The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1856 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive

The news in Britain

January 2nd 1856.

Frederick Smith of Bury, of the marine artillery, who was promoted to the rank of bombardier for his gallantry in shooting a Russian rifleman by whom our gunners had been made annoyed, has been on furlough visiting relations and friends in Bury has been promoted corporal for meritorious service, he also has two good conduct stripes.

January 2nd 1856.

Letter from an Emigrant received

by Mr James Porter of Barnham, late of Ixworth in Suffolk.
Sir,
I inform you I have arrived safely at Sydney after 106 days thanks to the merciful providence who preserved me over the mighty deep for at times the sea ran mountainous high which caused much sea-sickness.
I was glad when we saw land. Directly a number of gentlemen came on board and I let myself to a man named Johnstone who keeps a large quantity of cows and sends milk to Sydney twice a day.
I was in too much hurry to let myself, I only get 30 a year and board and lodgings,
I get my rations-10lbs of meat-10lbs of flour-2 lb of sugar-1/2lb tea. Next year I am to get 40 a year, I wish some of you Barnhams were here for I am roasting a leg of mutton for supper, this is a fine country, plenty of work and the people are well paid,
Give my love to William Baker if he is alive and to Thomas Belsham of New Zealand and tell him I don't sit down to pig's heads but to ribs of beef and legs of mutton.
This is winter here but I am working in my shirt sleeves, no sending back if you are a few minutes late for here Jack is as good as his master. Hope the rest of you will follow me, God bless,

James Porter.

January 2nd 1856.

Sudbury Market. Wheat to 79s 5d per quarter (36 stones) barley to 38s 8d per quarter.( 32 stones).

January 9th 1856.

For stealing 4 oxen from Mr Raynham of Chelsworth, Joseph Bumpstead was sentenced to 15 years transportation.

January 9th 1856.

Alfred Ruse was charged with stealing a purse containing 7 sovereigns, 3 half sovereigns and a 5 note at Hundon, the property of William Malyon. The prosecutor is a small farmer at Hundon, he was drinking at Hundon Plough, he pulled out his purse to pay his reckoning, after doing so he went out and on his return missed his purse, a man named Cuthbert said he saw him drop his purse and Ruse picked it up, a constable was sent for and the premises were searched but nothing was found, Ruse returned the purse next morning but with 1 17s 6d short. 6 weeks hard labour.

January 16th 1856.

Inquest at Gt Waldingfield on Charles Elvin aged 52 who while riding on the shafts of a wagon drawn by four horses when they took fright and in trying to stop them galloping he fell down with the wheels passing over his head. Accidental.

January 16th 1856.

On Monday night between 10-11am, a man was going up to the house of Mrs Flower of Feltwell Place when he saw some men in the yard, he immediately informed Jonathan Flower, a powerful young man who armed himself with a hunting stick and with the informant proceeded into the yard, when opening the door of the barn, three men made their escape in different directions, two got away but the other got over one gate and tried to get over a second when Mr Flower aimed a blow which felled him, the hook catching him on the side of the head
He proved to be "Tom Gathercole" who for many years has defied the blue coated men although suspected of being concerned in many robberies. He was removed to the Oak Inn at Feltwell where his wounds were dressed by Mr Archer the surgeon who stated he cannot be removed for 7-10 days, he being quite delirious at times, another man has been taken and remanded.
They left behind them 8 sacks-2 dead fowls- a dark lantern and a large quantity of barley lying about which was their object. Many congratulations have been received by Mr Flower for having at last secured one who for many years was a great dread to farmers for it is said his mother was a "witch" and at her decease willed her son a little talisman which would at any time save him from the hands of justice.

January 23rd 1856.

There was an awful occurrence at the church in Melford on Sunday afternoon during the service, William Green, one of the Brethren of Melford Hospital fell down and expired before he could be got out of the church, he was 69 years old.

February 6th 1856

In the small village of Stanstead three people have died within nine days. They were Widow Ives 82-Widow Game 77-Widow Rutter 91.

February 20th 1856.

Died at Cowlinge aged 83, Henry Turner, for 52 years clerk to the parish, this man at 20 years could not read or write, when he was team man to Mr George Webb he was instructed by that gentleman's family and by strenuous exertions achieved the desired results.

February 20th 1856.

Last week as the housekeeper to Mr T. Bridgeman of Risbygate Street in Bury was pumping water when the crown of the well fell in leaving her suspended over the well which is 70 feet deep, she was clinging to the handle, her screams attracted the attentions of some workmen employed at Mr Footer's on the adjoining premises and they rescued her.

February 27th 1856.

Six persons living lately at Bulmer in Essex, left on Tuesday morning for New Zealand to join their friends who emigrated in 1853 and who have sent very encouraging letters from their adopted land.

March 5th 1856.

Inquest at Hepworth on Henry Smith, aged 36, who was leading the drill horses when the middle one kicked him violently in the stomach and he died the following morning.

March 5th 1856

On Friday 22nd an accident nearly attended by death occurred at Belchamp Hall, Belcham Walter, the seat of Mr S.M.Raymond. It appears that after the family had retired to bed two of the maids filled a large iron pail with heated coke and placed it in their bedroom, at about 7 in the morning Mr Oliver Raymond of the Stock Exchange who was staying at the Hall for a few days was suddenly awakened by his father who said he feared something dreadful had happened upstairs as he had heard dreadful shrieks from the room where the two servants slept. In a few short moments a dreadful spectacle presented itself, there lay the victims of their own thoughtlessness their faces purply blue with their eyes set their hands clenched and limbs rigid and to all appeared dead.
The mother of one of the girls had been to call them had found herself standing over the inanimate form of her child, she uttered a scream.
Doctor Lynch of Sudbury was sent for but an hour had elapsed before his arrival in the meantime Mr O.Raymond contrived to open their mouths with a spoon and managed to get some cold water into them and at last by the dint of friction and hot water on the feet he was successful in bringing the vital spark back which was well nigh gone for ever. There is every probability for their recovery. It is extraordinary that after several similar cases have occurred from igniting burning coke or charcoal in the bedroom at night with the windows closed and often the chimney stopped up that we have to report a fresh instance.

March 12th 1856.

Rumours are circulating in Ingham in consequence of a young man named George Drurey employed by Mr Nunn of Ingham, he was missing since Saturday night when he left the Griffin public house at 11 with companions but turned a different way towards his home, ponds were dragged without effect. On Sunday evening last, his body was found in a pit which was 12ft deep beside the footpath leading from Ingham across the meadow to Timworth. Witnesses who left the public house with him said they went towards Stow and he towards the school where the path turns towards Timworth and (of course) they said he did not appear "freshy" but p.c. Halls said the night before he picked him up drunk in the meadow next the pit. Mr Image, surgeon, said there were no marks of violence but died due to drowning, he was 25 years old.

March 19th 1856.

We understand a number of poplar trees are being felled in the neighbourhood of Friars Lane in Bury for charcoal previously to their conversion into gun powder for the Government.

March 19th 1856

On Saturday a man named Joseph Rutter of Boxted was driving a wagon along Melford road a short distance from Sudbury when he endeavoured to stop the horses and fell down with two wheels passing over him causing instant death. He leaves a widow and three small children to mourn his loss.

March 19th 1856.

Inquest at Suffolk Hospital on Elizabeth the daughter of Charles Palmer, labourer, of Horringer who being five years old was left in charge of two others, one an idiot and a three year old while the mother went out washing and she was pushed into the fire by the youngest and dreadfully burned, she died next morning.

March 19th 1856.

Inquest at Lawshall on James Hammond, farmer, having been depressed for some time in respect of his brother's will, he cut his own throat with a razor, Mrs Hammond obtained help from Joseph Bowers, a neighbour but the poor man whose intellect seems to have gone died on Monday morning.

March 19th 1856.

On Saturday morning, a man named Rutter of Boxted near Hartest, was driving a wagon on the Melford road when endeavouring to stop the horses fell and the wheels went over him causing instant death.
It is stated that he left a widow and three small children.

March 19th 1856.

We regret to announce the death of Sir William Hyde Parker of Melford Hall in Suffolk which took place on the 21st inst at Government House, Devonport at which port he arrived two days previous in her majesty's ship St George from Lisbon where he had been all winter in very ill health. Deceased was 71 years of age represented West Suffolk in the 1st reformed parliament in 1833-35 but retired at the election in the latter year.
We are not aware who succeeds to the estates both the next heirs having lost their lives in the naval service, one in the unfortunate affair at Petropaulovski and the other in the expedition up the mouth of the Danube.

March 19th 1856.

John Parminter, for assault at Melford. 14 days.

March 19th 1856.

John Woods for stealing wood at Cavendish. 3 months.
Number in gaol at Bury-74.

March 19th 1856.

William Griggs for stealing 1 bushel of barley at Gt Cornard, the property of Messrs Taylor. 4 months.

March 26th 1856.

Letters to the Editor-----

John Johnson, a private in the 95th regiment who received a gunshot wound at Inkerman has died in hospital in Scutari, his mother, a poor widow living at Preston near Bury was in receipt of 2s 6d a week from the Guardians of the Poor of the Cosford Union, about a fortnight since she received the arrears of pay amounting to 1 12s 10d due to her deceased son, upon learning this, the Guardians stopped the weekly payment alleging she would not require assistance while she had the money referred to. Sir it is thus the wealthy of England should testify their sense of the valour of her lowlier sons.
P. H. of Lavenham.

April 2nd 1856.

By the death of Sir Hyde Parker Bart, Captain Parker and aide decamp to Major General Eden succeeds to the Baronetcy, Capt Parker is the youngest brother of the gallant Captain Hyde Parker who fell in the service of his country shortly after the commencement of naval operations against Russia.

April 2nd 1856.

News of the Treaty of Peace being signed, arrived in Bury between 9 and 10 by telegraph, flags were hoisted on church towers and a bonfire was lit on the Angel Hill.

April 2nd 1856.

At the Suffolk Assizes, Emma Hollex, pleaded guilty to concealing the birth of a still born male child by secretly leaving it on a highway at Lavenham, the prisoner has since married, his Lordship said in view of all the circumstances she would be sentenced to 1 week's hard labour.

April 2nd 1856.

George Jackaman was charged with shooting at John Cook, a gamekeeper at Assington, Sudbury, with intent to commit murder. After a conversation between his Lordship and Mr Power who appeared for the prosecution his Lordship said there was not the slightest pretence of finding a bill in this case as Jackaman had heard rustling in the hedge and shot at what he thought was a rabbit and it was a strong thing to indict a man for murder and the case should not have got so far.

April 2nd 1856.

Emma, wife of Edward Musset of Nayland was charged with the wilful murder of her male infant on the 29th of February. Sentenced to death in the usual form.
A respite has been granted in respect of Emma Musset and to be detained during Her Majesty's pleasure.

April 16th 1856

The funeral of Sir Hyde Parker took place on Tuesday last. Sir William Hyde Parker attended as chief mourner accompanied by Mr N.C. Barnadiston his father in law and many gentry from the neighbourhood.

April 16th 1856

Death of Mr R.A. Allen of Ballingdon Grove. He expired very suddenly at the home of his brother Mr Mathew Allen in St Johns Wood, London. This sudden event has been received with sorrow among the many engaged in many branches of Mr Allen's mercantile business, the employees have lost an indulgent and liberal master and the poor of Ballingdon a kind and liberal benefactor.

April 23rd 1856.

We understand that the foundations of the new Union House at Ketton are nearly completed and that a considerable amount of brick earth has been found that the contractor is making bricks on the spot by steam machinery.

May 2nd 1856

On Saturday night two fat sheep were stolen from the field of Mr Ruffle of Melford. The skins etc. were left in the field.

May ? 1856.

Died at Glemsford on the 11th inst in his 46th year-Thomas Ambrose, farmer of Glemsford, leaving a wife,two sons and four daughters to lament his loss. He lived and laboured most indefatigably.

May 11th 1856.

At Sudbury Petty Sessions, a charge of assault was made against the Rev Charles Badham, vicar of All Saints at Sudbury by a boy named Bruce who said
I am a pupil at the Church of England school in the parish of All Saints, I had a teetotum given me that morning by Walter Nicholls. Alfred King, a pupil teacher asked me for it but I did not give it to him, Mr Fleming, a master, said "give it to me", I would not, he told me to stand against the desk, Mr Badham was at the other end of the school, he came up to me and asked what I was playing with, he asked me to give it up, I would not, he said "come with me", he shut the outer door leading to the street and asked for the teetotum again, I refused, he boxed my ears twice and shook me and made my head go against the wall twice, he boxed my ears twice more and nipped my ears and pulled them, I cried out as I was hurt, he told Mr Freeman to get the cane and flog me, I gave him my teetotum and went and sat in the gallery, I went home at dinner time at 12 and told my mother I felt sick, I did not get up next day as I fainted, mother went for the doctor, Mr Mason, who attended me for five days.
For the defence, Mr Shepherd said Mr Badham was superintended at the school.
Mr Mason, surgeon, said, I attribute his sickness to excitement, I am Mr Badham's medical attendant.
The Mayor said the punishment was excessive and the bench fined defendant the full 5 amount.

May 28th 1856.

A meeting was held by the Mayor of Sudbury to consider the best manner of providing a treat for the children to celebrate peace.

June 4th 1856.

Thursday is the day set aside for public rejoicing. A large party was entertained at Gt and Lt Thornham by Lady Henniker of Thornham Hall. The guests consisted of all the poor of the parishes of Gt and Lt Thornham with two members of each family from his Lordship's cottage tenantry in the parishes of Stoke Ash-Wickham Skeith-Gislingham-Braiseworth and Mellis, one from each cottage allottees, in all 600 in numbers. Dinner consisted of roast beef, plum pudding and beer in three tents on his Lordships property, toasts were proposed to the illustrious lady who rules these dominions.

June 4th 1856.

The little village of Stanningfield was full of life and joy on Thursday 29th when the children of the parish had a "treat".

June 4th 1856

Important Sale Of Wine. The whole cellar of rare wine which had been selected by the late Sir Hyde Parker regardless of cost.

600 dozen of fine old Madeira, Port, Sherry, Claret, Laffite, Hock, Champagne, Moselle, etc. 6 dozen of fine old Jamaica rum which has had 200 years in the bottle.

June 11th 1856.

Wednesday last was the day appointed for the Peace Treaty at Sudbury, the town was thronged with people from the neighbourhood with festoons of flowers, bowers and flags, the children of the schools numbering 1250 mustered on the Market Hill with banners and flags singing the National Anthem, a procession was formed and they marched to the Croft where 8 large tables were loaded with joints-roast beef and plum puddings, they afterwards engaged in games. The teachers amounting to 200 sat down to tea in the Town Hall. Mrs Fowke of Stour Street invited 66 poor people of Sudbury and Ballingdon to tea.

June 11th 1856.

There was a fatal accident at Culford on Thursday last when a carpenter named William Petch was employed in re-building the church when a sudden gust of wind blew down a large principal onto another which fell on his head while he was boring a piece of wood. He leaves a wife and 4 children.

June 11th 1856.

Great rejoicing took place at the King's Head at Gt Cornard in commemoration of the Peace when 50 people sat down to tea.

June 11th 1856.

Sale at Melford Hall of 1st class wines by instructions from the executors of the late Sir Hyde Parker.. 240 dozen of Malmsey and Madeira, rich and old-105 doz fine old sherry-85 doz of old bees wing port-75 doz of claret-17 doz of laffitte-16 doz of hock-8 doz champagne-6 doz of moselle-5 doz of bucellas-4 doz of various- 3doz of cognac brandy-6 doz old Jamaica rum, 200 years in the bottle.

June 25th 1856

The sale of wine at from the cellar of the late Sir Hyde Parker attracted a distinguished company. Sherry 63s to 100s per dozen.

Madeira 60s to 100s. Port to 120s. Claret 95s, Rum 200 years in the bottle 195s.

June 25th 1856

A few days since, Bacon, the gamekeeper at Tindone, Essex, to protect a nest of pheasant's eggs loaded a spring gun with stones broken glass and nails and remarking that " if anyone came that he wished to detain they would have to wait till his return the next morning". The next morning due to negligence and carelessness he neglected to disconnect the wire, he sprang the gun and the contents lacerated him in dreadful manner, amputation was performed but mortification set in and he died.

July 2nd 1856.

John Howard in his work on Lazarettos states that the last woman burnt in England was on June 25th 1788 when three men and one woman were burnt for coining, this was 2 years after the act was passed that any woman convicted of coining might be commuted by the crown to hanging.

July 16th 1856.

Henry Cooper, a butcher was charged with stealing a fat sheep from J.Goodchild of Kedington. 12 months hard labour.

July 16th 1856

William Fenn a carrier of Glemsford was charged with stealing 80 lbs of stover from the Rev Coldham of Glemsford. Not guilty.

July 16th 1856.

Alfred Finch, aged 13 was convicted of stealing I lamb from Semer, the property of Mr W. Coe. 14 days prison with 2 years in a reformatory.

July 23rd 1856.

William Sutton, a servant to Mr Crown, a farmer at Alpheton, was charged with furious driving, on the 10th inst. defendant was driving a tumbril with two horses laden with guano in Southgate Street, Bury, he was in such a state of intoxication as to be incapable of driving with the horses plunging from one side of the street to the other, it was found necessary to send another man from Alpheton to be in charge of the horses. Fined 10s and 25s costs.

August 6th 1856.

Inquest at Gt Thurlow on George Medcalfe, aged 45, who while working at the pug mill at Missen's brickyard when the beam to which the horses were attached, caught his head and crushed against the tub in which he was looking and fell down dead.

August 6th 1856.

Cricket-Haverhill v Clare. The match took place at the old Bailey ground at Clare, Haverhill carried the day with 74 runs.

August 27th 1856.

To be let or sold at Long Melford, Sudbury. A Commercial Inn and Posting House, known as the "The Bull Inn". With 12 acres of arable land and stabling for 30 horses, annual assemblies and rent and tithe audits are held at the above Inn.

August 27th 1856.

Pentlow Hall farm-live and dead stock to be sold by orders of the executors of the late William Orbell.

August 27th 1856

At a general meeting of the commissioners of Sudbury Borough, Mr Gotto the engineer engaged to alter the sewerage system of the town, recommended that the discharge into the river near Bullocks Lane would not be a nuisance.

August 27th 1856.

Malting Farm at Borley. To be sold, the live and dead stock by order of Mr Charles Adams.

September 17th 1856.

To innkeepers and others, Messrs Blunden and Squire will sell at Otten Belchamp at the Green Man Inn, the substantial business and well accustomed Inn known as the Green Man Inn, containing 2 entrances-bar parlour-club room measuring 21ft by 14ft-tap room-kitchen with malting chamber overhead-scullery-5 bedrooms-upper sitting room-brew house-large cellar and wood house-large gardens and pond. Lot 2 Detached genteel dwelling house with enclosed walled garden-iron palisade fence with keeping room-parlour-kitchen-pantry- 2 capital bedrooms-dressing room. Lot 3 - A range of 6 cottages with a lower room and a bedroom to each-detached bakehouse -office- mangle house and store. Frontage of 70 ft-producing 18 10s per annum.

September 17th 1856.

To be sold upon the premises at Borley Green Farm, Essex on 27th of September. The farming stock and agricultural implements etc, the property of Mr Henry Coker, gent, who is leaving the occupation. 5 chestnut horses-20 Welch bullocks, 6 of which are fat and the remaining are in a forward condition-quantity of swine-poultry-road and harvest wagons-4 load tumbrels-drill by Smith-ploughs-harrows-dressing machine-swathe rakes-tools and ladders, the sale commences at 12 noon, catalogues preparing.

September 17th 1856

Sale at Pentlow Hall of the live and dead stock of the late William Orbell. 15 horses-grey riding mare-28 steers-218 ewes- 60 lambs- and implements for 450 acres.

September 17th 1856

Green Man Inn, Belchamp Otten for sale. Two entrance halls-Bar parlour-Club room 21ft by 14ft-Taproom-Kitchen with malt chambers above-Scullery-Five bedrooms-Upper sitting room-Brew house- Large cellar-Coal and wood house-Large garden and yard.

September 17th 1856.

We understand that the Officer of the 1st Jager corps of the British German Legion who lately preffered a charge against a young woman at the Town Hall, Chelmsford, has quit the regiment.

September 24th 1856.

Sale at Half Way House farm between Lavenham and Melford , live and dead stock by order of James Coe-9 horses-4 cows-9 heifers-3 calves-30 swine.

September 24th 1856.

On Thursday the 11th the labourers on the Hardwick Estate near Bury were regaled with a bounteous dinner at which Mr Barret and his friends met them. The health of their kind benefactress ( Lady Cullum) was responded to in a way which shewed the good feeling which existed between employer and labourer. All retired at an early hour, thanking her Ladyship for again introducing on her Estate, the good old days of harvest home, the men are strictly forbidden to ask largesse of those persons in trade patronized by her Ladyship.

September 24th 1856.

At the County Petty Sessions at Bury, the Rev Sprigge of Brockley was charged with assaulting Mrs Sparke in her pew in the church. It appears that Mr and Mrs Sparke were owners and occupied a farm in the parish and had customary right to the pew in question to which Mr Sprigge also claimed a right from long usage for the use of his servants, Mrs Sparke, however refused to let the servant into the pew, Mr Sprigge in his surplice was about to proceed to his reading desk, came up to the pew and forced the door open and forcibly intruded the servant girl and in doing so hurt Mrs Sparke's hand and forced her to fall down on the seat.
Mr Sprigge at the suggestion of the Bench expressed regrets at the injury Mrs Sparkes sustained. Mrs Sparkes expressed herself satisfied and the parties retired.

September 24th 1856.

There was a serious accident at Mr Seeley's farm at Hengrave. John Newman was cleaning the stage on the threshing machine on Thursday morning when his foot slipped in to the machine, he was taken to Bury hospital where it was found necessary to amputate one foot.

September 24th 1856.

Letters to the Editor. Sir, pray assistance from passengers from the increasing nuisance which appears to be tolerated on the Eastern Counties Railway Company, on returning from Shoreditch on Monday last week, 3 or 4 persons commenced smoking and on being reminded they stated they could see no harm in it and puffed away until we reached Chelmsford. On appealing to the station master, he said smoking was not allowed but offered to find us another carriage, we declined and a porter directly after gave the "gents" a light at the door. Y. R.

October 1st 1856.

To be let for one year or from year to year---Superb family residence known as Pentlow Hall, about 5 miles from Sudbury and in excellent repair-containing entrance hall and vestibule-5 best and 3 servants bedrooms-dining and drawing room-library-kitchens-laundry-brew house-stable for 4 horses-coach house and buildings-gardener's cottage and lodge-well stocked pleasure grounds and walled gardens-orchards-paddock-ornamental water well stocked with fish-nearly 7 acres-good hunting in the neighbourhood-exclusive rights over shooting 250 acres-5 acres of pasture adjoining if desired.

October 1st 1856.

At the village of Gestingthorpe, a good dinner and tea was provided by the clergy and farmers of the parish to the labourers who they employ, together with their wives, upwards of 200 people had the treat in the school room and afterwards in a large booth erected on the lawn of the Hall, cricket and rural games were entered into and a band of music enlivened the scene, the decorum of the men was exemplary throughout the day.

October 8th 1856.

Married at Foxearth---Thomas Richard, son of the late Thomas Ruffle and grandson of Jeffery Golding Ruffle of Waltham Abbey and Clare, to Caroline, daughter of the late Henry Aucutt of Brighton.

October 6th 1856.

Melford and district have suffered great losses by dogs worrying and killing sheep at night. Mr C.H. Westropp and Mr Daniel Mills of Melford have had several killed and injured, last week Mr Coe of Acton and Mr Branwhite of Lavenham suffered considerable losses. A respectable farmer has had his two dogs killed on suspicion of being the depredators.

October 15th 1856.

During the past week there was shipped from Liverpool on board the Antarctica, a valuable cargo of horses-cattle-sheep and pigs for Mr Alexander of Kentucky whose name stands high as a purchaser of animals.

October 15th 1856.

Andrew Goodchild, a labourer in the employ of Mr Hawkins at Milden was charged with cruelly beating one of his master's horses. Fined 10s and 3s costs and to be committed to hard labour for 21 days. The fine was paid by him immediately.

October 15th 1856.

On Wednesday last, a little boy named Foreman was proceeding from Pakenham to school at Norton when he was met by two men in a donkey and cart, one jumped out and took the bag containing his dinner from him. Information was given to the police who apprehended a man named William Mayhew at Stowmarket.

October 15th 1856.

Inquest at Kersey on John Drywood aged 41 years who went into the barn of his employer to thrash some sheaves which were on the top of some more sheaves in the bay of the barn, shortly afterwards he was found lying on the floor bleeding and insensible with a sheaf lying near him, it appears he clambered up without the ladder which was nearby. Mr Muriel, surgeon, was fetched but he died, his right arm was broken and his skull fractured.

October 22nd 1856

On Tuesday last the wife of a labourer named Price was feeding a threshing machine upon the premises of Mr Joseph Dennis of Chilton Street, Clare, when she reeled and fell her, left arm went right down the mouth of the threshing machine, when she was extricated she was in a state of insensibility her arm being crushed to atoms and torn out of the socket. The poor woman was 63 years old and was subject to epileptic fits, she had been employed for a week in untying the wheat sheaves and was standing on the flat top of the machine. Accidental death.

October 22nd 1856

There was an inquest at Cavendish on the body of William Brown aged 66 who was seen to fall from a barrow he was sitting on. He was employed at scraping the road. Accidental death.

October 22nd 1856

The village of Poslingford has for the last 12 months been suffering from the fever. Out of a population of 370 there has been 35 cases with six deaths and two more expected to die. The attack begins with pain to the back of the head followed by delirium. Poslingford is situated on high ground but the cottages are small and closely built and thickly inhabited, at the back of most of them runs a large ditch which for want of heavy rains this last 18 months has accumulated a great deal of offensive matter from the houses which added to the scanty supply and bad quality of the water for domestic use has no doubt been the cause of this visitation. A subscription to dig a well has been set on foot and well digging has begun, at present without success, stringent measures have been adopted to compel the removal of offensive matter but there has been difficulty in enforcing cleanly habits.

October 27th 1856.

Inquest at the Angel Inn at Sudbury on George Harrison aged 7 years, son of Robert Harrison, a bargeman in the employ of Ray and Higgs, his father stated that the previous day he saw his child playing on a barge near the entrance to the basin near the coal yard, he called him and he came away but shortly after was missing, not finding him he went home and made enquiries, feeling apprehensive about the boy, he procured the assistance of Thomas Cawston, a coal porter and after a short search the body of the poor little fellow was pulled out of the river by a boat hook. It is supposed likely the boy in stepping from one barge to another missed his footing and fell in the water.

October 29th 1856

A serious affray took place on the night of 18th October, four men, Smith, East, Rogers and Easy were drinking in the White Horse, Lavenham, when a quarrel and fight took place between Smith and Rogers. On Smith leaving to go to Brent Eleigh he was followed by the others into the meadows and there beaten and kicked in a cruel manner that broke his ribs and they pressed into his lungs. The three men were apprehended and examined by magistrates at Boxford. Smith and East were committed to Bury gaol, Easy was bailed.

November 5th 1856.

On Wednesday last there was a serious accident at Horringer when George Durrant, a cowman, went into the cow-house to turn out a cow when the bull rushed him and pushed him against a haystack inflicting serious injuries, he lingered till Sunday morning then expired.

November 5th 1856.

Henry Twitchett for driving furiously on the highway without reins at Cavendish. 6 weeks.

November 5th 1856.

George Woodgate and George Cadge were charged with stealing turnips and a piece of wood at Acton. 21 days.

November 5th 1856.

For stealing a cow at Rattlesden, Orphia Sturgeon was committed, the cow was the property of Mr J.Rice.

November 9th 1856

A robbery was committed at Sudbury this last week on Monday evening when a pig was stolen, it belonged to a poor but honest man by the name of Hale, a say scourer by trade and living adjoining Church Walk. The pig was traced to North Street where it was found although with it's tail pulled off, it is supposed in trying to lift it out of it's stye. The parties are as yet unknown.

November 19th 1856.

Sudden death of Mr Robert Maplecroft of Stanstead. On Tuesday afternoon Mr Maplecroft went into the bank of Messrs Hoare's in Fleet Street, London, to pay in a sum of money, he observed to one of senior clerks that he had known him some years ago but the clerk did not recognise him, immediately he fell down dead.

November 19th 1856.

Henry Steggals of Woolpit was charged with stealing a pig from Frederick Williams, a sawyer of Fornham All Saints. Committed.

November 19th 1856.

John Frost was charged with stealing one piece of coal from Saxham railway yard. Committed.

November 19th 1856.

Sudbury Market. There was a large show of good wheat. White wheat to 76s-red wheat to 70s-grinding barley 30s-40s-Malting barley 50s -Oats to 32s -Peas to 42s -Mazagan to 44s per quarter.

November 19th 1856.

Robert Grinling of Lidgate, beer seller, for refusing to let p.c. Boutell in to his house. 40s with 8s costs.

November 19th 1856.

John Gypp and David Spearman of Denston for trespassing in search of game on land in occupation of Martin Slater at Stansfield. 40s or two months.

November 19th 1856.

The Sun beerhouse, situated in Hall street, Melford, for sale.

December 3rd 1856

A few days since a man in the employ of a plumber at Ongar in Essex purchased at a sale an old fashioned high backed chair.
The wife had a mattress to re-stuff and thinking the hair in the chair would answer the purpose cut it open and found a small parcel containing seven fine diamonds which were valued at 7L each.

December 3rd 1856.

At Hedingham Petty Sessions. William Elsden, labourer of Toppesfield was charged with stealing a pig form James Bridge, farmer of Toppesfield. The prosecutor said defendant was working near his premises when he missed the pig, he asked defendant if he had seen it, he said no. The prosecutor was suspicious of defendant and kept watch on him and at about 5 the same evening saw him carrying a guano bag, on examining it he found a pig in it. Defendant said the wheel of his cart went over it and he thought no-one would know if I took it. Dismissed.

December 3rd 1856.

Important sale at Benacre Hall Farms in Suffolk by orders of Sir Edward Sherlock Gooch. 72 horses-4 donkeys-12 shorthorn cows-one bull-73 oxen-558 ewes, tups etc-72 swine-200 poultry. On the 23rd 24th and 25th of December.

December 3rd 1856.

The latest severe weather has brought to the neighbourhood -a little auk at Sicklesmere - Slovenian grebe to Saxham - the Crake to Newmarket and the Great Ash coloured shrike to Livermere.

December 3rd 1856.

Henry Farrow and his wife Sarah of Lawshall were charged with stealing a tea caddy from the Jolly Waggoner in Mustow Street in Bury, their residence was not known but P.C. Graves traced them to Lawshall. Remanded.

December 10th 1856

On Sunday morning last at about nine o'clock, Thomas Shepard Ewer a large farmer at Foxearth, (Western End), put a period to his life in a extraordinary manner. The family having waited for breakfast after he had left the house an unusually long time, searched for him and he was found in the privy, the door of which he had fastened on the inside, quite dead. He had not suspended himself from any part but his handkerchief was around his neck as to prove fatal to him. It appears he was a man in good circumstances and much respected, he left a wife and a large family to deplore their loss.

Note:-The Ewer family seem to have had a good deal of bad luck through the years. In the summer of 1858 the family who were still living at Western End farm lost three children from Diphtheritis, there is a memorial to them in Foxearth churchyard which is now a listed monument. It reads, Maria Ewer aged 6 years-Mary Ewer aged 16 years-Harry John Ewer aged 12 years- Thomas Chickall aged 10 years. Thomas Chickall, I would think was a cousin. Samuel Vial who's body was later snatched from Foxearth churchyard farmed at Lower Hall, Foxearth, was Mrs Ewer's father. In the 1851 census Thomas William Chickall was two years old and living with his parents at Clarrit Hall, Ashen.
In 1893 the farm buildings at Western Hall were burnt down, only the farmhouse being saved, Charles Shepard Ewer, a brother of dead children was then the tenant. In December 1945, the son of Charles Shepard Ewer, John Shepherd Ewer, committed suicide by drowning in the pond at Claypits Hall, Foxearth.

December 24th 1856.

On Thursday last there was a great show of meat in Sudbury and Ballingdon and was superior to other years, the whole of Mr Brock's premises in North Street was taken up by 600 brace of pheasants-100 hares-50 wild fowl, his show of beef- mutton-geese-rabbits was large and splendid. Messrs Brown, Bear and Collis of Sudbury also exhibited large quantities of beef and mutton, Messrs Nice and Andrews of Ballingdon exhibited a large quantity of beef-mutton and also a large quantity of fruit.

December 31st 1856.

Henry Cornish, innkeeper of Stanningfield was charged with assaulting his nephew, James Cornish. The Bench bound both over to keep the peace.

December 31st 1856.

An Angus Dei which was introduced into the Christmas decorations at St Peter's church in Sudbury has been removed by the church wardens, J. Grover who with many parishioners are dissatisfied with the Tractarian proceedings of the incumbent.

December 31st 1856.

On Sunday morning the temperature dropped to 8 above zero.

December 31st 1856.

Inquest at Milden on William Webb who was found dead in a field. Natural death.

December 31st 1856

On Saturday week a labourer from Boxford named Griggs had been offering for sale some gold and silver coins, inquiries were instituted by Inspector Whitcombe and it was ascertained that Griggs and other labourers had found several hundred old coins while " stocking up" in a wood in the occupation of Mr Daniel Tiffin of Boxford.
The treasure consists chiefly of half crowns, shillings and gold nobles of the reign of Elizabeth, some half nobles were from the reign of Henry 7th. All were in an excellently preserved state and were found loosely scattered in the earth near the surface. It is supposed that they are part of the proceeds of a burglary committed at Colchester a few years ago for which several men known as the " Kersey Gang" were transported and who at the time were suspected of hiding part of the booty in " Justice Wood" which appears to lie in the parish of Polstead.