The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1858 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive


The news in Britain in 1858

January 12th 1869

There were two chaff cutting machinery accidents at Edwardstone and Groton last week by which two persons named Fisher and Death lost each a finger.

January 12th 1858

Before commencing work on the Colne Valley and Halstead railway line, the directors determined that a minimum capital of 150,000 should be subscribed, this sum has been raised and the construction is to be proceeded with.

January 12th 1858

The grammar school at Sudbury is to be opened on the 1st of February.

January 12th 1858

Inquest at Groton Fox Inn on Susan Cook aged 58, it appears from evidence of James King, groom, and living next door to deceased, that she was a widow and lived with her deaf and dumb daughter.
On the previous Wednesday he and his wife were at dinner when they heard a noise which they afterwards found was made by deceased going down, on going in they found deceased on the floor but she could not speak, they applied vinegar to her forehead and hands but she died in a of and hour.

January 19th 1858

Letters to the Editor

Sir,
 Your correspondent last week omitted to mention the nuisance which is increasing daily, not only do the wild horses (ignorant of the terrors of our magistry) run along the pavements to avoid the mud, fit only for Hippopotami, but it has become common occurrence to meet wheeled carriages on our footpaths, I allude to those vehicles known as perambulators which drive the unfortunate pedestrian into the gutter, not only with babies in them but grown up perambulators with a lady in them and driven by a sturdy boy who charges along the pavements with determination of a Highland Brigade, surely Alphense the Strong,( the sturdy page) may exercise his limbs in the roadway.
Yours sincerely, from one who wants to know
 "Bury".

January 19th 1858

The skins of five sheep stolen from the farm of William Taylor of Stanton were discovered at Combs. The person in possession of the skins said he bought them from Mr Chapman of Botesdale, Chapman who keeps the Cock Inn is a butcher as well, he was apprehended and remanded till Thursday. Chapman who states he bought the skins from a man he did not know was Joseph Rooks who was committed.

January 19th 1858

At Clare Petty Sessions, John Ruse of Hundon was charged with assaulting p.c. Greengrass on the morning of the 13th inst. p. c. Greengrass was ordered to see Mr Cuthbert (who had been taking the great tithe for Jesus College, Cambridge) , on his way home he was followed by Ruse and was pushed with a stick and dragged away from Mr Cuthbert. Fined 40s and 11s costs. John Ince from Clare, Charles Clarke from Hundon and G. Jefferies from Cavendish were fined 5s for being drunk.

January 26th 1858

Tenders for rebuilding part of Belchamp Walter church must be delivered sealed to Mr John Raymond, church warden, by February 12th.

February 9th 1858

James Chapman, innkeeper of Alpheton was charged with being drunk and creating a disturbance on Sunday evening at Bury. p.c.
Chaplin said he was on duty at the meat market at about 1 o' clock on Sunday morning near the Woolpack Inn, he heard a noise and saw the ostler who told him the landlord of the Inn had a man who refused to go, he went in and saw the man who said
"who the h--- are you, are you one of these new policemen, I can shake a hand over you for I know Col Ray".
Defendant afterwards apologised and said he would pay 5s towards the police superannuation fund and expenses of 13s.
The Mayor allowed the case to be settled without conviction.

February 16th 1858

Partrick M'Nully, an Irish cattle dealer was charged with causing a disturbance at the Bell at Bury and disputing with a man who was demanding 2s 6d for his days work was fined 1s with 1s costs, he left the court protesting that he would "look after" the policeman.

February 16th 1858

Deaths---Killed before Delhi-George Field a Pay Sergeant of the artillery and head draughtsman and eldest son of Mr John Field of Bildeston.

February 16th 1858

Bury-Sudbury turnpike road-tenders for repair to be received for 1 years contract are required to be in by 6th of March. The contractor will be bound to keep the road in thorough state of repair and subject to inspection by Sir James McAdam (was this the McAdam of tarmacadam?. G.H..) or such persons as trustees appointed.

February 16th 1858

At Sudbury market - White wheat-49s to 54s per quarter. Red wheat-40 to 49s. Rivets wheat-39 to 42s. Grinding barley 34-36s. Malting barley-38 to 41s. Oats-24 to 28s. Mazagan-36 to 40s.
Grey peas-40 to 44s.



February 16th 1858

Letter received by Mr Bantock of Ixworth from his son in Australia.
Dear Father and Mother,

 I received your kind letter quite safe and pleased to hear you are all happy and in good health, I am happy to say we are all well thanks to the Almighty for this is I can assure you is a happy healthy country and I wish you were all here.
We are in a free healthy colony, the voyage was over mighty deep waters, like a dream although we are 16000 miles away from our birth place and friends and family.
We want for nothing, we have a good home, I am carrying on business from my own premises and obtain a good livelihood. I can assure you Ballarat is quite a large town and the arrivals of people everyday is surprising, we are all mixed up with all classes of people, there are Chinese, Turks, Jews, Irish, Germans, Greeks, French and English.
There are 1000's of acres in the colony uncultivated, it would be quite a treat to see a field of wheat, as to hedges, it is out of the question, it is nice grass country, beautiful soil and well timbered, the timber is red and white gum, the white gum sheds it's leaves every winter, we have plenty of opposums, kangaroos, native cats and flying squirrels etc in abundance (but no pheasants or rabbits) which is generally the food the natives live on, parrots in abundance which provide fine sport for the diggers who shoot them in their spare time, if we knew where there was gold we would dig down a hole for it.
The diggers work day and night with good heart and are as happy as sand boys, we have no workhouses, overseers or poor people here for here is a good living for everyone who tries to obtain it. We often think we would like a drop of your good old English ale, they charge for a glass of beer (or so they call it) one shilling and regular trash it is.
We have a good herd of cows, oxen etc and the liberty to keep them out in the bush, it is winter here now (as they call it), we scarcely see any snow nor ice which is as thick as a sixpence when we do, but the sun is very powerful. Some people have great luck and make a "pile" in a quick digging. I now have two a fine horses and two colts which I am breaking in, I have several first rate bred pigs, I bought a horse, bridle and a riding habit for my wife, I gave 20 for the turn out without the horse. I hope to have a letter from you in the next mail. I conclude with best wishes for your happiness with the hope of seeing you once more.
Your ever affectionate Son,

Alfred Bantock.

February 16th 1858

Inquest at Wissington on Edward Clarke aged 12. Isaac Watts aged 17 said
'I work for Mr Houghton, deceased and I were carting straw about 9-45 yesterday morning with a tumbril and horse, we just got into the yard, deceased was on the load, he spoke to the horse while I shut the gate, the horse stopped and he fell off, he said "oh dear", when I turned him over one of the prongs of the fork was stuck under his jaw, I called John Southwood who was nearby and I ran off for a doctor
',
Deceased lived for one hour.
Accidental Death.

March 2nd 1858

James Payne, a labourer of Brockley was charged with leaving a wagon and four horses in Westgate road in Bury on the 23rd inst. Supt. Utting said two wagons and with four horses each were left with no-one in charge of them outside the George public house, defendant said he only went in for some yeast and had not been in there long, he worked for Mr Sergeant of Brockley Hall.
P. C. Vickers said both men were convicted for driving without reins five months ago. David Albon, labourer of Brockley, companion of the last defendant pleaded guilty to the same charge. Both discharged with a caution and 7s 6d costs each person.

March 2nd 1858

To be sold at Middleton near Sudbury---valuable building material from the pulling down of a mansion and farm buildings, late in occupation of Thomas Moss esq, also 1500 capital fir and other trees.

March 2nd 1858

For sale at Glemsford-The Angel Inn free house with cottage and garden in Egermont street, now in occupation of Joseph Copsey.

March 2nd 1858

An alarming fire broke out in a cottage in Broom Street, Great Cornard which is about a mile from Sudbury, by that time that and seven other cottages were laid in ruins and another was pulled down to stop the progress of the flames which it was feared at one time the whole street would be burned, the wind being very strong, it was carrying burning thatch a considerable distance.
There was barely time to remove a dead man from one of the cottages and he was placed in a field nearby before the roof fell in. The fire was occasioned by burnt soot falling on the thatch. Four of the cottages were new buildings and owned by Mr Joseph Brand, late of Chilton, the others were owned by a respectable young woman, the servant of Mr Bevan. All were thatched.

March 2nd 1858

On Wednesday last, Alfred Feist, late master of Newington workhouse was charged with the disposal of bodies of paupers for the purpose of dissection for profit, the remains of the dissected bodies being substituted for other deceased paupers so the mourners instead of following the remains of their own relatives to the grave followed some other person.
Guilty but no sentence passed on sureties to appear and receive judgement is a question of the law.

March 9th 1858

Inquest at Troston on the illegitimate female child of Maria Ager. Mary Anne, wife of James Channel, stated deceased was the fourth illegitimate child of her sister, Maria Ager, and had a cold since it's birth.
On Saturday the receiving officer for Ixworth sent for a doctor but about 7 next morning the child was dead. The mother of the child said she suckled deceased twice on Saturday night in bed but when she woke on Sunday morning the child was dead on her breast. Accidental suffocation.

March 9th 1858

Seven cottages to be sold at Gestingthorpe, Essex, by order of the executors of Mary Bocking at the Compass Inn, Gestingthorpe, they are situated on the high road from Halstead to Clare and are in the occupation of Bowers, Carter, Daniels, Bocking, Plamplin, Corder and Hurrell, they are producing 21 2s per annum.

March 16th 1858

Died at Sudbury on the 18th inst aged 80 years-William Hibble.
In the early part of his life he was a midshipman on board the Venerable (74 guns) and commanded by Admiral Duncan at the battle of Camperdown on the 11th October 1797, in July 1801 he was engaged on board the same ship with the French and Spanish fleets at the battle of Algesirain, Gibraltar.
After the Peace of 1801 he enlisted in the Essex Militia and was made a Sergeant and placed in 1814 on the staff of that regiment, after a few years he was rewarded with a pension for life.

March 16th 1858

Inquest at Market Weston on James Annis, labourer aged 18. Barnard Jarret deposed, 'I work for Mr Grimsey, deceased was working in a marl pit, I was working in a barn nearby, Between 2 and 3 in the afternoon I heard a noise of a falling, I ran to the pit and saw deceased lying with his head just out of the earth, Steggles who was working with him was trying to pull him out but another fall of earth came and knocked Steggles down, the tumbril was smashed, I ran for help'.
It was near 1 hours before he was dug out, he was quite dead and Steggles was much injured and there is no hope of recovery. Mary Anne Pace said the pit was in Thelnetham but deceased was a Hepworth man. Accidental.

March 16th 1858

On Tuesday afternoon a fatal accident occurred at Middleton near Sudbury, a man named Piper was engaged in loading a wagon with chalk in a pit when the earth above caved in and he was killed on the spot.

March 16th 1858

At Suffolk Lent Assizes at Bury-Sir William Parker, Mr Nathan Barnardiston, Mr Ellis Walton, Rev Gwilt all qualified and were sworn in as magistrates.


March 23rd 1858

Inquest at Bury Gaol on Maria Mumford. The Matron of Bury House of Correction said deceased was committed last July and was sentenced to 7 years transportation for highway robbery at Melford, when she was committed she complained of a bad cough also about her breath. Mr Hughes, surgeon, said she was consumptive and a verdict was returned accordingly.

March 23rd 1858

Child murder at Oakley
At Suffolk Lent Assizes, Emma Groom was charged with wilfully murdering John Groom her son aged 13 months at Oakley. Mr Durrant stated the motive was she had another illegitimate child living with her mother and to who's support she contributed and in order to escape paying for maintenance of a second child she destroyed it. Sarah Johnson said she was housekeeper to Mr Green at Bramford and the prisoner came into his service in 1856, she received 6 10s yearly. etc-------.
Guilty with a recommendation of mercy. His Lordship exhibited deep signs of emotion when he pronounced the death sentence.

March 23rd 1858

There were extraordinary scenes of the conduct by Supt. Whitcomb at Sudbury on Thursday afternoon, farmers attending the market were thrown into a state of excitement.
It appears that the market contained parties which were showing entire horses which Supt Whitcomb said, on the authority of the magistrates, he has issued a warning to a man named Lane who is ostler to Mr Manby at the Angel Inn, who had an entire in his charge contrary to the bye laws and took him into custody with his entire and a colt.
A crowd of about 2-300 farmers and others congregated near the Town Hall and gave vent to their feelings against Whitcomb who had locked up Lane then went into the crowd where he alleges he was kicked by someone and placed in a cell a young man named Wilkins, a servant at Wiston Hall.
Whitcomb sallied forth again with his staff raised in the air, five or six yards from the Town Hall, Mr Andrews, farmer of Waldingfield, was transacting business with Mr John Downes of Gestingthorpe, the Supt asked him to withdraw as he was setting a bad example , just at this time Mr Brock, a member of Sudbury Town Council came along and asked what was amiss. On being told, he said nonsense, hereupon Whitcomb threatened to take Mr Brock into custody and then put his threat into execution and then commenced a series of assaults on Brock, dragging him by the throat and nearly choking him and smashed his head on the pavement.
The Mayor was immediately appealed to and Mr Brock was discharged with the other prisoners and he ordered Whitcomb to keep the peace towards Brock, he also ordered Whitcomb into the custody of Sgt Chambers.
At a meeting of the watch committee, Whitcomb was suspended and the police were put under the direction of Sgt. Chambers. On Friday morning, Sergeant Sach of the Colchester police was sworn in as Superintendent of Sudbury police. Mr Whitcomb has left the town.

March 23rd 1858

Walter Fulcher, publican, John Cook, carrier, Henry Cauldwell Whelwright were charged with stealing five sheep from Stanton, the property of Mr W. Taylor. Penal servitude for four years.

March 23rd 1858

On Sunday morning a respite was ordered for Emma Groom for execution.

March 23rd 1858

William Wenlock and John Claydon were committed for setting fire to a straw stack at Shimpling Hall.

March 30th 1858

Fire broke out on the premises of Mr Weybrow of Shimpling Hall by which two straw stacks were consumed, two men named John Clayden of Hargrave and William Wenlock of Great Bacton were apprehended on suspicion.

March 30th 1858

On Monday last a fire broke out on the premises of Mr Weybrow at Shimpling Hall consuming two straw stacks. Two men, John Claydon of Hargrave and William Wenlock of Great Bacton were arrested on suspicion.



April 6th 1858

No fewer than three shepherd's huts have been burnt in the district in last three weeks, in one case with the loss of sheep and lambs another lost a sheep dog.
On Sunday morning the shepherd to Mr Sturgeon of Rushbrook left his sheep to get his dinner at his master's, having put coals on the stove in his hovel which was formed mostly of straw and hurdles and it soon took fire and destroyed the dog and all his clothes, last week we reported the case of Mr Ranson of Sproughton being burnt to a cinder in his hut where he had lain down overcome with fatigue from watching his ewes. About a fortnight ago, a hut belonging to Mr Woods of Moulton was destroyed by fire, surely these frequent occurrences will show the farmers the necessity of more caution in the use of stoves.

April 26th 1858

Her Majesty has been pleased to commute the sentence of death on Emma Groom for the murder of her child at Oakley to penal servitude for life.

April 26th 1858

The members of Thurlow Hunt Club held their revival meeting at the Crown Inn at Great Thurlow on the 16th inst, between 40-50 gentlemen, farmers and others attended and subscriptions were volunteered in a liberal manner.
The dinner and wines which was provided by Mr Palmer was excellent. We cordially approve of the everything tending to unite various classes into which society is divided and to make them known more to one another and the hunting field being a place where all who can procure an animal to ride on from Peer to the smallest yeoman, for many equally enjoy a healthful recreation, we are glad that the there is the prospect of hounds meeting oftener in this district than last year.

April 26th 1858

On Saturday morning at about 12, two men, named Briney and Grey were returning from Newmarket to Bury when they found a man's hat, a little within four miles from Bury they found a man on his knees and finding him incapable of talking they lifted him into the cart and took him to the police station.
The police seeing blood running out of his ear sent for a surgeon and he had him removed to Bury hospital, the Supt. suspecting foul play went with the Inspector to Kentford where he learnt the man had been drinking.
The following morning he left hospital, he said his name was Henry Hymus and that he had left Cambridge on Saturday morning for Gt. Blakenham, Ipswich, and stopped at Kentford for refreshment and had four quarts of beer and 6d of brandy, on leaving Kentford his hat had blown off, when he jumped down he became insensible until waking up in the hospital minus six or seven shillings.

April 26th 1858

Every lover of cricket will be pleased to know the Hon. Grimston has proposed to repeal the law 10 in cricket and substitute the following, " the ball must be bowled, if thrown, jerked or if the bowler shall raise his hand or arm above the shoulder, the umpire shall call "no ball".

May 4th 1858

As Henry Strutt was taking up some eel lines with some creepers near Ladies Bridge at Sudbury he drew up the body of an infant wrapped in a dark handkerchief. The verdict of the jury was wilful murder.



May 11th 1858

Inquest at Cavendish on Henry Loveday aged 78.
It appears deceased worked for Mr Viall of Cavendish and lodged with William Brown and his wife at an off hand farm of Mr Viall's, he was heard making a noise a few minutes past 8 on Tuesday morning, Mrs Brown thought he was getting up, his sons came into breakfast about 5 minutes afterwards and his grandson went up to call him and found him a corpse. Mr T. Waring, surgeon. said it was Natural Death.

May 18th 1858

Died at Yanko, New South Wales, James, third son of Mrs Rogers and formerly of Euston.
Also on the 16th of February at Richmond near Melbourne, Ausralia, Susan, wife of Wallis King, formerly of Hartest, Suffolk.

May 18th 1858

At a meeting of Suffolk Agricultural Association held at the White Horse in Ipswich on Tuesday last, a vote of thanks was passed to Bury Town Council for their handsome offer of the cricket ground and playing field adjoining for the use of the association on July 7th which was gladly accepted.

May 18th 1858

At Melford Petty Sessions the following were convicted on information from the Inspector of weights and measures. Harriet Cooke grocer of Shimpling, 4 light weights-fined 2.-Charles Nunn of Stanstead, grocer, 7 light weights-5--- George Bray brook of Cavendish, pork butcher, for 4 light weights, 5---Lucy Sparke of Shimpling, one false balance, grocer, 2---William Pearman of Glemsford, grocer, one false balance 1 1s.

May 18th 1858

Hadleigh Farmers Club Show.
George Barton for having brought up 11 legitimate children receiving only 3 in parochial relief which was in consequence of a tree falling on him and disabling him for 10 weeks, 2.---
William King having brought up 15 children legitimate children and never receiving parish relief except when wife was confined 2.
Ploughmen-Edward King 2-William Sage, 1-10s . Class 2-Thomas Baylam-1-10s----Henry Green 1. Plough boys best-Richard Pearson 1-2nd George Lloyd -15s. The three first ploughmen are all in the employ of Mr Boutell of Boxford and have been taught by himself how to plough.
Best stallion-William Wilson of Baylam Hall etc etc--.

May 25th 1858

For sale tomorrow, a farm called Hart's Green in Lawshall and Stanningfield 30 acres, occupied by James Last---Trees farm at Lawshall 75 acres, occupied by Mrs Jackson.-- Farm is situated in Shimpling and Alpheton on the Sudbury turnpike road , occupied by George Deeks, 45 acres. A fourth part of Bush farm situated in Lawshall and Whepstead, occupied by James Prewer, 20 acres.

May 25th 1858

Death---at the camp before Lucknow-John the third son of Mr Stevens, aged 27 years, formerly of the White Lion, Hadleigh.

June 1st 1858

Joseph Nott a young farmer from Pebmarsh was summoned by Mr Cardinal, auctioneer of Sudbury, for having used threatening and abusive language towards him on the 25th inst at the market in Sudbury, it being proved by the complainant and a man named Hostler of Mill Hill, Sudbury.
The defendant made use of terms calculated to make a breach of the peace and this had been done in other towns as well as Sudbury.
Fined 5s.

June 1st 1858

A robbery has been committed at Mr Wheeler's Half Moon in Gregory Street in Sudbury.
Mr Sach, Supt, made inquiries found the till had been robbed of about 1 in silver the previous evening, Mr Wheeler did not make the police aware but questioned the delinquent himself but to no purpose, If the police had been made aware the offence would have been brought home to the thief.

June 2nd 1858

On Wednesday, Mr and Mrs Meadows the master and mistress of St.Andrews school at Halstead had with their child spent the day at Bures with Mr Macartney the master of the Union school accompanying them on horseback.
In the evening Mrs Macartney went a short distance on the road to meet them, she mounted the hind seat of cart to ride home with them when it is supposed the pressure of the belly band caused the horse to rear and plunge forward violently, dashing Mrs Macartney to the ground and killing her instantly. The frightened horse finding itself without a driver set off at a fearful rate throwing Mr Meadows out also, the horse dashed down the hill in the town and over the bridge when it came in contact with some cottages throwing mother and child to the ground, although considerably injured they are not seriously hurt.
Accidental death on Mr Macartney.

June 2nd 1858

Joseph Nott a farmer of Pebmarsh was summoned by Mr Cardinall the auctioneer of Sudbury for using abusive and threatening language to him, it was proved by Mr Hostler of Mill Hill, Sudbury that defendant made threats and breached the peace. Fined 5s with 14s 6d costs.

June 2nd 1858

The supply of cattle at Melford fair was somewhat larger than usual, but of ordinary quality, accordingly few sales were made. The greatest attraction was the steam driven machinery.

June 8th 1858

On Thursday last a serious accident happened at the new chapel being built at Ridgewell, a man named Thomas Dalton a labourer from Sudbury in the employ of Mr Webb was ascending the ladder and when he reached the scaffold he lost his balance and he fell 24 feet breaking his thigh.

June 8th 1858

For many years the inhabitants of Sudbury have been accustomed to enjoy the boating and quiet walks by the river bank. Since the warm weather these have stopped especially for the females as assemblages of young men in Friars meadow are dabbling in the water quite nude. These nuisances must be stopped by the police.



June 12th 1858

During the intensely hot weather of last week a young lad named Hammond died at Exning, Suffolk after a short illness from an abscess. The surgeon who attended him on learning of his death said to who brought him the intelligence "bury the corpse immediately, let there be no delay, don't trifle with time"
This counsel was disregarded and the house became un bearable and the family had quit and take their meals next door, the woman who laid him out had greatest difficulty in her task and even with the assistance of brandy she could hardly complete the task and was so ill she took to her bed. It is quite evident the body was decomposing rapidly.
There are cases of fever originating from one house not a stones throw from Hammond's cottage and the Parson said "I must decline to have the body in the church".

June 22nd 1858

On Thursday last, it was discovered that two stones of lead have been removed from Glemsford church porch, the lead which bore the date "1838" had been seen safe the previous Monday by the Sexton.

June 22nd 1858

The first exibition of Essex Agricultural Association took place at Chelmsford on Tuesday and realised in every way the most sanguine expectations of the promoters of the show both as regards the numbers and quality of the animals which were first rate and the competition was spirited, the weather was brilliant and the company was both numerous and influential.

July 6th 1858

Inquest at the Three Tuns Inn at Cowlinge on Martha Webb aged 4 years. Ellen Beeton deposed the deceased was the child of Henry Webb and it's mother was dead, she lived there.
Mr Stutter, surgeon, said the convulsions were probably caused by worms of which he saw several.
Natural Death.

July 20th 1858

Advert drawing attention to Charles Burrells traction engine. .
This engine is capable of drawing a threshing machine over rough roads or where there is no roads with only one horse in the shafts to steer the engine. This improvement is a great measure which removes the difficulty in the likelihood to collide when passing horses on the highway.

July 20th 1858

At Bury Petty Sessions-
John Hammond, a ticket of leave man who was sentenced to 15 years transportation in 1851 for arson at Risby was charged with disorderly conduct.
P.C.. Chaplin said defendant was lying in the road the previous night in Hatter Street, Bury, he got up and struck a woman two or three times, on hearing the woman scream he went to the scene and he tried to persuade defendant to go home but then took him into custody. The Mayor said he must enter into sureties to keep the peace and if brought before the court again he would in all probabilities be sent back to complete his sentence.

July 20th 1858

The third meeting of Suffolk Church Mission to the Roman Catholic Church was held at Shimpling by kind permission of the Misses Hallifax in Chadacre Park.

July 20th 1858

Fire broke out at Bois Hall, Halstead, Essex on Saturday morning, the home of Mr John Sudbury, farmer. It appears the farm men were employed in the stackyard threshing by steam when a spark from the engine caught the straw alight and spread to an adjoining stack of fine hay valued at 20.

July 27th 1858

For Sale-Cloggs Farm, Gt Cornard, 50 acres in occupation of Mr Carrington, dwelling house and cottages. Gatehouse farm in Middleton and Gt Henny, close to the highway and a navigable river, 150 acres with farm house and buildings, windmill and cottages. At Bures St Mary, small farm called Little Bevills, 55 acres in occupation of Mr Howlett.

July 27th 1858

At Sudbury Petty Sessions, Thomas Clary of Bulmer was fined 20s for ill treating a horse belonging to Mrs Allen of Ballingdon by tearing the roots of it's tongue with a piece of string, also 6s 6d costs.

July 27th 1858

An unusual accident happened a few days ago to a horse belonging to Mr W. Gatward at Great Maplestead. The animal which was in the stable was irritated by flies which it tried to rid itself of by scratching with its hind foot as well as with its mouth, the two extremities were thus in contact when the fetlock got entagled with its teeth, although the animal threw itself to the ground it could not untangle itself till Mr Garwood arrived and freed it.

August 3rd 1858

Clock House farm, Glemsford was sold to George Oliver Brand for 6000L.

August 3rd 1858

A Shorthorn bull shewn by Mr Jonas Webb at Chester has been purchased for Adelaide in Australia also several of his Southdown rams have been purchased for Col. Morris of New York.

August 3rd 1858

Inquest at Lawshall on James the son of William Farrow, labourer. who stated
"deceased is my child and is about 5 years old, I was at Mr George Cornish's of Lawshall brewing my harvest beer and deceased was with me in the brewhouse playing with a servant girl of about 13, I saw the girl push him back into the tub of boiling hot beer, deceased was much scalded, I stripped his clothes off and his skin was scalded off."
 Accidental.

August 10th 1858

Died--- at Mill Hill Farm, Glemsford, after a few months illness, Mary Anne aged 17 years, the only daughter of William Sadler of Mill Hill.

August 10th 1858

James Wells, a labourer employed by Joseph Byford at Melford, while in the harvest field on Thursday last, complained of pain in the right arm and about 9 pm retired to bed and about 3 in the morning died. The inquiry was adjourned till Tuesday as the jury were not satisfied.

August 10th 1858

On Sunday evening, Benjamin Johnson a lad of 15 drowned while bathing with another lad named Howe at the Old Mill, Stanstead, belonging to Mr Alston. At the inquest at Stanstead on Benjamin Johnson it was stated that deceased and another lad named Macdonald Howe who said they were bathing in the river, deceased got in and put a faggot of rushes under his chest to try and swim, they parted after a few yards and he sank, he ran for deceased mother who lived nearby.
 Henry Hurrel said he heard the alarm and searched with a pole and creepers, he undressed and swam about and dived into a hole where he found the body. Accidental.

August 27th 1858

Died at Brettenham Rectory-The Rev. Samuel Cole, aged 93 years, for 60 years Rector of this parish. For his exertions as Naval Chaplain in suppressing the mutiny of the Nore in 1797, Mr Cole was rewarded with the benefice which he held until his death.

August 27th 1858

At the adjourned inquest on James Wells at Glemsford Cock Inn, Mr Waring surgeon, said he made a post mortem on the body and found violent inflammation of the whole of the right side. Natural Death.

August 27th 1858

At Sudbury County Court. Action was taken for recovery of 1 2s 6d.
 The defendant, William Amey claimed a set off against William Berry, both are cow-keepers at Sudbury. The plaintiff resides in Ballingdon, the defendant in Sudbury.
It appears when defendant first thought about keeping cows, he asked plaintiff to buy him two cows as he had experience in buying and selling and promised to pay him 1 for his trouble, he bought the cows, among the items of the bill there was included 14s 6d for milking and 3s 6d to a free and easy club for defendant, 6d for a broom and a fish and a small sum for half a rabbit.
Defendant said plaintiff undertook to use his judgement in buying the cows for 1, he sold plaintiff a fat calf for 3 10s of which he received 2 10s, the 1 being stopped on account of the agreement. Judgement of 8s 11d to be paid to plaintiff.

September 14th 1858

At California, from the falling of a cave, in his 29th year, William, the eldest son of J.W.Garret of Charsfield.

September 14th 1858

A return made by Mr John Walsham for maintenance in a Union in the district showed that at Sudbury Union it cost 3s per week for food and clothes.

September 21st 1858

Live and Dead Stock for sale by order of Mr George Brand who is relinquishing Slough Farm, Acton. 7 horses-2 cows-110 blackfaced sheep.

September 21st 1858

At Goldingham Hall, Bulmer, by order of Mr John Firmin who is relinquishing the farm. 18 horses-5 two year old chestnut colts-grey nag filly-bay pony-2 milch cows-8 hiefers and steers-1 fat steer-2 year old bull-35 swine-dairy and brewing equipment and implements for 400 acres.

September 21st 1858

County Court. George Welham v Henry Halls, action for damages laid at 50L.
The case for the plaintiff, a 14 year old boy was that he was in the dairy of defendant's father at Lavenham where he was employed, he was asked by the dairymaid to taste the milk to see if it was sour, while doing so, defendant came in and asked him who had been taking the milk, defendant then took hold of a stout stick and violently beat him about the head and back until he was insensible after which he dragged him into the stable and took him home in a cart.
The plaintiff was examined by Mr Barkway a surgeon of Lavenham who said he was suffering from concussion of the brain and in his present state it was impossible to predict the outcome, the plaintiff was examined but became insensible, adjourned.



September 24th 1858

Messrs Blunden and Squire will sell by auction at Goldingham Hall, Bulmer in Essex, by order of Mr John Firman 18 horses-2 young grey nag fillies-bay pony-2 milch cows-9 heifers and steers-2 year old bull-35 swine-brewing and dairy equipment together with implements for 400 acres.

September 28th 1858

For sale at the Soap Office at Glemsford with utensils-fixtures and fittings of the trade, by orders of the executors of the late William Mann-household furniture-implements of trade-two road vans-four trade carts-20 large coppers and pans-30 half hundredweights and other weights-10 iron and wooden soap frames-pumps-cutting machinery etc.

October 5th 1858

A little boy named Charles Bird was charged with entering a certain wood at Drinkstone belonging to Mr Thomas Harcourt Powell Esq. and damaging underwood by picking nuts etc.
To pay 7s 6d in a fortnight or 7 days hard labour.

October 22nd 1858

Inquest at Preston Five Bells on Sarah Lewis, aged 70 who was murdered by her lunatic nephew. The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder. The unfortunate maniac, we understand is 55 years of age and had been discharged from Melton as cured.

October 26th 1858

William Pettit aged 8 was charged with stealing a sovereign from Edward Platt at Oakley, Suffolk. The chairman said he was sorry to see a boy so young begin to steal so soon but he hoped this would be a caution to him.
7 days in prison.

November 2nd 1858

Inquest at Stanstead White Hart on Sarah Clark aged 75 years. Deceased was a widow living alone in a cottage at Stanstead and received support from the village. John Clark, grandson, said he found her dead before the fireplace.
Apoplexy.

November 2nd 1858

A few weeks since, Mr Samuel Jonas of Kentford, Suffolk and lately of Skippers Hall, West Wickham, Cambridgeshire, sent for all his labourers who had been in his employ for many years and presented each man with 15 and to the foreman 20 as a reward for many years of faithful servitude. The joy of these men at this munificent act of Mr Jonas may be imagined.

November 2nd 1858

At Sudbury County Court. Action was taken to recover the sum of 50 as damages from Henry Halls, son of Charles Halls of Lavenham for beating plaintiff Whelan who was a farm lad in his employ.
On the 17th of August last, the case was stopped at the Court in consequence of the plaintiff during examination giving a loud shriek and had a fit. The boy was further examined and he said he was in good health but had once been sent home with a headache, he also stated he was struck severe blows by defendant on his head which knocked him to the ground from which he became insensible.
 Charles Halls the younger had beaten him several times, he might say a score or more. John Brame, the groom to Mr Halls, said he saw defendant strike the boy several times in the yard. 5 was awarded.

November 9th 1858

On Friday last at Stanstead, Suffolk, an interesting affair took place in consequence of Mr Alston having completed 50 years at Stanstead Hall Farm as owner and occupier of the Hall. All the labourers in his employ were regaled with roast beef, plum pudding and old beer, the aged of the village and many others shared his liberality. The village bells were rung.

November 9th 1858

On the anniversary of the gunpowder plot last Friday night, Simon Kilbourne of Stanstead was letting off a cannon when it burst, the staple which fastened it to the block entered his leg, he is going on favourably.

November 9th 1858

On Friday evening last, at Westgate Brewery at Bury, was the scene of some pleasant entertainment. Edward Greene having on the occasion of the completion of the spacious malt house just erected in West Gate Street, gave a supper therein to all the men employed in the brewery and his farm, together with those employed in the erection of the building, upwards of 100 people were present.

November 9th 1858

Inquest at Inworth in Essex on a little boy aged between 2-3 years named Golden Challiss who was walking the previous day with a girl named Sarah Clarke when they met a ram with several ewes without a driver, the ram butted the boy in the face knocking him down and butting him again in the body, he died within a of an hour.
The Coroner was told the ram had run at a man the previous day and Mr Dennis, it's owner, said he intended to properly secure it. Mr Codd the Coroner said he would apprise Mr Dennis of his responsibilities.

November 2nd 1858

At the County Court at Sudbury. Welham v Halls where action was brought to recover 50L damages from Henry Halls a farmer of Lavenham. 5L damages.

November 16th 1858

David Butcher a farm bailiff of Stoke by Clare admitted to the paternity of the bastard child of Matilda Meakins of Stoke by Clare who had been keeping house to defendant. 1s 6d per week.



November 16th 1858

John Maxwell, labourer of Clare, was charged with stealing a chicken valued at 1s 6d from George Goodchild. John Russel, bailiff of Hermitage farm, Clare, said he missed two chickens. Walter Ince, said "I work for Mr Viall and was at plough with defendant in a field adjoining Hermitage farm, two chickens belonging to Mr Goodchild were in the field, the prisoner caught one and killed it".

November 23rd 1858

Mr John Isaacson of Clare having retired from Isaacson and Tattersall in 1855 wishes it to be known that the firm is now dissolved.

November 31st 1858

Sale of brushwood at Acton Place wood 1 acre 2 rods.
Barston Hall wood, Acton, 2 acres. Butlers wood at Bulmer 4 acres. Birch wood, Bulmer 2 acres, Hasell wood, Bulmer, 2 acres, Parsonage wood, Bulmer, 1 acre, Northy wood, Cavendish, 2 acres, Easty wood, Cavendish, 2 acres 2 rods, Waterfield wood, Cavendish, 1 acre 2 rods, Wastefield Grove, Newton, 1 acre.

November 30th 1858

Died at Cowbridge, Glamorganshire, aged 11 years, Ernest the son of Mr G.D. Badham of Bulmer in Essex. Also Sarah, the wife of John Pratt of Otten Belchamp in Essex aged 72.

December 14th 1858

Charles Henley, the driver of the Sudbury-Colchester mail cart, was charged with being drunk and incapable while driving the mail cart.
He had been stopped between Sudbury and Bures by two men who seized his horse. Joseph Barren of Lt. Cornard Said the prisoner passed him as he was walking home, almost driving him into a ditch, soon afterwards he and another young man named Howlet who was accompanying him, over took the prisoner who had stopped his horse and asked for a knife to do something to his lamp, he then threatened Barren with the knife.
10 fine and 1 4s 6d expenses

December 21st 1858

There was a good shew of Turkeys and Geese at Bury Market-Turkeys from 10d to 1s a lb-Geese from 6d to 9d a pound.

December 21st 1858

Last week, Captain Bence and a party of gentlemen, shot (in four days) 3000 head of game on the Kentwell Estate at Melford.

December 28th 1858

Inquest at Nowton near Bury on Robert Cox aged 14 years, labourer on the farm of Mrs Marshal of Nowton, he was drawn into the chaff cutting machine by his frock being caught by the bolts and causing frightful injuries, he died next day in Bury hospital.

December 28th 1858

Thomas Vickers of Shimpling was charged with stealing 10 geese and 14 chickens from Mr George Cornish's farm in Lawshall. Isaac Steward, a dealer from Sible Hedingham, said he met the prisoner at Sudbury and he asked if he would purchase some fowls from him. Witness said he would meet him at Gestingthorpe Compasses on Monday morning.
For Trial.

December 28th 1858

James Maxim and Henry Oakley of Glemsford were convicted of poaching at Cavendish. 1 6s.