The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1858 Bury Free Press newspaper archive

January 2nd 1858

James Savage was convicted under the Criminal Justice Act of stealing a piece of wood valued at 1d from Mr Alfred Pratt Viall of Cavendish the case being clearly proved he was sentenced to 21 days hard labour.

January 2nd 1858

Joseph Humm was charged with assaulting Captain J.G. Parker of Pentlow Hall on the Sudbury road between 12 and 1 on the 11th inst. £4 5s 6d or two months.

January 30th 1858

Clara Frost, a married woman, was charged with assaulting George Murkin of Hargrave on the 15th last. 
Complainant said that he met defendant on the road and she said "well old flowery", he replied "well old slip gallows" upon which she threw some dirt at him, he said "two can play at that game" and threw some at her upon when she flew at him and kicked him.
Defendant said Murkin ill used her. 
The Bench said both will be reprimanded and dismissed the case.

February 6th 1858

Extract from the "Times". 

Died at Lucknow on the 12th of October 1857 from wounds received on the 29th of September when nobly heading a party to bring in some wounded men that had been left behind when General Outram and Havelock forced their way into the Residency on the previous evening.

J.Bensly Thornhill Esq of the Bengali Civil Service aged 25 years and six months, he had got in all the wounded except 12 men and was taking the eldest son of Sir Henry Havelock to a place of safety, as he entered a gate a Sepoy from a house opposite sent a ball through his right arm, he tied it with his handkerchief and went on with his noble duty, when returning the same Sepoy fired again and the ball wounded him in the temple leaving him insensible, he was taken to hospital and his right arm was amputated, he lingered for 16 days then died. 

He left a young widow of 18 years (who is the niece of General Havelock) to mourn the loss of both him and the infant child, her husband got his death with doing a brave humane Christian act and had he lived the highest honour of the Victoria Cross would have been his, this is some consolation to his widowed mother.


The Thornhill family lived at Liston Hall, Essex, near Long Melford, there is a memorial tablet in the church which according to the Rev Brian Sampson is a Piscina which is unusual in a church.
The memorial reads---
"In memory of Robert Bensly Thornhill and Mary White his wife who after 66 days and nights of extreme sufferings were with their children, Charles Cuthbert and Mary Catherine and their faithful nurse Mary Long, cruelly massacred on the 15th of July 1857 at Cawnpore
The righteous perisheth and no man layeth it to hearts and merciful men are taken away none considering that the righteous is taken away from evil to come.
Also on the same Piscina is the following.
"Henry Bensly Thornhill and Emily Heathfield his wife and infant child Catherine who with their faithful nurse Eliza Jennings were
They were lovely and pleasant in their lives and in their death they were not divided"

Some of the dates in the Times extract do not correspond with the Liston Piscina, perhaps understandable. (GH)

February 13th 1858

On Saturday afternoon a serious accident occurred at a shooting match in a meadow at Ballingdon to a young man named Must, a silk winder.
It appears one of the birds being wounded on leaving the trap, Must who had just before come on the ground, attempted to catch it, at the same moment one of the scouts fired and most of the charge lodged in his chest and face.
A considerable amount of shot has been extracted but he lies in a delirious precarious state.

February 20th 1858

The inhabitants of Lawshall are well aware from the style of decoration adopted in the church on the occasion of the late restoration of the church at the expense of the Rev Bailie as well as the manner of conducting the service.
The general manner to whom the spiritual care is entrusted was a member of the Tractarian Section of the Church of England. 
The practices in the church are of a Romanizing tendency that the Protestant feelings of the parishioners became indignant a large majority refusing to attend services. Some months ago Mr Bailie went so far Rome-Ward as to advocate publicly from the circumstances no-one will be surprised that he has placed his resignation of the living in the hands of the Bishop.

February 27th 1858

On Monday last a fatal accident at Hawkedon happened to a man named Cornelious Hurrel who is in the employ of Mr Lee, timber merchant of Bury.
Hurrel and some more men were loading timber on to a drug in Thurston Park Wood, Hawkedon, Hurrel while using a crow bar to hold up a piece of timber it slipped and the chain breaking the timber fell on him, killing him on the spot. Accidently killed. 
Deceased lived in Whepstead and was a steady man of 26 years.

May 22nd 1858

A few days since an amusing incident transpired from the gossips of Lavenham
A sprightly young Knight of the Shears was with intended were taking breakfast at the home of his friend in sight of the church, preparatory to leading her to the altar when just as the time arrived for calling the services of the clergyman the aid of a doctor had to be employed.
Iinstead of the would be bridegroom being presented with a bride he was honoured with an olive branch.

May 22nd 1858

James Windward was charged being drunk and disorderly at Risby on the 9th inst. 
P.C. Tilbrook said that defendant and two more men were drunk and disorderly and creating a disturbance about 8 at night causing a large concourse of people to assemble, 
Windward denied being drunk but P. C. Tilbrook description of events was confirmed by the Parish Constable. To pay 5s and in default to stand in the stocks for 6 hours.

May 29th 1858

There was a fatal accident at Stowmarket, a porter named Sparrow was shunting and he unhooked his two horses when the hinder one became frightened by the Peterborough train which does not stop at Stowmarket
It turned upon the line and the unfortunate man and his horse were run down, the former instantly had his head crushed and died immediately, his horse was badly injured and was put down. 
The man leaves 7 orphan children, his wife having died sometime since.

June 5th 1858

Early Saturday morning last there was a burglary at Alpheton at the home of Mr Crossman, innkeeper, they took a pane of glass out of the back kitchen door and took a table cloth and a paper knife, 
He examined all the drawers but finding nothing repaired to the larder and carried off a leg of pork and a pound of butter there is no clue at present on a lead. 
It is thought that it was the work of someone familiar with the place.

June 5th 1858

Inquest at the White Horse Inn at Withersfield on John Moore, aged 21 years who was killed the previous day.
Deceased was working with a thrashing machine belonging to Mr Gooch at Withersfield Hall occupied by Mr Woolard when one of the "beaters" flew off striking him in the body, he died in two hours.

June 19th 1858

Died at Lucknow from wounds received in action on the 23rd of March. John Peloquith Cosserat, Captain in the 1st Punjab Cavalry and 4th son of the Rev Cosserat, rector of Drinkstone, Suffolk.

June 19th 1858

Edward Adams, gamekeeper at Branches Park Estate was charged by Horatio Bilson, gamekeeper at Ousden-Hill, with stealing pheasant eggs the property of T.J.Ireland. 
Fined 1s 6d which is 3d an egg and 11s costs.

July 3rd 1858

On the 27th ult at 25 Hyde Park Square, to the wife of Capt Starkie Bence of Kentwell Hall, a daughter.

July 10th 1858

Eliza Smee was charged with stealing from Charles Dansie at Melford, one sovereign, ½ a crown and 1s.
Dansie said on the 7th of June he went to Melford, he met defendant in a bar, he asked her to have a drink, when they walked down a lane from the High Street he felt her hand in his pocket.
He charged her with robbing him, he led her to the High Street opposite the Crown Inn, a man came rushing out of the Inn shouting "let her go, she is my wife", the man then struck him on the head, at this moment the prosecutor said he saw the hands of both meet, he thought they may have exchanged money.
He called for a policeman and the man ran away. P.C. Downs said he apprehended Smee who told him he was welcome to search her, witness said he took her to the Inspector's wife for searching but they found nothing but on dressing a half crown fell out of her bosom.
Defendant said the prosecutor asked her to go for a walk and that he put her hand into his pocket and then said "I'd rend your-----out if it was not for the law". 
6 months hard labour.

July 17th 1858

Benjamin Wright, horseman to Mr Byford at Melford was charged with riding on the shafts of a wagon drawn by two horses. 15s 6d with 4s 6d costs.

July 17th 1858

Walter Brunning , Clement Theobald Junior and Wiloughby Ambrose, all of Melford were charged by P.C.Dowse with being drunk and disorderly. 5s each with 7s 6d costs.

August 21st 1858

Mr Andrews junior, farmer at Whepstead, was charged with a violent assault on a boy in his employment.
Defendant did not appear, the policeman who served the summons said Mr Andrews said he knew he did wrong but would not apologise, the boy appeared to suffer from a severe lashing from a wagon whip. 
The Bench ordered a warrant to be issued.

August 28th 1858

Inquest at Assington on William Fairweather, a boy aged 4 years, his father, a labourer for Mr Charles Parsons was in the meal house feeding the bean crusher which was worked by two horses, about ½ an hour before the accident the boy was sent home to his father's cottage, about ½ a mile distant.
Nothing more was seen of him until William Smith, the driver of the horses was attracted by screams and saw deceased entangled in a cog wheel, he stopped the horses but the poor little boy's legs were crushed to atoms, he died 6 hours later.
Accidental.

November 20th 1858

A market for the sale of fowls, eggs, butter, fruit and vegetables was opened at Sudbury Corn Exchange on Saturday last.

November 27th 1858

On Monday last, Reuben Chambers was examined at Clare on suspicion of setting fire to the farm premises of Frederick Brooke of Cowlinge on the 15th inst. 
Inspector Keeble compared the prisoner's boots with fresh footmarks in a field adjoining the stackyard and traced them to the prisoner's cottage, Mr Brooke said he had a dispute with the prisoner about haulm, the prisoner was apprehended at the Star Inn at Lidgate where he had said he expected a policeman about a fire. Committed.

November 27th 1858

David Hurrel, a lad from Stansfield was charged with stealing a chicken valued at 6d the property of Mr Hale of the Compasses Inn. Three days imprisonment and to be flogged.

December 4th 1858

On Tuesday evening of the 25th ult, as the goods train was leaving Bures station for Marks Tey, the engine burst with a terrible explosion, scattering portions a considerable distance, some weighing above one cwt were thrown through the air up to 100 yards away.
Both the driver and stoker were uninjured, the explosion shook Bures with doors being blown open.

December 11th 1858

The African slave trade seems to be in a bad way, we have accounts of one slaver captured by an American cruiser and sent into Charlestown, South Carolina and one with 600 slaves aboard was taken by a Spanish man of war and sent into Havannah and four more were captured by the English and sent into St Helena. 
It is plain that the activity in it's suppression the accursed traffic cannot last long.

December 18th 1858

Kedington On Friday last the 10th inst a sad accident happened to a young man named David Philips who was employed as assistant in the brewery of Mr John Price of this town.
It appears the unfortunate young man was in the act of crossing over some wort by means of a trough but missed his hold and was precipitated into the boiling liquor, medical assistance was obtained as quick as possible but he was so dreadfully scalded there is little hope of recovery.

1859 Bury Free Press newspaper archive

January 1st 1859

Cavendish. Henry Oakley and James Maxim were charged with trespassing in search of game on land called The Grove belonging to Joseph Stammers Garrett on the 12th of December last.
John Coggins, gamekeeper, said he saw defendants beating a hedgerow, they ran away when they saw him, they had a dog but not a gun with them, when he spoke to them one of them denied ever taking game in his life the other persisted in asking where the special mark was he had on him that he could swear by. 
One of the magistrates said there is no need for you to have a bump on your head to know him again. 
Fined 20s which they were unable to pay and they were committed to prison for three weeks.

January 22nd 1859

The Jennens Family Association has recently been formed by a large number of persons in and around Birmingham, they all claim to be descended from John Jennens, the grandfather of William Jennens, the estates are now held in trust by Earl Howe. 
The vast property has been in Chancery for upwards of 60 years and it is stated to exceed the enormous value of £12,000,000 to £14,000,000.
John Jennens was a Birmingham iron master and died in 1653.

February 19th 1859

On Friday last, as a wife of a labourer of Belchamp St Pauls, Essex was returning from Clare with a basket of goods and a bundle of straw. 
While walking on a footpath near the river, the night being dark, she accidentally went up to her knees into a part of the river known as the floodgates, considering the water at this spot is 6ft to 9ft deep the poor woman may be said to have had a narrow escape.

February 19th 1859

John Ince, labourer of Clare was charged with being drunk during Divine Service on the afternoon of Sunday last to the great annoyance of those in the same pew, he was not riotous but after the service was led out by four men. 
For trial.

February 19th 1859

We understand the Rev E. Bull of Pentlow is now erecting on his premises a column of 90 ft the object of which we are informed is to enable him by means of a telescope to watch the proceedings of the good people of Harwich and District, a distance in a straight line of somewhere about 30 miles. 
The column is an octagonal shape composed of brickwork and is being constructed by Mr Well of Sudbury.

February 26th 1859

In the course of Monday night, Thomas Jarvis, butcher of Calias Street, Clare, heard a favourite sheepdog which was tied up in his back yard, barking, then became quiet,
He took no notice but on going into yard next morning he found the dog lying on the ground with it's head almost severed from the body, the villain who perpetrated this act has not yet been discovered.

March 12th 1859

A horse belonging to the Rev E. Bull of Pentlow which had previously been unwell fell down in a field and died instantly.

March 19th 1859

Nearly 7 years ago, George Thompson, a bootmaker of Cavendish lodged a 4d piece in his throat and in spite of all efforts to eject it, it remained there until a few days back, during all this time he experienced great pain and difficulty in , often nearly suffocating by being unable to breathe.
For two or three months he was seriously ill and his recovery was despaired of, last Tuesday he was seized with a coughing fit and to his joyful surprise brought up the obstinate groat which was eaten away considerably and when ejected was covered with flesh.
This is strictly true.

April 2nd 1859

William Murkin, labourer of Hundon was charged by Henry Dennis of Clare with trespassing in search of game. 40s or 2 months.

April 2nd 1859

There was a fire at Hundon on the property of Edgar Marsh, considerable damage was done, a barn being destroyed with 30 coombs of wheat-stables-large shed-two straw stacks-two sheep and lambs and 10 pigs. 
Clare fire engine was soon in attendance and extinguished the flames.

April 2nd 1859

At Wickhambrook Petty Sessions, William Mason, horsekeeper to Mr Nathan Cook was charged with stealing three eggs and a quantity of oats. Three months for stealing eggs but not guilty of stealing oats.

April 2nd 1859

Death at Melford on the 29th ult aged 68 years, William Garrett formerly of Borley, Essex.

April 30th 1859

A serious affray took place on Good Friday morning at a small village two miles from Clare called Poslingford between two young men named Cutmore from Poslingford and Ince from Clare.
Ince was coming out of Ward's beerhouse when Cutmore struck him, he returned the blow there upon Cutmore stabbed him and ran off, Ince was carried into a house nearby and Mr H. Nazer, surgeon, arrived in time to stop the bleeding which was profuse, he was conveyed to Clare in a cart and now lies in a dangerous condition. 
Cutmore was committed to the next Assizes at Ipswich.

May 14th 1859

There was an extraordinary case of bigamy last week. 
A woman named Maria Woolsey aged 32 years belonging to Cavendish was admitted with her four children into Sudbury Union Workhouse, it appears her husband who is a tailor belongs to Waldingfield, she is his second wife, at the time when he married her she knew well his first wife was living.
After she had borne him four children he got acquainted with another woman who they ascertained was in possession of £50, the second wife passing herself off as his cousin and when courting his third spouse took care of the children and doing all to promote the match.
In due course they married, the second wife acting as bridesmaid, however the tailor soon deserted his third wife and with what was left of the money went back to his second wife who he has in turn left to take refuge in the Union House with her children in the workhouse. 
If this is the law for the preservation of the domestic relations of society they should be put in force.

June 4th 1859

Of the 7000 upwards of Irish emigrants have sailed from Liverpool for the United States this season (says the Irish Country Gentleman) the wreck of the Pomona has consigned nearly 400 to a watery grave. 
In April 1857, the Exmouth left Derby with 480 passengers, every soul was lost on the West coast of the Isle of Islay and two large mounds on a green slope now mark where all that could be landed of the dead
In 1852, 300 paupers were shipped in the Ben Nevis for Aspinal to work on the Panama railroad. The New York magazine of October 1856 gives a horrible description of their wretched fate and stated the 10,000 Irish workmen were sacrificed in making these lines, slaves were imported for the purpose performing work on these lines which the owners expect to turn to profit but the Irishmen are sent out of a land and it's their own which want bone and muscle to make it what it was designed to be.

June 4th 1859

Mark Lane Corn Prices. British wheat to 47s a quarter (36 stone)---Barley (32 stone) to 34s-Oats (24 stone) to 26s-Beans to 43s.

June 4th 1859

Mr Jackson of Brettenham, a young man of 21 years standing 6ft 2" high, last week wagered he could carry a coomb of wheat (18 stone) for one mile without stopping to rest, considerable odds were offered against him but he won with considerable ease.

June 4th 1859

A narrow escape from drowning occurred at Clare on Monday last, a child of four years was playing in the river Stour when he fell in and would have drowned if it had not been for Mr Ray who was passing, he jumped into the river and rescued the poor child.

June 4th 1859

At Ballingdon an extraordinary phenomena was witnessed in the shape of a fireball during a violent thunderstorm
A blacksmith named King Viall was standing with his brother at the door of his house shortly before 10 o' clock on Sunday evening when immediately after a clap of thunder there was an extremely vivid flash of lightning, they observed what appeared to be a fire ball fall from a cloud and descend within two yards in front of them which burst presenting the appearance of a magnificent firework.
The smoke had a smell of brimstone, Mr Viall's brother was unable to see for three minutes.

August 6th 1859

Charles Hills a labourer aged 11 years was charged with burglary and entering the house of Charles Mills of Lt Waldingfield and stealing a bottle of vinegar, a piece of bacon and £2 10s in silver. 6 weeks and to the reformatory for three years.

August 13th 1859

Inquest at the Black Lion at Glemsford on Alfred Jarman aged six months. Emily Jarman a single woman said she was the mother of the deceased, she had four children before, none had lived, on Sunday last she took him to Dr Waring's surgery, he died in the surgery before Dr Waring came in. Dr Waring said he carried out a post mortem, he had inflammation of the lungs.
Natural Death.

August 13th 1859

On Sunday the day school and the Sunday school at Shimpling had their annual treat at Chadacre Hall where they were provided with a bountiful meal by the Misses Halifax.
There were upwards of 200 children in number, they walked in procession to the Hall and sat down to an excellent dinner of roast beef and plum pudding etc, the Sudbury band was in attendance.

August 13th 1859

On Friday last a young man named John Arnold, a butcher was attacked by a bull on the Common at Clare
He defended himself with a long stick but eventually the bull ran him down, happily assistance was at hand and he escaped with light injuries. On Sunday evening a blind horse was grazing in a field, when it fell down a deep gravel pit and was so badly injured he was put down.

August 13th 1859

An urchin named Boreham of about 8 years was charged with injuring a hen at Horringer by throwing a stone at it. 
Damages of 2s with 9s costs and in default three days imprisonment and if brought up again to have a good whipping.

August 13th 1859

On Thursday afternoon, the 11th inst, a party of men in the employment of Mr J.E.Hale at Hawkedon Hall were at work in one of their master's fields when some little disagreement arose and as James Wilby was stooping at his work when another labourer named James Smith came up behind him and struck him a violent blow in the side, he has since been confined to bed. 
The serious results of these harvest quarrels ought long ere this to have taught the parties a little moderation and humanity.

September 24th 1859

At the last Letterbeen court (County Fermanagh, Ireland) the head constable M'Kinley charged the Rev Charles Jones with violating the law by digging potatoes on a Sunday in full view of the public. 
Dismissed.

October 29th 1859

The new Chapel at Stansfield was opened on the 21st inst at a cost of £898 11s which includes lights, palisade and fences, at the close of the service 300 persons retired to take tea in a barn.

November 19th 1859

Married. Byford -Sparrow on the 10th inst at Toppesfield, Essex, Joseph Byford of Bridge Farm, Long Melford to Sarah the only child of the late Thomas Sparrow of Aylsbury, Bucks.

December 3rd 1859

Married. Stammers- Ambrose, on the 24th inst at Christ Church, London, Thomas the only son of Joseph Hartley Stammers of Long Melford to Louisa Ann the only child of the late John Ambrose of Cavendish.

December 3rd 1859

Labourers strike at Haughly. At the Petty sessions on Monday week, William Warren, Charles Turner, Alexander Baxter, William Bloom jun, James Hunt and Edward Manning were charged with others with preventing James Wright and Joseph Pollard, two men employed by the Rev Edward Ward from continuing their work ploughing on the 10th inst
The men pleaded not guilty but the magistrates retired and thought it better if they apologised which they did, it was accepted with an admonition from the chairman. 
It was stated by James Pollard that he was paid 9s a week and lived rent free worth £4 a year in a cottage belonging to the Rev Ward.

December 31st 1859

The floods which prevailed extensively in the neighbourhood of Poslingford in the early part of the week have caused considerable damage to the new bridge now being in the course of erection in Poslingford, 
A large quantity of material was carried some distance down the river but has since been recovered, work is now progressing satifactorly.

1860 Bury Free Press newspaper archive

January 17th 1860

Henry Newman, malster of Edwardstone, was charged with stealing 3 pints of malting barley from his master at Edwardstone. P.c. Skippen said he saw defendant leave the malting when he induced him to stop and he took from his pockets 3 pints of barley. 3 months hard labour.

January 24th 1860

The deposit of 8 per cent upon estimated capital of Sudbury to Clare railway line has been made and no opposition was offered on standing orders, a great many shares have been taken up and there is no doubt the project will be carried out.

January 24th 1860

John Suttle and Arthur Clarke of Glemsford were charged with trespassing on land belonging to William Byford of Glemsford who said he was walking in one of his fields called Woodfield when he saw two men walking, one had a gun, he ran onto the other side of the hedge towards the men, they said to him "it's you is it", he said you have no business here, they had mistaken him for another person. 
£1 with 6s 3d costs each.

January 31st 1860

There was a fatal accident to a man named Jolly aged 47 in the employ of Mr George Rollinson of Rede.
 The inquest was held at Whepstead White Horse Inn. George Arnold in the employ of Mr John Cooke of the steam mills at Bury, said he had been to Hartest and was coming down the hill from Whepstead towards the wash at the bottom when he saw deceased with a tumbril load of stones with three horses coming down Harram Hill, deceased was hanging on the shafts trying to stop it but with the weight it kept gathering on them.
Deceased fell down and the horses kept running through the water and about 40 yards up the other hill. Witness said he caught the horses and tied them up and got deceased into his cart to take to Whepstead White Horse when he died. Enquiries were made at public houses on the road and there was no evidence of having drink of any kind. 
Accidental.

February 7th 1860

Charlotte Maxim of Cavendish was charged with stealing a pair of India rubber goloshes valued at 2s from Sophia Hammond of Cavendish. 
Sarah Hammond said "I live as a servant at Mr Pratt Vial's at Colts Hall, Cavendish, I lost a pair of goloshes, the prisoner was working there at the time". 
James Brown aged 16 said " I was working for Mr Vial, Sophia would lend me the goloshes sometimes and these are the ones produced". Mrs Viall said prisoner was helping at Christmas time for a week, she took Sophia to the prisoner's house in Cavendish where she produced them and admitted taking them. 
Admitted on bail until the next Sessions.

February 14th 1860

There was a fatal accident at Cockfield Mill to Thomas Bier who was killed by the falling down of the mill. 
The dangerous state of the mill had been noticed for sometime past, he leaves a widow and 6 children. The inquest was held at the King's Head, Cockfield on Thomas Bier aged 39 years who occupied the old post mill situated on the a little eminence leading from Bury to Lavenham. Accidental.

February 14th 1860

Letters to the Editor---

I think it might be of some interest to your readers that on Saturday the 18th inst, I shot at Livermere a fine specimen of White Tailed Eagle or Sea Eagle. The bird was in poor condition although it weighed 10 ½ lbs and measured 7ft 1in from wing tip to wing tip, it had been observed taking fish from the water. 

R.D.Gough.

March 6th 1850

A fund for the family of Jacob Bier, miller of Cockfield has been set up and subscriptions will be received by Messrs Oakes, bankers of Bury.

March 6th 1860

A fatal accident occurred to a bargeman named Martin, employed by Messrs Hibble and Co. of Sudbury.
He was guiding a large barge under Lodge Bridge when it struck one of the piles of the bridge and jarred it so much that steersman Martin was thrown off and sucked under the barge, it was more than an hour before his body was recovered.

March 13th 1860

Inquest at Chilton Sudbury on Abraham Martin aged 45 years. 
William Martin said the previous morning he was with his father in a barge of Mrs Allen's on the ditch side of the river, deceased was trying to keep it off the bridge but a good deal of wind caused it to swing and knock against post which jerked him overboard, they could not help quickly enough as the water was running very strong, it was more than an hour before the body was recovered. 
Accidental.

March 6th 1860

Minerva Grice aged 13 was charged with stealing a cake from the shop of Joseph Atkins of Melford on Saturday the 25th inst, the poor girl appeared to felt her position acutely and acknowledged her guilt . 
The Bench as a warning to her and others sent her to gaol for 14 days.

March 6th 1860

About 6-30 on Sunday morning a man named Simpson was walking on Low Road at Hitcham when he saw a hat on the road and 30 yards further on he saw a body lying on the brow of a ditch, quite dead, 
It proved to be R. Luckey, the elder son of Mr R.Luckey of Hitcham, recently deceased. It appears deceased was drinking in Hitcham White Horse nearly all Saturday and left about 11-40 on the night, he had nearly arrived at his lodgings at Mr Green's farm. 
Deceased who was respectfully connected, led a irregular life and it is feared he fell victim to his dissipated habits.

March 13th 1860

Deaths----On January 2nd at Hobart Town, Van Diemens Land, from injuries caused by the explosion of a rocket during practice, aged 18 years, George Hamilton Borton R.N. of Her Majesty's ship Pelorus, he is the fourth son of the Rev Borton, rector of Hartest, Sudbury.

March 13th 1860

Charlotte Maxim was acquitted on the charge of stealing goloshes at Cavendish.

Marech 13th 1860

Joshua Hemstead, ostler of Melford, aged 16 years, who was charged with rape at Melford was found guilty and sentenced to 9 months in prison.

April 3rd 1860

For sale by auction at the auction mart at Bury on April 11th, 4 superb working Devon oxen, 5 years old, first rate workers and direct from hard work.

April 3rd 1860

Married at Spitafields, London---Mr J.F.Orbell of Goldingham Hall, Bulmer, Essex, to Marianne Lucy the eldest daughter of Mr J.Catt of Manor House Witnesham.

April 2nd 1860

Died on the 2nd inst at Bulmer, Essex, with humble submission to Divine Will, John, oldest son of Charles Adams, late of Borley.

April 17th 1860

Frederick Angel and Alfred Brabrook, labourers of Cavendish, were summoned by their employer, Mr Pratt Vial, of Cavendish for drunkedness. 
Mr Viall said that about 7 in the morning he sent them to Sudbury with two tumbrels and two horses each, they returned at 4-30 in the afternoon, about 6 he heard a noise in the stable, he went in and saw Angel beating a horse with a whip, he asked him what he was doing and he said they had got at the corn hutch, defendant was drunk, Brabrook not so drunk, 
Mr Viall called one of his men who stated defendant was not so drunk but a bit worse for what they had. Angel 5s with 8s 6d costs, Brabrook withdrawn. 
Frederick Angel was further charged with unlawfully riding in a tumbril with three horses without reins at Pentlow. 2s 6d with 2s 6d costs.

April 24th 1860

Married on the 30th of January at Prahran, Australia, James Hassel,widower, late of Ballingdon, Essex, to Louisa Woods, widow of Prahran

May 1st 1860

Last Friday, in the noble old church in the ancient village of Long Melford in company of 900 gentry and poorer inhabitants of the district, we listened to an appeal from the minister of religion for aid to erect a beautiful and capacious school for the children of the poor of Meford. 
We trust that the school which is to be finished in October will prove beneficial to the village of Melford

March 8th 1860

Sudbury-Clare Railway Line. The bill was brought before a committee, a petition against it by the Rev Jenner and Mr John Barker, the former being a tenant for life of Clare Hill Farm and the latter a reversioner. 
Mr Burke, instructed by Messrs Crowder and Maynard Co., appeared for the promoters, several witnesses attended to support the line but no-one appeared for the petitioners. 
It is regretted they did not give notice of their intention to withdraw their opposition as it would have saved a lot of money. The line would accommodate a large agricultural district, there are no less than 12 water mills and steam mills and several large factories between Sudbury and Clare.

March 8th 1860

Died on the 1st inst in London, John Hale youngest of the late John Hale of Brook Hall, Essex.

March 15th 1860

Sarah Moss, widow of Melford, was charged with stealing 50 lbs of sprouts valued at 3s, the property of Gainsborough Dupont. Stephen Scott, farm bailiff to Mr Dupont, said, I went to a field in Melford called "the Queach" and saw the prisoner coming with sprouts under her arm. 1s with 7s 6d costs.

March 22nd 1860

Funeral at Stanstead, Suffolk, of Daniel Alston of Stanstead Hall, it was well attended by a large circle of friends and gentlemen. As the oldest tenant of the Kentwell Hall estate he acquired the regard and esteem of his former landlords, the late Hart Logan and the present owner Capt Starkie Bence at whose requirement the coffin was made from some of the finest timber grown on the estate. He attained the ripe old age of 73 years.

March 22nd 1860

Died at Cavendish Rectory-The Rev Thomas Castley at the age of 95 years, his father lived till near 100 years.

March 22nd 1860

Post Corn Windmill, known as Armsey or Bulmer Mill for sale.

July 3rd 1860

One evening last week, a boy in the employ of Richard Rolfe of Cheveley, was crossing the yard in which there was a horse and mare feeding from a crib, when the horse, a rather furious one, ran at him and commenced mangling him, the lad called out and the mare immediately ran at the horse with open mouth and seized him by the shoulder causing the horse to let go, the boy escaped with painful wounds.

July 31st 1860

For sale by auction at the Half Moon, Clare,---At Belchamp St Pauls-Lot 1, situated near Cold Fair Green, a messuage with barn-stable and other buildings, 51 acres, in occupation of Messrs Chaplin-Eagle-Chickall-Ray. Lot 2 -Saville field, 7 acres, abutting the road to Ovington-Lot 3-Pochey Hall, in the tenure of Mr Chickall-Lot 4, 5 acres called Eggland.

August 28th 1860

Married in London-Thomas Willesmere of Korcroit Grange, Williams Town, Australia to Marrianne Maria, eldest daughter of Thomas Worman of Belchamp Walter in Essex.

September 4th 1860

We regret to state reports of the increase in the unfavourbleness in the neighbourhood of the potato crop. 
On the lots of the freehold land at Risbygate, Bury, are almost an entire failure throughout, the south and midland counties report the same although in Ireland and Scotland they prove above.

September 4th 1860

On Tuesday at about 1 o' clock, two labourers named Joseph Goold and James Bird in the employ of Mr Chenery of Thorpe Morieux in Suffolk went to the Bull Inn while hindered from harvesting by rain.
After drinking a quart of mild beer they called for two quarts of strong beer, between 7 and 8 they were joined by another two men named Sewell and Pryke and three pints of middle brew were drunk, at 9 o' clock Goold was so incapable he fell down in the kitchen and they carried him to the stable and laid him down in the straw, his neck cloth and collar were loosened.
About ½ an hour later the landlord went to bed leaving him snoring, thinking he would get up and go home.On going to the stable at between 5-6 in the morning he found Goold dead and stiff. Mr Growse, surgeon, said his mouth and throat were full of vomit and that he died through suffocation, there were small marks on his skin caused by him falling over, Pryke had also struck him several times in fun but not savagely. Died through suffocation. A similar case is reported from Peterborough last week, an Irish harvestman went to sleep in a stable, two of his countrymen left him there, when in the morning he was found dead, the surgeon said he suffocated.

September 4th 1860

A religious service was held by the body of Friends on Sunday evening in a barn belonging to Mr Ruffel near Melford turnpike gate, it was attended by a large congregation .

September 4th 1860

Charles Savage, a farmer of Hundon was charged with stealing a sovereign from Spencer Ruse, a miller of the parish. 
The parties were at the Lion in Hundon and Ruse himself admitted being in drink, he took out his money amounting to £5 10s in gold and some silver and laid it on the table, a half sovereign was dropped on the floor and a candle was taken from the table to look for it and the prisoner on the evidence of William Clarke, a dealer, put his hand in the money. 
The magistrates dismissed the case and cautioned the prisoner to be more careful in future.

September 4th 1860

A gentleman of Suffolk was travelling in Wisconsin, the state of which Chicago is the shipping port. He writes to a friend that on the morning he had travelled a distance of 18 miles through a unbroken field of wheat, he was accompanied by a friend to the only hill in the neighbourhood from which the eye ranged across a vast plain, the whole of which was covered with wheat, the countryman asked him to count the reaping machines and he counted 97.

September 4th 1860

At Woolpit fair on Monday there was a large show of horses and ponies but trade was dull except for Irish ponies which were in great demand.

September 4th 1860

Last week a valuable horse belonging to Mr S. Pearson of Clare was feeding on Old Barley meadow, (perhaps should read Old Bailey) when it got it's feet firmly fixed in a drain, it was found in a state of exhaustion and died before it could be drawn out by pullies.

September 25th 1860

Married on Monday 25th of July at Castlemaine, Australia, J. Acquetill, draper of Campbell's Creek, previously of Seven Oaks, Kent, to Mary Hannah, eldest daughter of Mr T. Pattle of Bury.

September 25th 1860

On Saturday last the post windmill situated a short distance from Bildeston and belonging to Mr King was destroyed by fire.
It was 60 years to the day when it was first used on which occassion Bildeston celebrated the event by the ringing of a peal of hand bells in the mill.

September 25th 1860

For sale -Live and dead stock at Cardinals Farm, Foxearth and of Lyston Hall Farm, near Sudbury. J Carter and Jones are favoured with instructions from the executors of the late Mr T.S. Ewer to sell by auction on the premises at 12 o' clock, the live and dead stock.-10 horses-10 promising 2-3 year old colts and fillies-6 foals-20 Shorthorn heifers-10 Suffolk cows-quantity of swine-assortment of farm implements-pony chaise-harness-gig by Deeks and Hayward of Clare-dog cart by Hunneybun.

October 2nd 1860

On Tuesday last the foundation stone for the new tower was laid at Glemsford in the presence of a large body of Clergy and Gentlemen of the neighbourhood.

October 2nd 1860

For sale at Wait's Farm, Belchamp Walter, Essex , Blunden and Squire will sell by auction on the premises on October 10th by direction of William Wright who has let the estate, the live and dead stock. 6 horses-2 promising 3 years old colts by Mr Badham's horse- chestnut colt- 6 Welsh heifers in calf-35 ewes-113 half bred lambs-24 shoats-implemements-horse powered chaff cutter-3 hp steam chaff engine. The above are suited to cultivations of 200 cars.

October 9th 1860

On May 26th-Accidently drowned while crossing a flooded river in the province of Otago, New Zealand, George Calvert the second son of the Rev Blathawayt of Leiston in Suffolk.

October 9th 1860

To be sold at the Auction Mart on Tuesday---Brettenham Park Estate is offered for sale comprising a noble mansion-part of the village of Brettenham with Risings and Wetherden Hall and 11 fertile farms, the whole occupying 1740 acres. It was knocked down exclusive of timber at £ 64.000.

October 9th 1860

John Wallage of Denston in Suffolk was charged with violating his own daughter, Betsy Wallage aged 17 years. Mary Wallage, wife, gave evidence, the crime was committed in a daring manner in spite of remonstrations from both.

October 16th 1860

The wretch who is charged with the horrible crime (we could almost say it is unhappily no longer capital) a case of greater depravity has never come before our criminal tribunals.

October 16th 1860

Foxearth annual harvest home was held last Tuesday and was attended by a large number of labourers of the parish and the friends and gentry of the district. 
In the morning there was the show of cottagers vegetables in the schoolroom and at 1-30 a procession of children and the clergy with the choir, preceeded by Sudbury Volunteer band, paraded through the village to the church where the evening service was intoned by the Curate with chanting and an anthem, the harvest hymn and the old 100th Psalm was sung.
The sermon was preached by the Rev Borton of Wickham St Pauls. 
Dinner was served in a large tent on the Rectory lawn and was partaken by nearly 500 persons, 400 lbs of meat alone was cooked in addition to plum pudding and pies. 
The Rector and his visitors occupied one table and the labourers the other, there was dancing on the lawn and the popular sport of Aunt Sally followed by dancing in the schoolroom in which the visitors freely mixed with the cottagers until 11 when supper was provided. The exertions of the Rev Foster and his lady and the Rev Irvine, Curate, for the comfort of all was unceasing, the arrangements made were on a liberal scale.

October 23rd 1860

The opening of the National School at Melford takes place on October the 30th.

October 30th 1860

Robert Bruce of Lawshall was summoned by Mrs Elizabeth Field, landlady of the Harrow Inn for assaulting her, 
Defendant admitted the charge, complainant said he brought to her house an empty beer bottle and demanded a drink for doing so, she gave him a glass of drink and he wanted more, she refused and he shook his fist in her face using abusive language. 
The Bench said that the young men of that parish seemed bent on such misconduct but they were determined to stop it and would inflict a fine of £1 on him and 6s 6d costs.

November 20th 1860

The Colne Valley and Halstead Railway propose to carry on an extension of it's line from Clare and Haverhill through the northern part of Essex to Cambridge where it would join the proposed Bedford- Cambridge line.

December 4th 1860

On Friday, two Irish dealers named John Caffray and Andy Holmes were charged with being drunk and disorderly at Bury. 
On Thursday the defendants were at Mr Madders beerhouse and began to be disorderly, Mr Madder tried to turn them out when Holmes drew a knife and threatened to use it, the police were sent for and the defendants taken into custody, on searching them at the police station they found Holmes had £90 on him and Caffray has £40. 
Discharged with the payment of expenses.

December 4th 1860

Breach of Promise Case was held in the Secondaries Court at Chelmsford in Essex. 
On Wednesday a writ of inquiry was held to assess damages in an action for breach of promise of marriage recently brought against the Rev Philip Brett, M.A. rector of Mount Bures in Essex by a young lady named Cookshott now filling a situation as governess in Manchester,.
The defendant having suffered judgement by default, the damages were laid at £5000, but to the great disappointment of persons assembled to hear the case a verdict of £1200 was agreed to.

December 11th 1860

Married at Harbledown near Canterbury-The Rev Robert Godolphin Peter, rector of Cavendish, Suffolk, late fellow and tutor of Jesus College, Cambridge to Catharine Stewart, daughter of the Rev Lyall, rector of Harbeldown.

December 11th 1860

At Sudbury Town Council Meeting, the Mayor, Mr S. Higgs stated that the Wood Hall shackage question was settled, he had written to Messrs Gepp and Vely, solicitors for the owners saying he had no objections to the withdrawal of the requisition on the understanding that the valuation of the agreement was not disturbed.
The solicitors replied that they were ready to adhere to the valuation and the Corporation should have Fulling Pit meadow and the whole of North Meadow and a £1000 in money, the withdrawal of acceptance and second requisition including the whole of North Meadow was the best mode, this was accordingly done by the Council.

December 11th 1860

Sudbury Market. Not so large attendance today, what wheat was at hand was of poor order so little business was done, the barley trade was also not so good. Talavera wheat to 60s- white wheat to 60s-red wheat to 50s- rivets to 40s-grinding barley to 32s-malting to 42s.

1861 Bury Free Press newspaper archive

January 26th 1861

As Mr Stammers of Cavendish was returning from Clare on Monday evening last, in consequence of the slippery ground he fell fracturing his leg.

February 23rd 1861

Clare. There was a serious charge against a farmer on Monday; Jeremiah Burch of Hargrave was charged with stealing a large quantity of wine from the cellar of Thomas Nice of Gt Bradley. 
The prisoner is the owner-occupier of a considerable amount of land in Hargrave and is an overseer of the parish. The prosecutor said that on Monday the 4th of February I discovered I had lost a quantity of wine from my cellar, I always keep the keys to the cellar myself, there is a window on the outside, I found I had lost wine from several bins, several dozen in all, the lock is a common one, easily picked. 
Committed for trial.

February 23rd 1861

Married-On the 18th inst at Friars Street Chapel in Sudbury by the Rev Steer, Orlando the only son of Robert Payne, farmer and miller of Brettenham to Mary Ann the eldest daughter of Thomas Brand of Gt Cornard.

March 23rd 1861

John Wallage aged 35 years, labourer of Denston was charged with ravishing his daughter on the 1st of October last year. 12 months hard labour. William King, labourer of Ipswich for rape upon his daughter aged 13 years at Ipswich. 
8 months hard labour.

March 23rd 1861

Bury Corn Market-Wheat to 54s lid-Barley to 37s lid-Oats to 25s 6d-Beans to 37s.

March 23rd 1861

Jeremiah Birch, farmer, was charged with stealing 15 dozen bottles of port and sherry, the property of Thomas Nice of Gt Bradley. 12 months hard labour.

April 6th 1861

Hartest. There was a wedding of considerable amusement at Hartest on Tuesday last, the parties, James Garrad, aged over 60 years and Eliza Felton of about 40 years, the lady has been an inmate of the workhouse for the last 19 years and in the course of the winter Garrad through lack of employment took shelter under the same roof.
He was smitten by the lady and made an offer of marriage which was accepted, the twain left the "House" to be made one flesh, the Curate gave the funds for the banns to be published and the Rector consented to forego his fees
They were accompanied to church by friends, the gentleman who officiated in the parental capacity generally known as "daddy", was adorned with sundry feathers after the fashion of a Red Indian or a New Zealand chief. When the party came out of church they went in different directions and retired to several houses but not long after the bridesmaid thought she ought to have "stood a treat" and accordingly gave the bridegroom 3d with the requirement that he proceed to a public house and purchase one pint of beer to regale himself
He went but while there he was overcome by temptation to partake of refreshments with different friends until he was overcome by drink, he essayed to go home with his beer but was found by the roadside in a state of intoxication
The bride's patience having been exhausted went to search for her lord and reached the public house where she was also assailed by temptation and eventually rendered to the same condition, such was the temptation of the first day of the foolish couple, thanks to the beer the drunken bridegroom escaped at least for one night without a (curtain lecture), the bride by her weakness sacrificed the right of reproof.

May 11th 1861

Shocking death at Hawstead. On Thursday night we understand that Mr Bigsby, farmer, was returning home on horseback after spending the evening with a friend when by some cause he fell into a miry place by the roadside, his hands and face being buried in the mud and being unable to extricate himself it is presumed he suffocated and was found on Friday morning in this position. 

May 25th 1861

On Friday night last, Clare town was thrown into a state of excitement by a telegraph message being received with notice that the preamble of the Bill for the line from Sudbury-Clare-Cambridge, after a severe contest had been proved.
 The band paraded the streets and a huge bonfire of old tar barrels and sugar hogsheads was ignited and burnt in profusion.

June 1st 1861

While public interest is directed towards transportation as a Parliamentary Bill is now pending but the insubordinations which now reign among out convicts at home, it is pleasant to read the testimony borne by a respectable magistrate of the district of Toodyay, Western Australia to the satisfactory working of the system pursued by that colony carrying hope to those who have the ultimate reformations of convicts at heart. 

Our convicts in Western Australia (writes Captain Harris in a letter to the Perth Gazette on February 2nd) states the happy results of the facts with the men. The two principal stores in the district are now conducted by these men, now free and they are universally respected. 
Two of the best conducted public houses in the district are held by them, contracts for bridges, road work, brick making, sawing, carpentry work, building contracts, engineers for the mills and shoemakers are wholly in the hands of ticket of leave men or expiree men. 
A considerable number of them possess their own bullocks and horse teams and small farms, the amount of property in possession of these men in capital and land, sheep, horses, cattle and sandalwood in this district alone must be up to £20,000 and land rented by the Government, more than 45,000 acres.
This is a colony where money is alone by downright hard work, good management and owing to the small population dishonesty in business is easily detected for every man's affairs are known. Crime in the Toodyay district during the past ten years, I shall not go into details, but in my assertions will not alone introduce the bonded but also the free emigrants, up to 1850 not one case of murder, manslaughter, rape, arson, burglary, highway robbery or unnatural offences of any description to the value of £200 has occurred and scarcely not one door is locked or one barn or granary has been pilfered and yet 2,500 ticket of leave men have obtained tickets or passes for short or long periods. 
The first ticket of leave man, Charles Burgess and upwards of 300 of his companions found their first home in Toodyay and the average number of ticket of leave men are dispersed among the Toodyay settlers.
For the past two years there has been an average of 300 together with expirees and C P's having made a total of 500, such has been the working of the moral force system of this colony, there is no room for extensive robberies or fraud scattered through the district of 700 miles with a free population this has afforded no excitement to vices, with a splendid climate, encouragement and success they have in good earnest sought to benefit themselves and become respectable members of society.

June 8th 1861

Marriage at Glemsford. William Mills of Hill Farm, Polstead, the eldest son of Daniel Mills of Rodbridge Farm to Bessie the eldest daughter of Richard Beaumont of Broom Farm, Glemsford.

June 15th 1861

Valuable freehold estate at Cockfield for sale-Earl's Hall estate-farmhouse-offices-331 acres 1 rod 37 perches- excellent agricultural land and pasture. 
Apply to Messrs Jackson and Sparke of Bury.

June 15th 1861

William Barnes aged 79 years was charged with stealing a loaf of sugar valued at 16s from Mr Wickham, grocer of Melford. For trial.

June 15th 1861

Henry Stanhope of Melford was charged with assaulting James Mothersole, gamekeeper on the Melford Hall Estate. 
It appears that defendant and George Cadge went with Charles Sargent to an osier bed on the Melford Hall estate and were walking through the osier beds, Cadge was showing Sargent what he wanted him to do (clean weeds etc away from the roots), the complainant had been watching from 500 yards and jumping from a hedge and said to Sargent "I don't know 'foot' you have been busy stooping in the osier beds" 
Complainant wanted to search Sargent but he would not let him, complainant called out to another keeper named Theophilus Field, the other keeper came up and complainant laid hold of Sargent, Stanhope then struck him in the face.
Cadge persuaded Sargent to let them search him, they found nothing. 
The bench said Mothersole had exceeded his duty and the case was dismissed.

June 29th 1861

Ann Scott, aged 15 years was charged with stealing lb of loaf sugar and 12 eggs the property of her master Mr E. Green of Acton Hall. Fined Is.

June 29th 1861

William Pledger of Cavendish was fined 5s and 1 Is costs for throwing a mugful of water over the face of p.c. Bailey at Cavendish.
 5s with 7s 6d costs.

June 29th 1861

George Ambrose, Henry Winter, Henry Duce and George Alger were summoned for breaking the peace at Melford. It appears Winter and Ambrose were fighting about 11 at night near the Crown Inn at Melford, Duce was stripped off and urging Winter on, Algar was picking one of the combatants. Algar dismissed the others to keep the peace with sureties of £10.

July 6th 1861

Cricket. Monks Eleigh v Melford.. Monks Eleigh won without the fall of a wicket Melford- Alston 0 and 18-Richold-2-5-Brown-2-0-Cator-3-2-J. Stead-2-6-Blandon -0-7-Vining- 0-11-Rev Bull not out 11-Coe-0-2-Hunt 6-1 Monks Eleigh-----Wallace-12-T. Collins-23-14-W. Scott-not out 15-not out 3-Rev Swallow-7-T. Platten-5-White- 7-Gage-0-Ranson-3-Garnham-6-Captain Russel-0-Total 95-191?

July 13th 1861

Charles Murkin labourer, aged 35 years, was charged with stealing a bushel of barley from Mr T. Dennis. 
4 months hard labour.

August 3rd 1861

. Alfred Lord, labourer was charged with placing a piece of wood called a "sleeper" across a railway line in Wetherden on the 10th of July with intent to obstruct and injure passengers. 
Penal servitude for 4 years.

August 3rd 1861

. On Monday last at Wickhambrook, a little boy named Bocock got up on a donkey which was feeding by the side of the road, another boy who was keeping the donkey desired him to get off but he refused, on pulling him off his arm was broken.

August 16th 1861

Farmers in the neighbourhood of Fordham have been occupied in cutting corn which has made much improvement of late and promises a good crop, the potato disease is most extensive in the neighbourhood and the early ones taken up for seed are completely decayed.

August 24th 1861

A case of drowning was occasioned in the river Stour at Listen Mill near Melford on Saturday last, a young man named Henry Jeffries was out for a walk in the afternoon and nothing was heard of him until Friday at about 7 when he was found lying dead beside the river quite dead, his head was lying in the rushes at the edge of the stream, the water covering his face.
He was subject to fits and it is supposed he was taken with one, deceased is the son of the butler to Mr Jeffries was a fine lad of 17 years and was in the employ of Mr Stanhope the shoemaker of Melford and was much liked. 
Found Drowned.

August 31st 1861

Fire broke out in the stackyard of Mrs Cracknell of Oak Farm,Norton, a wheat stack and clover stack were consumed, the engine from Woolpit soon arrived and by the exertions of neighbours and others other stacks were preserved.

September 7th 1861

Inquest at the Lion Inn, Stoke by Clare on Mark Meers aged 60.
Henry Johnson, foreman on the works of the Colne Valley railway line in course of formation between Ridgewell and Haverhill, said deceased picked up a lump of earth with another man when the earth parted in the middle, knocking deceased down and rolling upon his head, it is perceived he received internal injuries as he never opened his eyes again and died in less than half an hour, he was conveyed home in a cart. It is stated that in consequence of the dry weather the blue clay lumps are now rock hard and very apt to split. Accidental.

September 7th 1861

William Hasell, a horse hair curler of Melford was charged with trespassing in search of game on the Melford Hall estate. £1 and 10s cost.

September 21st 1861

Who would ever have dreamed a year and a half since that a 1000 men in the streets of New York would reverently be heard singing in praise of John Brown, such scene was witnessed on Saturday evening last, says a New York paper. 
One of the new regiments from Massachusetts on the way through the city of the seat of the war sang-John Brown's body lies mouldering in it's grave etc etc, seldom had New York witnessed such a sight or heard such a strain, no military hero of the present war has been thus honoured, no statesman has loosed the tongues of a thousand men to chant his patriotism.
Little did Captain Brown think of the national struggles that were to follow his eventful death and that his calmness and firmness gave evidence of his faith and that the cause of freedom demanded that he sacrifice his life and he nobly did. 
It is noticeable while the regiment united in one voice, thousands of private citizens, young and old, on the side walks, doorways and windows joined in, few who witnessed the triumphal tread of the noble band arrayed for the war the song of freedom will forget the thrilling tones of the song.

September 12th 1861

Henry Frost and William Frost, two boys, were charged with stealing apples from Mr Silverstone of Saxham, their employer, 5s including costs. 
Mr Silverstone advanced the money and promised to employ them again if they behaved better.

October 19th 1861

On Wednesday evening, Clare was thrown into considerable excitement by news of a person being killed on the Ashen road just passed the iron bridges on the Ashen road
It appears a respectable female named Mallion aged about 28 years and housekeeper to Mr Byford of Yeldham was driving a horse and gig on her way home, not being used to driving, the horse became unmanageable and running down the street on rounding the corner of Nethergate street it continued on it's course till it reached the Ashen road when it ran into a donkey and cart and capsized, the deceased fell on her head and died immediately. 
The remains of the deceased were removed to the Priory church. No blame attached to the driver of the donkey cart.

October 19th 1861

On Wednesday evening last, a fire broke out on the premises of Mr W. Price of Taylors farm, Kedington, a barn containing 22 acres of unthreshed barley, granaries and a cowhouse and 2 cows were also burnt. The fire is supposed to be the work of an incendiary.

October 19th 1851

William Downey of Melford was charged with stealing a !4 of a peck of potatoes valued at 3d the property of Mrs Woolard of Melford. 
Lorking Woolard her son said while going down Cock and Bell lane to the river to water his pony he saw prisoner and another man coming across Town field which leads to a field occupied by Mrs Woolard in which is a barn containing potatoes, the prisoner threw a bag which he threw away in a ditch, he went to the place where the bag was thrown and found it full of potatoes. 14 days hard labour.

October 19th 1861

At a recent great exhibition by Schweria Mecklenburgh, the following prizes were awarded to English manufacturers. Ploughs-two silver medals to Ransome and Sims-one silver medal to Hornsby and Sons-
Scotch Grubber, Ransome and Sims, bronze medal-
Drills, Garret and Sons-silver medal-
reaping machines, Burgess and Key, gold medal, silver medal Wood,--
horse hoe, Garret and Sons highly recommended-
root cutter-Ransome and Sims, silver medal for Biddell's patent-
Universal Mill, Ransome and Sims, silver medal-
Horse gear, Ransome and Sims, Bronze medal-
threshing machine, Ransome and Sims, gold medal-
single dresser, Ransome and Sims-Hornsby and Sons commended-
chaff cutter, Ransome and Sims, Bronze medal.

October 26th 1861

.Mr Evans, gardener and nurseryman of Coggeshall in Essex, was on his way to Bury market on Tuesday evening last, as he was driving along the highroad between Melford and Bury between 6 and 7 in the evening he was passing under some trees near Shimpling Park when a man asked him to give him a ride, he did so and had not ridden a ¼ of a mile when the stranger struck him and pushed him then jumped out and ran away, almost immediately Mr Evans discovered his left hand trouser pocket was torn and a purse containing £36 in gold was gone, he returned to Melford and gave information to Inspector Schofield.

October 26th 1861

Inquest at the Half Moon, Clare, on Miss Mallion proved that she was driving at a furious pace and no blame attached to anyone whom she came in contact with.

November 2nd 1861

Henry Bailey, a machine man of Chevington was charged with assaulting his wife on November 17th inst
Complainant said that on the night in question she went to the Pear Tree public house, he said he would not come home with her to which she said she would go where he went, he had not been home the previous night and had been drinking all the day but was not drunk, he pushed her across the road two or three times and he struck her in the stomach as he had done on previous occasions, she had put up with it till now hoping he would get better but he got worse, he denied he had struck her. 
Bound over to keep the peace for £10, he said he had not got any money but his wife kindly paid to keep him out of prison.

November 2nd 1861

Sudbury Rifle shoot for silver cup by members of the 11th Suffolk Volunteer Corps was won by Sgt Rogers-2nd prize of £3 was won by Private Lenny after a shoot off a tie with Cundy and Wheeler. Consolation prize of £1 was won by Private W.L.Lewis-2nd won by Private Mumford of 12s-3rd by Private King after a shoot of with Private Brand.

November 30th 1861

New Zealand Passenger Line of Packets. Notice to emigrants. Free grants of land of 40 acres and upwards can be obtained by passengers in these ships of this line. 
Apply to J.E.Simpson of Stowmarket.

November 2nd 1861

Three boys were charged with stealing bread and meat from Thomas Coe, labourer of Melford. 
Maurice Whittle aged 16 years was charged and two other boys admitted being confederates. Thomas Coe said he was ploughing near the turnpike road at Melford, he missed his bread and meat from his "nose bag" which he had laid on a bank adjoining the road, the prisoner and two others boys named Downey were close at hand but denied taking it, the Downey brothers were questioned by the Bench and they admitted. 
All three boys were admonished by the Bench and dismissed.

December 28th 1861

Death of the Prince Consort is reported.

December 28th 1861

Joseph Bullock of Melford was charged with stealing some straw valued at 4d, property of Mrs Woolard. 3 weeks hard labour.