The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1859 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive


The news in Britain in 1859 Bury and Norwich Post 1859

January 4th 1859

Died---Mr Rumball of Lower Yeldham, formerly of Clare. The poor always found him a kind and thoughtful friend and his last act was ministering to their social enjoyment at Christmas.

January 4th 1859

Inquest at Honington Fox Inn on William Cutting.
William Balaam, shoemaker, said deceased was aged 75 years and he saw him yesterday at 6 -7 in the evening in Mr Norton's beerhouse. ' He was sound asleep when I went in and recovering from being a bit freshy, he gave me a squid of tobacco to see him safe home but on going outside said he would not trouble me on going home with him, he would have to pass a ditch near Mr Wainwright's premises.'
 John Brunning said
'I went for Mr Waiwright at past 9, I found deceased dead in a drain near my master's premises, he lay along the bottom on his stomach with the water just covering up to his ears.'
Accidental Death.

January 11th 1859

On Friday, William Clark of Belchamp St Pauls, Essex was charged with fraudulently attempting to enlist in the West Suffolk Militia being at the time a Private in the Essex Rifles. Fined 16s in default 7 days hard labour.

January 11th 1859

Frederick Boreham and James Good of Glemsford were charged with shooting a partridge on the land of Mr E. Hale at Cavendish. Alfred Makin proved seeing Boreham fire the gun but could not swear Good was the man with him. Good discharged and Boreham fined 11s 6d with 6s 6d expenses.

January 11th 1859

Frederick Boreham and James Good of Glemsford were charged at Melford Petty Sessions with shooting partridges on land belonging to Mr E.Hale at Cavendish. Alfred Makin proved he saw Boreham fire a gun at partridges. Good discharged and Boreham fined 11s 6d with 5s 6d costs.



January 18th 1859

On Tuesday afternoon, a respectable dressed woman called at Sudbury Police station and asked to see the Superintendent, Mrs Sach said her husband was out but the woman gave her a parcel, she suspected something was wrong and on his return her husband opened it and found it contained the body of a fine healthy female child.
The Supt. immediately went in search of the woman whom he found near Mr Harding the chemist's shop where it turned out she was living in service, she gave her name as Elizabeth Tyler of Milden and made a voluntary statement, which said
"I live as a servant at Mr Harding's, I went to bed at 11 on Wednesday night, I woke several times, at about 6 in the morning I delivered myself of a female child which had died.
I got up about 7 and did a normal day's work and on Thursday, Miss Ellen Harding called me and said after what she saw in my room she was obliged to tell Mama, I was then called into my master's bedroom where I saw Mr Harding, he said 'Cook, you have have had a misfortune and there is no use denying it'."

The following day the inquest court was crowded as reports had caused considerable excitement in the town. Mr Mason, surgeon, said he cannot say if the child was born alive or not. The jury said there was not enough evidence but the magistrates would have to deal with the case of concealment of birth. On Thursday the Mayor and Mr Sykes inquired into the case of concealment.
Dismissed and she was ordered to be sent home in a cab.

January 18th 1859

Harriet Bridge was charged with stealing 1s and a bank token from Mr Glasscock at Hawkedon. John Adams, shopkeeper of Hawkedon, said the prisoner's daughter produced the token and wanted two sixpences for it, he refused it as it was defaced and the girl took it home, about half an hour after the prisoner came into the shop and he said to her in a jocular way "is that one of the pieces you had before you married", she said it was one her husband took from his master. Not guilty.

January 18th 1859

Thomas Vickers who was charged with stealing 14 chickens and 10 geese from George Cornish at Lawshall. 4 months hard labour.

January 25th 1859

Died on the 21st inst at Foxearth, Charlotte, wife of Dominic Branwhite, carpenter of Foxearth.

February 15th 1859

Inquest at Eriswell on Henry Mortlock aged 26 years in the employ of Mr John Webb, farmer, it appears that the previous day deceased was engaged with two other men named William Shinn and Henry Wiseman in raising clay from a pit on Mr Webb's farm, when doing so a large piece of earth caved in on Mortlock and Wiseman, Mortlock was killed on the spot, his head being crushed to pieces, Wiseman was much injured. Mr Webb was in the pit at the time and cautioned deceased not a minute before the accident.
Accidental.

February 15th 1859

John Candler of Clare was charged with being drunk and disorderly and assaulting p.c.Youngman at Clare, the P. C. was sent for to see the drunken man in the street and found him in the Half Moon Inn, the landlady asked him to turn him out, Candler threw himself on the floor and kicked violently on the way to the police station.
 5s or two months.
Joseph Seeley, ratcatcher, of Hundon and John Ince of Clare were charged with drunkedness on the same day at Clare and were committed to the next Sessions for want of sureties.

February 15th 1859

Joseph Paske and Ewen Binks pleaded guilty to stealing a quantity of straw from an off hand farm at Kedington the property of Mr George Ambrose. 2 months hard labour each.

February 22nd 1859

A fatal accident occurred in Sudbury on Tuesday last. A man employed in building a new house at Melford road fell from the first floor through the opening left for the stairs and into the cellar.
Deceased was a plasterer an had been employed by Mr Grimwood for about four days, he had previously been on the tramp. Nobody knew his name but a pawn brokers ticket in his coat for a trowel pledged, said he was George Raiser. It appears he had four pints of beer during the day and was " freshy".
Accidental death.

February 22nd 1859

William Goult and Walter Bantock of Great Waldingfield were charged with stealing a book valued at 1s 6d. Charles Theobald a labourer said he left a book hid in a holly stub and it was missing. Goult sold it to Mrs Bowers saying he had bought from the blacksmith on the Heath. 21 days hard labour.



February 22nd 1859

The Colne Valley and Halstead railway line has been finished and handed over to the directors, the work took exactly a year, it will be open for traffic in a few weeks.

March 1st 1859

The Rev Edward Bull who for 25 years has been Rector of Pentlow parish in Essex and who has gained affection of all classes has resolved to erect memorial to his father, the Rev John Bull.
The first brick was laid last Friday, the memorial (the site of which is in an elevated position) is in the grounds of the rectory, much loved by the deceased will consist of an octagonal tower in the Tudor style in red brick with white dressings will be 16ft in diameter at the base where the walls are to be 3ft 6 inches thick and tapering to the height of 60 ft where it will be contracted to a diameter of 10 ft and rise perpendicular to 30 ft making a total of 90 ft.
It will be lighted on both sides by lancet windows and surmounted by a machicolated cornice and embattled parapet, the whole will be surmounted by a flag staff for public occasions. A spiral staircase of oak will ascend the interior to the summit from which a view of almost unequalled beauty and extent in this part of England and commanding we believe no fewer than 40 churches.
The memorial was designed by and will be executed under the direction of Mr Johnson of Bury, architect, and Mr Webb of Sudbury will be the contractor. The ceremony on Friday was performed without any show but the Rev gentleman addressed the persons present with allusions to his father's labours in the parish and his own endeavours to follow in the same steps, it is the intention the work will be finished by June next.

March 8th 1859

Inquest at Glemsford on Harry Brewster, aged 8 months, son of Thomas Brewster, a workman in the silk mill and of Barbara his wife, the child was well in the morning but in a few minutes it was dead. Mr Robert Jones, surgeon of Melford, said there was an abscess on the lungs.

March 8th 1859

The Rev O.E. Raymond M.A., formerly of Clare, has been appointed to the curacy of Bulmer, Essex.

March 8th 1859

The cuckoo has been heard at Billericay in Essex.

March 15th 1859

Died at Ovington, aged 27 years, Fanny Shepherd, wife of Samuel Death and daughter of the late Thomas Chickall.

March 15th 1859

Three little boys, John Bray, Jeramiah Garwood and Thomas Simmonds were charged with defacing statues in Barton church porch, they pleaded guilty to throwing stones at the statues. To pay 9s and expences of 2s 6d and the parents promised to have them soundly flogged.

March 22nd 1859

John Suttle and David Suttle of Glemsford were charged with trespassing on land in Cavendish belonging to Mr Norton. Walter Mills deposed said he saw defendants in Round Wood. Mr Norton said, I saw defendants in a lane leading to the wood, one had the barrel the other had the stock of the gun. I said " I have had a good many runs after you two, now I have got you ", they replied ' We know you have ', and used abusive language. Fine 30s each and 7s 9d costs.

March 29th 1859

On Friday there was a destructive fire on the premises of Mr Charles Petitt at Mount Bures. 2 large barns, stables, sheds, 2 stacks of barley, 2 stacks of hay and several pigs and fowls were burnt.
A number of valuable horses nearly shared the same fate, damages is estimated to be about 1000L.
We understand a travelling medicant is in custody on suspicion. He called at the house for charity and was refused, it is supposed he caused the fire in revenge.

March 29th 1859

Robert Ward a retailer of beer in Poslingford was charged with allowing beer to be drunk on his premises. Thomas Youngman deposed, I called at his premises and found 15 people smoking and drinking in there. Fined 14s 9s and 11s costs.

March 29th 1859

William and Robert Mayes, David Cornell, David Clarke and James Philips, labourers of Barnardiston were charged with throwing off several gates in Lt Wratting. Dismissed.

March 29th 1859

At Suffolk Lent Assizes. Philip Nunn pleaded guilty to setting fire to a barley stack the property of Mr Smith of Glemsford. Sentence deferred.

March 29th 1859

Thomas Sore, aged 16 years was indicted for rape at Bildestone on Emma Smith, age 10 or 12 years, guilty but the jury recommended mercy but His Lordship sentenced him to two years hard labour.

April 5th 1859

There was an inquest on the death of Mr William Garret of Pound Hall in Melford and formerly of Borley Mills. The deceased gentleman was in his usual good health on Monday evening and nothing further was ascertained respecting him till the following morning when not appearing at his accustomed time, one of the inmates of the house entered his bedroom and found the vital spark had fled. Mr R.Jones Esq, surgeon was immediatley sent for and on his arrival he stated he had no doubt his life had been extinct for several hours. He was nearly a cripple from rheumatism and Mr Jones stated he had ascertained when attending him for some trifling ailment, that he had an organic heart disease of the heart. Natural causes.

April 12th 1859

At a meeting of the trustees of Clare school held on Thursday last, Mr Philip Last of Blackheath was elected master thereof, the school will open in July.

April 19th 1859

Letters to the Editor

Sir,
 I am told that when Sir Robert Buxton ( the Conservative candidate for Bury) was canvassing a voter last week, that Sir Robert was in the habit of requiring his cottage tenants to undertake to attend church also to take the Holy Sacrament and further that Sir Robert requires the preacher on Rushford Green to desist from preaching on Rushford Green.
Sir Robert does not deny this statement and as to compelling his cottagers to be communicants at the parish church he defended it by saying "it is one of the rights of private property" on his estate at Brettenham.

Signed an elector of Bury St Edmunds.

April 19th 1859

Thomas Jolly a labourer of Hundon was charged with furiously riding a horse at Stradishall.
Mr John Jardine said he was driving his gig at Stradishall when defendant passed him at a furious rate upon a horse without a bridle. Defendant said he had nothing to say. Fined 20s and costs.



April 19th 1859

James Johnson of Pentlow was convicted for being drunk on Sunday night the 3rd inst at Cavendish.
5s with 6s 6d expenses.

May 3rd 1859

Inquest at Hitcham White Horse on William Gooch aged 39. William Death, a man in the employ of Mr Mark Major said the previous Thursday week the deceased came to work with the threshing machine belonging to Mr Russel and late in the day witness saw deceased trying to see if the machine would go well with his hands as the horses were not put on yet, and in doing so in a most careless manner he got his hands entangled in the cogs and a finger was crushed.
Mr Growse, surgeon of Bildeston said he examined his hand and found it necessary to amputate a finger and he dressed another and was going on well, last Friday morning he was sent for and found evidence of lockjaw, he died next day.
He left a wife and 5 children.
Accidental Death.

May 3rd 1859

Inquest at Hundon on the 26th ult at the Lion Inn on Susan Mayes, a woman of 54 years. It appears deceased had been suffering from scrofula for four years. Mr Stutter, surgeon, said he was called in by a neighbour, Frances Murkin, he found her in a debilitated state and recommended her to go to the Union House, he gave her a dose and said send for the parish doctor, a neighbour called at 9 o' clock and got no answer, the two women went upstairs and found her dead in bed. Her son had gone to Clare to see the parish doctor.

May 3rd 1859

Clare new school was opened.

May 10th 1859

There is now in Sudbury Union House an aged woman who claims the honour of being with her husband on board the Victory, Nelson's flag ship at the battle of Trafalgar. The old heroine is in her 78th year and is a native of Stoke by Nayland, her maiden name was Susan Olley. She had married an Irish seaman who served aboard the Victory at Trafalgar but was afterwards drowned in an accident. She states that during the battle she was stationed near the powder magazine and was employed during the action in receiving and handing cartridges to boys who carried them to the guns.
If her tale be true and it appears there is little doubt, surely something ought to be done to add to the comfort in her old age of one who served her country in the greatest naval victories that graces the English annals.



May 17th 1859

There was an incendiary fire at Groton on Saturday afternoon, the alarm was given at 2 am. Was at "Mannings farm" belonging to Mr Strutt, the whole premises was on fire and was a mass of flames, barns,cowhouse, all new in a few years and the house (an old one),several straw stacks, and stover stacks, fortunately someone entered to let the bullocks out of the yard, the poor yard dog being chained up was unfortunately burned to death.
The Boxford fire engine attended and kept the flames from a large wheat stack. Three lads have been apprehended on suspicion

May 31st 1859

Free Grants of Land of 40 to 5000 acres or upwards. Under new regulations of the Auckland government and for the purpose of attracting a good population of this country-farmers-graziers-traders-retired officers-professional men, etc. The passenger packet the "Spray of the Ocean" , this magnificent British built clipper, sails from London on June 1st calling at Plymouth to take West Country passengers.

May 31st 1859

On Tuesday last,(the Queen's Birthday) the completion of the memorial tower at Pentlow was celebrated in the presence of a party of friends whom the reverend gentleman invited. From the top magnificent views are obtainable, embracing 41 churches, 60 windmills, 2 castles and several large halls and estates.



May 31st 1859

There was a shocking accident at Livermere on Thursday evening when a man named Charles Chittock, in the service of Mr Cooke, farmer, was mortally wounded by one of his master's horses. The poor man was engaged in grooming the animal (a vicious one) in the stall where it was tied up by a halter, when it seized his left arm near the shoulder joint and bit him in a fearful manner, severing the artery and dragging a large portion of muscle through the wound.
The brute then knocked him down and kneeled on his head and other parts of his body, no assistance was in call, he would have been mauled more but he had the presence of mind to seize the animal's tongue, thus preventing it using it's teeth again before he got out of reach. He was conveyed to Bury hospital but it was found impossible to prevent fatal termination.

June 14th 1859

A petition from Cavendish, Suffolk, against the practice of auricular confession was presented in the House of Lords by the Earl of Shaftesbury on Thursday last.

June 14th 1859

, Letters to the Editor.
Memorial tower at Pentlow.
Sir, knowing that your paper is the best medium in this part of the country for giving publicity to the truth and is ready to defend it, I have without hesitation ventured to ask you to allow these few lines to appear in your columns.
I have frequently heard many rumours concerning the tower which the Rev John Bull has erected at Pentlow in memory of his much lamented father, among the most absurd are the following viz: That is unsafe owing to a rent from the battlements downwards and that it deviated from the perpendicular considerably, as I felt anxious to test the veracity of those statements made I induced a friend upon whose judgement I could depend to accompany me to Pentlow, after examining the tower from every possible way without finding the slightest fault either in it's architecture or anything else respecting it for it is handsome and clever construction, we arrived at the conclusion that who circulated these absurdities and not the tower must have been rent at the top and deviated from the original intention of his Maker.
Yours truly,
CR. J. and A.H. (Clare).

June 14th 1859

Frederick Boreham of Glemsford was charged with unlawfully fishing on the river running through Mr John Smith's land, defendant was laying eel lines, 10s 6d with 7s 6d costs. Henry Oakley of Glemsford was charged with unlawful fishing and taking four pike valued at 1s from the river running through the land of Mr E.S.Bence. George Crissel said he saw defendant pull four pike from the water with a pole with a piece of wire and something attached and throwing them across the river to another man. William Boreham was charged with aiding and abetting. 15s and 7s 6d costs.

June 28th 1859

William Mills of Clare pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly at Cavendish fair and assaulting Superintendant Death on the 11th. Fined 10L and 6s 6d costs.

July 5th 1859

On Wednesday last a deputation of silk weavers from London arrived in Sudbury to induce the weavers of this town to operate a movement to obtain an advance in prices. The meeting was held in the Waggon and Horses Inn, there were 200 people present. Mr Spencer explained the reason in calling the meeting and Mr Wade read a list of prices now being paid by velvet manufacturers in Sudbury, which were from 5d to 14d per yard and the difference in London prices. Mr Shepherd then spoke about the umbrella and parasol trade and said there was a difference of 2 d a yard paid in Sudbury and London or a difference of up to 7s 6d a week. In the evening an open air meeting was held on the Croft, the meeting terminating with the formation of a society on the same plan as the London weavers.



July 5th 1859

For sale at Walter Belchamp, Essex. Rippingales Farm. Lot 1-2 parcels of land called East Croft and Pightle field, 7 acres. Lot 2 -Bingto Common 7 acres-Lot 3 Pasture in Church Common 1 acre.

July 5th 1859

Suffolk Quarter Sessions. The committee reported a charge by convict Wright against the cook at Bury Gaol has been fully investigated and they wee of the opinion that no reliance could be paced on the report that Lambert the cook had been carrying meat out of the gaol.

July 12th 1859

Isaac Wordley a labourer from Glemsford was charged of being on land in occupation of Mr Cross of Boxted with a gun. Fined 10s.with 4s 3d costs.



July 19th 1859

Stephen Kiddy, farmer, was convicted and sentenced to 1 month in prison with hard labour for having on the 1st of June feloniously stolen 1 lbs of turnip seed from Mr Joseph Unwin, farmer of Haverhill. Mr Sams of Clare made a powerful appeal to the magistrates on behalf of the prisoner who had borne a good character up to the present time.

July 19th 1859

To be let---Commercial Inn and posting house to be let. The Half Moon at Clare, Suffolk. Excellent stabling-carriage sheds-ample cellarage-extensive trade. Also to be let, a brewery on Bradley Hill, Ashen near Clare, capable of doing a good trade by a industrious person. Apply to Mr Weston at the Half Moon.

July 19th 1859

Sudbury Market-Talaver wheat to 50s-white wheat to 50s-red wheat to 43s-oats to 29s-peas to 43s.

July 26th 1859

Inquest at Finningham on Henry Lummis. John Catchpole said he was with deceased drilling turnips at between 6 and 7 in the morning, two horses were attached to the drill, deceased was leading one and as he turned the drill round the hindmost horse raised his leg with a jerk (it did not kick) the hoof struck deceased in the lower part of the body. The Deceased cried out and seemed very much hurt but got up and afterwards walked home.
Mr William Cuthbert, surgeon of Mendham called to see him on Thursday and found a severe rupture of the bowels and the case was quite hopeless, he died from the blow on Monday. Accidental.

July 26th 1859

p.c. George Grimsey was charged with assault on Alfred Boggis aged 7 years at Gt. Welnetham on the 14th inst. Alfred Boggis said
'I was running the bullocks around on Mr Hilders meadow and had hold of the tail of one, p.c. Grimsey came along and broke a little stick off the hedge and hit me with it, he then "hided" me with his walking stick and made me cry, I ran home.'
 The Bench directed the boy be taken into another room and stripped, the magistrates examined his back and then deliberated and said defendant should be more careful about taking the law into his own hands and they would inflict a fine of 6d on him with 9s costs but they were satisfied the boy got what he richly deserved.

July 26th 1859

Cricket-Bury Abbey v Long Melford. Bury 17 and 50 and 15 and 47. Melford 11 and 72 and 6 and 20 ?. Won by Melford by 7 wickets.

July 26th 1859

Hariett Howe, a girl of 12 years and living at Lawshall was charged with stealing 1lb of horse hair from Mr List a hair manufacturer from London. William Allen deposed, saying,
'I am foreman at the horsehair factory at Lawshall and give out hair to weavers, Caroline Goldsmith has a loom at her house where the prisoner serves her, Goldsmith having missed some hair told me about it. '
Fined 8s or 21 days.

July 26th 1859

James Ross, a seaman who had deserted his ship, H.M.Agamemnon, was charged with begging at Melford. To be returned to his ship.

August 9th 1859

As Joseph Hearn, the postman for Henny was passing through the village on Sunday morning, he was suddenly attack by Samuel Tuffen, a labourer who is out of his mind. The madman ran at him with a bludgeon and attempted to strike him but he eluded the blow and fled into a cottage nearby. The maniac was secured but escaped and was found next morning in the river near the Swann Inn. After medical advise he was sent to the lunatic asylum.

August 9th 1859

George Cutmore a labourer of Poslingford was charged with stabbing Joseph Ince at Poslingford. Ince said I live at Clare and was at Ward's beerhouse at Poslingford, I went at 5 and left at 10, a man named Twitchett and the prisoner left at the same time. Twitchett was thrown down the steps and I went to see what had happened, Cutmore wanted to fight me, I was struck and returned the blow when he struck me again with something and I felt blood trickling down my leg. Twitchett had said he could beat all Poslingford men and put them in his pocket.
Walter Cutmore was offended by this remark and wanted to fight Twitchett, there were about 20 people in the beerhouse and Twitchett was thrown down the steps. John Ward, the beerhouse keeper, said there was a quarrel between Ince and the prisoner and he turned them out of his house and said Ince came up to the prisoner and "catched him on the side of the face a good whisker of the head". Aquitted.

August 16th 1859

Inquest at Stoke by Clare on William Ince aged 14 years.
William Cudby, labourer, in the employ of King Viall said the previous Monday he was engaged with other men stacking wheat when Quy Viall, the son of his master was on the stack as he was accustomed to.
He was forking sheaves to witness and other men and the point of his fork caught deceased in the eye, the boy fell down and witness picked him up, deceased was then taken home but came to work a short time next day.
Quy Viall was not quite right in his mind but quite harmless. Mr Simpson, surgeon said the internal shell of his eye was much injured causing inflammation.
Verdict accordingly.

August 23rd 1859

To be sold-valuable live and dead stock upon the Cottage and Kiln farms at Melford on instructions from Capt Bence.

August 23rd 1859

George Baker was charged with unlawfully releasing a certain horse while on it's way to the pound at Thurston, defendant said he had leave to put the horse where he did on the grass but the Rev Anderson said no-one had leave. Fined 40s.

August 23rd 1859

Married at Wickhambrook Independent Chapel-Mr A.E. Jackson, tailor and draper of Clare to Eleanor 4th daughter of Mr Simon Moore of Swan's Hall, Hawkedon.

August 30th 1859

On Thursday afternoon fire broke out in a shed adjoining the shop occupied by Mr Argent, blacksmith of Nethergate Street Clare, but from the praiseworthy exertions of Messrs Deeks and Hayward and their men, it was extinguished without much damage, it is supposed the origin of the fire was a spark from the blacksmith's shop. It is to be hoped the owner will repair the shop as the properties adjoining are made endangered by it's being in a dilapidated state.



September 6th 1859

At Melford Petty Sessions. Robert Crouch, town crier of Melford was charged with assaulting Joseph Debenham of Ballingdon in the Hare Inn at Melford, the complainant said that about 6 in the evening he was in the taproom of Hare Inn talking to two men, (Hurrell and Atkins) when defendant came up to the door with a bell on his arm, plaintiff tapped the bell with his stick, defendant said
'Don't do that again or I will smash you!'
Plaintiff tapped again and Crouch struck him with the bell and knocked him insensible, plaintiff then got up and collared him and threw him on the floor.
1s fine for assault and 10s 6d costs.

September 6th 1859

A young man name Muggeridge left the railway station at Sudbury where he worked and proceeded down Friars Street to a lane called Scarlin's Walk where he went to the river Stour and drowned himself. A disappointed love affair was the cause. At the inquest, Thomas Owers of the Railway Bell said deceased lodged with him and when drunk had a portrait of his daughter in his hand which he frequently kissed, when the body was found he had a portrait of Miss Owers tied to it. Temporary insane. The deceased was nearly related to the Sheriff of London.

September 27th 1859

Died on the 12th inst at Chevington-Frances Harris a very aged woman who for many years imposed on the credulous by her reputed witchcraft until the magic implements containing her "spells" was destroyed by the request of Lord Arthur Harvey and Lord Alfred Harvey.
 Her exact age cannot be certain but it appears from the parish records of Hargrave that she was baptized in 1763 and she has often stated she well remembers walking three miles to church in pattons to be christened, she will therefore probably be 103 at least.

September 27th 1859

Colne Valley and Halstead Railway. We believe we may confidently inform our readers that the above railway from Chapel to Halstead has been leased by a responsible party for 7 years at an annual rent of 2000.

September 27th 1859

Sale of live and dead stock at Potters Farm, Acton, by order of Mr Oliver Brand who quitting the farm.

September 27th 1859

James Twitchett a labourer of Stoke by Clare was charged with assaulting Mary Houldgate who said her husband keeps the Millers Arms at Clare and is also a miller on 27 acres. Witness said
"4 men came into our house and had 7 quarts of beer and some chops, they afterwards disputed the reckoning and knocked me and my husband down."
Fined 2L.

September 27th 1859

On Tuesday last the annual fete and exhibiton of garden produce was held at Boxted Hall in the beautiful park. The attendance of gentry and others was numerous. Longest servitude with good character-William Blackshire aged 65 with 45 years service, 1.
John Bruce 76 served 44 years 15s. William Rayner with 43 years, 12s 6d.
Potatoes-D.Middleditch-Onions H.Claydon-Carrots T.Hunt- Parsnips, Granger.Cabbage, D.Wodley.-Lettuce, Rushbrooke.-Celery, Boreham.- Cucumber, Boreham.-Peas, Wodley.-French Beans, Gowers.- Horseradish, Preston.-Collection of vegetables, Briggs.

October 4th 1859

William Byford of Ballingdon a labourer who is in the employ of Mr R.Weston of Ballingdon Hall was charged with beating his wife Eliza. She said during this last fortnight she had suffered much from her husband's conduct, on Friday when he was paid his wages he only brought home 1s and wanted her to go out and buy some mutton to fry for his supper, she remonstrated with him and he struck her.
3 months hard labour.

October 4th 1859

Charles Brown was charged with committing an assault on Maria Hartley aged 8 years. 4 months hard labour.

October 4th 1859

William Goodey and Nether Clarke of Glemsford were charged with carrying a certain fire on a stick on the highway at Glemsford. Fined 15s and cautioned about the danger of which might issue from such practice.



October 4th 1859

The announced intention of Mr Charles Dickens to read two of his most famous productions in Bury, The Christmas Carol and the Trial of Pickwick, has been received with great interest and demand for tickets has been very active. We have been requested particularly to urge upon those who attend the readings for punctuality in arrival and patience in remaining till the close for the sake of his auditory.

October 4th 1859

William Hart was charged with assaulting Ewen Green, bricklayer, it appears that complainant had great difficulty in getting his rent from Hart who owed him 2 12s and that he went into the Ship and Star beershop at Sudbury to get his rent from Hart, Hart used abusive language and hit green on the head and chest. Fined 10s with 11s costs.

October 18th 1859

Died on the 6th of August, off Northumberland, Australia, in attempting to reach the shore from the wreck of Admella, aged 24 years, John Hills of Sudbury.

October 18th 1859

Elijah Whittle of Glemsford was charged with stealing a plough spud, the property of Mr Alston of Stanstead. Charles Wheeler said I work for Mr Alston and was ploughing in a field, when I left off at 3 o'clock the spud was on the plough. The bench took a lenient view and hoped it would be a warning for his future conduct. 14 days in prison.



October 25th 1859

A lad in the employ of Mr Halden jun. of Brook Street farm, Halstead was going to work when he discovered in a field next to the highway leading from Halstead to Sible Hedingham, a stack on fire on top of Brook Street Hill.
The lad ran and awoke his master who immediately dressed and ran to the field towards the stacks, as he went along the field he fancied he heard footsteps on the road going from the fire, the fog was thick and he called out "who is there?".
Hearing no answer he leapt over the hedge and met a man going away from the fire. He interrogated the fellow, his answer was unsatisfactory and he detained him.
Four men came up on the way to work on the Hedingham - Halstead railway and attempted to secure the man, he then drew a knife which one of the men said was up his sleeve; He was however secured and taken to Halstead police station. The Halstead fire engine attended and saved two large wheat stacks valued at 100. The suspect is a perfect stranger aged 25-30 years and gave his name as John Connor. It was plain someone had slept in a straw stack as a snug bed and when the man was found and apprehended he had short straw on his neck. Committed.

November 1st 1859

Fanny Beer of was charged under the Weavers Act with neglecting her work for 8 successive days. James Slater the superintendant of the silk manufacturers Morris and Hughes proved the case but defendant pleaded to be allowed to finish her work. Adjourned.

November 1st 1859

Josiah Johnson a labourer of Cavendish was summoned for assault by p.c.Spinks by kicking his legs. The p.c. said he was on duty at Cavendish Green on Sunday afternoon when near the church gate defendant made low expressions.
"I told him not to use such words and he said 'I will do what I like!'. I took him by the collar and he kicked me twice."
There had been complaints made of disgusting conduct by persons standing on the green on Sunday afternoons. Fined 10s and 7s 6d costs.



November 8th 1859

George Clarry of Gt Saxham was charged with unlawfully using a hingle for the purpose of taking a pheasant. Henry Martin, keeper to Mr W. Mills, said, I was standing on a bank and saw defendant who was "mangeling" for Mr Seeley of Hengrave walk to the hedge on "17 acres", I walked round and found a hingle.
5 or three months hard labour.

November 22nd 1859

On Friday night fire broke out at the Hound Inn in Stradishall by which the house and offices adjoining were completely destroyed and but for the exertions of Mr H.R. Homfray's engine much more of the thatched properties would have fallen to the flames. The landlord, Mr Willis with his two sons a daughter and a niece barely had time to escape. They were hospitably received at Stradishall Place, the mansion of Mr Homfray.

November 22nd 1859

James Hempstead was charged with the rape by a young lady named Fanny Mitchell of Bridge Street, Melford. Evidence was given by two witnesses who heard screaming on the road near High Street, Melford, the evidence is not fit for publication. For trial.

November 22nd 1859

On Tueday last a young lad of 16 years named James Hempstead of Melford was charged by a young woman named Fanny Mitchell of Bridge Street of criminally assaulting her at 11 at night near her home at Bridge Street. The evidence was unfit for the public. Committed for trial.

November 29th 1859

John Risen of Melford was charged with stealing 29 doz. rabbit and hares skins valued at 5L from William Prigg a marine store dealer. To appear at the next sessions.

December 13th 1859

An accident has happened to an old man of between 70 and 80 from Melford named Copsey.
Copsey lived a comfortable life by selling produce from his large garden but as he has paralytic fits his son and daughter in law came to live with him. It was discovered that a large hutch where he kept his clothes and money had been broken into and between 6L and 9L had been taken, there was a hole in the thatch and a broken pane of glass where it is supposed the thief entered, when this was discovered the old man uttered a few words of grief then sat near the fire and died.



December 20th 1859

John Cobbold was charged with stealing two mangolds the property of Mr Francis Hammond of Thurston. The prosecutor said he caught defendant taking mangolds out of his clamp, as there is no footpath there he had no business there. 1 month's hard labour.

December 27th 1859

The Widow Of Trafalgar. The Rev Torlesse of Stoke by Nayland who ventured to express our assurance to be willing to receive any contributions for old Susan Steel, he informs us she is now living in Sudbury where she is allowed outdoor relief and that in consequence of our notice which appeared in our columns has received the following contributions. Duchess Camp 1-Princess Mary 1 etc etc.