole occupying 1740 acres. It was knocked down exclusive of timber at 64.000.

October 9th 1860

John Wallage of Denston in Suffolk was charged with violating his own daughter, Betsy Wallage aged 17 years. Mary Wallage, wife, gave evidence, the crime was committed in a daring manner in spite of remonstrations from both.

October 16th 1860

The wretch who is charged with the horrible crime (we could almost say it is unhappily no longer capital) a case of greater depravity has never come before our criminal tribunals.

October 16th 1860

Foxearth annual harvest home was held last Tuesday and was attended by a large number of labourers of the parish and the friends and gentry of the district. In the morning there was the show of cottagers vegetables in the schoolroom and at 1-30 a procession of children and the clergy with the choir, preceded by Sudbury Volunteer band, paraded through the village to the church where the evening service was intoned by the Curate with chanting and an anthem, the harvest hymn and the old 100th Psalm was sung, the sermon was preached by the Rev Borton of Wickham St Pauls.
Dinner was served in a large tent on the Rectory lawn and was partaken by nearly 500 persons, 400 lbs of meat alone was cooked in addition to plum pudding and pies.
The Rector and his visitors occupied one table and the labourers the other, there was dancing on the lawn and the popular sport of Aunt Sally followed by dancing in the schoolroom in which the visitors freely mixed with the cottagers until 11 when supper was provided.
The exertions of the Rev Foster and his lady and the Rev Irvine, Curate, for the comfort of all was unceasing, the arrangements made were on a liberal scale.

October 16th 1860

Jane Curtis was summoned by Ann Potter for assaulting her at Acton on the 6th. The dispute arose between the parties about some money complainant had lost from her basket while spending largess.
By the wish of the bench the parties settled out of court.

October 16th 1860

Highly valuable estate at Acton to be sold. Messrs Blunden and Squire will sell at the Crown Inn, the well accustomed Acton Crown Inn of modern red brick erection and sash front. Comprising entrance, large club room, bar parlour, kitchen, tap room, 8 bedrooms, brewhouse, extensive cellarage, chaise house, stables and ten pin shed, malting and coomb steep, large malting and barley chambers, farmyard and buildings, barn, horse and cow sheds and piggeries. 10 acres of luxuriant arable land, small orchard. The above property is beside the road and an enterprising man will find it highly lucrative as there are no beer shops are in the neighbourhood.

October 23rd 1860

The opening of the National School at Melford takes place on October the 30th.

October 23rd 1860

On Saturday last there was a large assemblage at Twinstead to see the opening of the new church of St John Evangelist by the bishop of Rochester. The rector the Rev H. O. Shortland with the parishioners and others have spent a large amount of money in removing the old church and erecting a handsome new church. We are unable to give account of the offertory and other particulars for our representative applied to the family at the rectory for information and although we have walked five miles on a very dirty road and waited a long time, not the least attention was was shown.

October 23rd 1860

The village of Long Melford was the scene of rejoicing on the occasion of the opening of the National School, having been only 4 months erecting it. The school which is of the Elizabethan style greatly enhances the beauty of Melford Green.

October 30th 1860

Robert Bruce of Lawshall was summoned by Mrs Elizabeth Field, landlady of the Harrow Inn for assaulting her, defendant admitted the charge, complainant said he brought to her house an empty beer bottle and demanded a drink for doing so, she gave him a glass of drink and he wanted more, she refused and he shook his fist in her face using abusive language. The Bench said that the young men of that parish seemed bent on such misconduct but they were determined to stop it and would inflict a fine of 1 on him and 6s 6d costs.

October 30th 1860

Jeremiah Norman a labourer of Cavendish for being drunk and disorderly at Cavendish was fined 15s. The bench said that the police now had a constable in the village and they were determined to support him. Isaac Wordley of Glemsford was sent to prison for 7 days at the same court for being drunk and riotous at Cavendish. The bench said it was the custom of the young men of Glemsford to go to the parish of Cavendish and misbehave themselves in a disorderly manner.

October 30th 1860

The 13th anniversary of the Sudbury Agricultural Society took place on the Chilton Hall Estate. There were 34 ploughs, champion was N.Gardener 2-J.Wright 1 10s-William Mingay 1.

November 20th 1860

The Colne Valley and Halstead Railway propose to carry on an extension of it's line from Clare and Haverhill through the northern part of Essex to Cambridge where it would join the proposed Bedford- Cambridge line.

November 20th 1860

Armsey Mill and Mill house to be sold.

November 20th 1860

On Saturday evening an accident happened to Tobias Wicker a fishmonger from Halstead on his returning to Halstead from Sudbury where he had been doing business. He left his pony and cart in the care of a boy but when he returned he could not find them, deceased decided to walk to home and never reached it as he was found dead in a ditch on Sunday afternoon two miles from Halstead.

December 4th 1860

On Friday, two Irish dealers named John Caffray and Andy Holmes were charged with being drunk and disorderly at Bury. On Thursday the defendants were at Mr Madders beerhouse and began to be disorderly, Mr Madder tried to turn them out when Holmes drew a knife and threatened to use it, the police were sent for and the defendants taken into custody, on searching them at the police station they found Holmes had 90 on him and Caffray has 40. Discharged with the payment of expenses.

December 4th 1860

Breach of Promise Case was held in the Secondaries' Court at Chelmsford in Essex. On Wednesday a writ of inquiry was held to assess damages in an action for breach of promise of marriage recently brought against the Rev Philip Brett, M.A. rector of Mount Bures in Essex by a young lady named Cookshott now filling a situation as governess in Manchester, the defendant having suffered judgement by default, the damages were laid at 5000, but to the great disappointment of persons assembled to hear the case a verdict of 1200 was agreed to.

December 11th 1860

Married at Harbledown near Canterbury-The Rev Robert Godolphin Peter, rector of Cavendish, Suffolk, late fellow and tutor of Jesus College, Cambridge to Catharine Stewart, daughter of the Rev Lyall, rector of Harbeldown.

December 11th 1860

At Sudbury Town Council Meeting, the Mayor, Mr S. Higgs stated that the Wood Hall shackage question was settled, he had written to Messrs Gepp and Vely, solicitors for the owners saying he had no objections to the withdrawal of the requisition on the understanding that the valuation of the agreement was not disturbed, the solicitors replied that they were ready to adhere to the valuation and the Corporation should have Fulling Pit meadow and the whole of North Meadow and a 1000 in money, the withdrawal of acceptance and second requisition including the whole of North Meadow was the best mode, this was accordingly done by the Council.

December 11th 1860

Sudbury Market. Not so large attendance today, what wheat was at hand was of poor order so little business was done, the barley trade was also not so good. Talavera wheat to 60s- white wheat to 60s-red wheat to 50s- rivets to 40s-grinding barley to 32s malting to 42s.

December 25th  1860

Martha Wells from Cavendish was charged with stealing 24 turnips valued at 6d from a clamp the property of Mr J. S. Garrett, the case was proved by John Cockerton the gamekeeper. 14 days prison.