The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1855 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive


The news in Britain in 1855

January 3rd 1855.

The Rev J.C. Coleman has recently been presented with the living of Clare, he left Gestingthorpe last week amidst regrets from the parishioners.

January 3rd 1855.

Friday's Gazette contains a list of promotions among them is Lieut Clement H.J. Heigham to be captain without purchase of the 68th Foot. (perhaps the Capt Heigham who later owned Houghton Hall, Cavendish) (G.H)

January 3rd 1855.

Letter received from Sebastopol by Mr Mills of Lavenham, a boot and shoe maker.

Dear Father and Mother,
My health is good and hoping you are all well at home, we are in a sad condition, we are stationed about 600 yards from Sebastopol and expected to be at attention every day, we are covered in vermin, officers as well, provisions are bad, on some days we get only 4 ozs of meat and we are cold, I am accustomed to shots and shells over our heads, remember me to all my friends and give my love to my sisters and brothers, kiss them for me.
From your affectionate son,

C.H. Mills
2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade.

January 10th 1855.

At Suffolk Quarter Sessions. James Barber who wore the uniform of the East Suffolk Artillery was charge with stealing a box containing 10 from a the shop of Robert Nicholson, grocer of Halesworth. A boy aged about 12 years confessed to stealing the box and said he did it at the request of the prisoner who waited in the street for him, when he got out witness gave him a sovereign and on his advise he absconded with the box and the money but was stopped at Saxmundham two days later.
Acquitted.

January 10th 1855.

Money Martin was charged with stealing a muck fork at Norwich Quarter Sessions.
14 years penal servitude.

January 10th 1855.

William Baldry, livery and stable keeper of Norwich was charged with stealing six bullocks from James Armstrong of Dumfries from a field in Arminghall. The prisoner went to Diss station with the six bullocks to send to Bury fair but there was no truck for them and they were taken to the Railway Tavern and sent the next day.
15 months hard labour.

January 10th 1855.

James Sillitoe of the Ship and Star beer house at Sudbury, was charged with on Sunday last, sold beer during Divine Service, the witnesses were Borough Constables and the statements they made were contradictory.
Dismissed.

January 10th 1855.

Fire broke out at Mill Farm, Stanstead, on Monday morning last in occupation of Daniel Alston and belonging to Capt E.S.Bence of Kentwell Hall.
It appears that Mr Alston's man left only a hour before with a load of corn towards Sudbury. A barn containing 40 coombs of threshed barley and the produce of 8 acres of wheat were destroyed with the stable and lodge.
The man from the cottage in the yard lost no time in securing the live stock which consisted of 14 bullocks and two horses. The fire is a mystery.

January 10th 1855

Thomas Sillitoe of the Ship and Star, Sudbury, was summoned for selling beer during divine service. Dismissed.

January 17th 1855.

Died at Scutari hospital of diarrhooea in his 24th year, Corporal Martin Spenceley of the 1st Battallion Rifle Brigade, the eldest son of Mr M.Spenceley of Lackford Hall in Suffolk. He had partially recovered from wounds received at Sebastopol which rendered him unfit for future service, he underwent severe hardships also in the Caffre war.

January 24th 1855.

The following is an extract from one of the nurses in Scutari.

Miss Nightingale says the flannel jackets and flannel shirts are quite pounced on as soon as they are made, we can only make a limited amount.
Most Englishmen can imagine sour bread which is all that is to be had over here and bad butter, a stolen scrape is a luxury to a dying man.
Could not some casks of butter be sent from England and marked for the sick and wounded? Men who are used to strict cleanliness are now offered one comb between four men.

January 31st 1855

As labourers were excavating in the brickfields at the Grove, Ballingdon, at about 15ft from the surface they found the tusk of a mammoth. The teeth of this extinct species have been found in Lamarsh and Brundon, they are in the possession of Mr Fulcher of Sudbury.

January 31st 1855.

Died at Lawshall aged 70 years, Thomas Stannard, for 36 years gardener at Coldham Hall.

February 14th 1855.

Valuable timber to be sold at Pentlow Hall at Stetch meadow drift on the road from Clare to Cavendish, quantity of superior Canadian Poplar, ash, elm and willow.

February 21st 1855.

A paper has been handed in to us containing a series of letters and extracts for the purpose of placing beyond doubt the claim of the Rev W.B. Clarke, the incumbent of St Leonards, Sydney and formerly of East Bergholt in Suffolk, that he had been the original discover of gold in Australia. In evidence before a Select Committee on Goldfields in 1852, Mr. Clarke stated he crossed the dividing range to the west of Paramatta when he became aware of the existence of gold in Australia.

February 28th 1855.

Plea for crow keepers.
What could be a more miserable than to send some poor children for months together, Sundays alike, badly fed and worse clothed without shelter, exposed to snow and frost without comfortable and frequent salutations or worse should any of their sable enemies gain foothold on one corner of the field.
I have introduced four huts or sentry boxes which are planted in the centre of pea field to the delight of the poor children and their parents, they are light and durable and portable and cost 18s each. It adds much to the comfort of many helpless boy or girl.

February 28th 1855

There was an inquest at Cavendish on Walter Wells aged three years who was left in the care of his ten year old sister while his mother went to church. The sister wanting to get some water from the brook took the child to his grandfather across the road where there were two other grandchildren in the house, the grandfather did not miss the child when he slipped out back to his own house and in a few minutes returned with his clothes alight. Mr Waring the surgeon was called out of church but the poor child died next day.

March 7th 1855.

Died on the 12th ult at the hospital in Scutari of dysentery in his 25th year, John Parkeson DeCarle, only son of Joseph DeCarle of Sicklesmere.

March 14th 1855.

The sum of 20 has been added to the Sudbury Patriotic Fund by the parish of Cavendish making the total to 658.

March 14th 1855.

Lazarus Hemstead, aged 49 who was indicted for the murder of his wife Anne. It appears both were engaged in the silk factory in Halstead and resided in the town with their five children. On the night of November 3rd 1854, the family went to bed, when they got up their unhappy mother was dead, a few hours after the prisoner was at Lt Cornard, about 10 miles off and made inquires for the parish constable when he gave himself up. The Governor and the Surgeon of the gaol where he was confined, proved, during his stay, he nearly died from starvation.
Not guilty and to be detained during her Majesty's pleasure.

April 4th 1855.

Lyston Rectory. Messrs Blunden and Squire will sell by auction on the premises on April 11th at 11 o' clock, the valuable house-hold furniture and effects of the late Rev Thomas Wallis.

April 11th 1855

At Bury market fat beasts were making 7s 6d a stone.
Fat sheep 7s to 8s a stone. Fat Hogs-6s 6d to 7s a stone. Fat calves 7s 6d to 8s a stone. Wheat at Sudbury market 68s a quarter.

April 18th 1855.

On Wednesday morning about 10, fire broke out on the premises of Mr Porter of Walsham Le Willows, it destroyed the dwelling house-barn carts-stables-cow house, several implements and outbuildings.
The fire was caused by one of Mr Porters children, a 4 year old who found some lucifer matches on the floor of the back kitchen and went to play with another child in the dog kennel which was formed from hurdles and straw, he ran home to his mother who tried with the labourers to remove the furniture, the adjoining gig house which was thatched was burning rapidly , the wind was too strong.
Mr Porter who is the owner was on his way to Bury market at the time.

April 18th 1855.

Mary Wordley of Glemsford for leaving her children to the charge of the parish. 21 days.

April 18th 1855.

For sale at Edwardstone and Gt Waldingfield a farm called Flushing Farm 14 acres? In occupation of Amos Tiffen whose tenancy expirers at Michaelmas.

April 18th 1855.

Mr Brassey, the railway contractor, has it is said, constructed upwards of 500 miles of track, representing an aggregate of 9,250,000 of contract money, what shall we put as profit. (builder).

April 18th 1855.

William Palmer and Charles Halls were charged with setting fire to Risby Heath, 35 acres of gorse and herbage was destroyed. 3 with 15s costs or 2 months hard labour.

April 25th 1855.

On Wednesday last, fire broke out on the premises of Thomas Chinery of New Hall, Belchamp St Pauls in Essex and the property of Ambrose Smith of Cavendish, property destroyed , barn-stables-cow-house-pig sty's etc-sheds-bean stack the produce of 10 acres-quantity of unthreshed wheat and barley-tares-hay. The cottages abutting the premises were saved with great difficulty, the fire is a mystery.
Mr Chinery was not insured.

May 2nd 1855.

Died at Brook Hall Foxearth, Essex on the 25th ult-Mr Orbell aged 49 years from injuries received by being thrown out of a gig whilst returning from Bury market that day 3 weeks. He leaves a wife and 8 children to bemoan his irreparable loss.

May 2nd 1855.

On Saturday night, some persons entered the mill of Mr Stephen Ruse of Hargrave and stealing therefrom 17 stones of flour, they were so determined in their work they broke 3 doors open with strong locks and irons on them. No clues at present to find the guilty persons.

May 2nd 1855.

An old proverb says accidents seldom come alone, a range of cottages abutting the high road at Lt Waldingfield, one of which a short time ago had Game for a tenant and who has lately died in Bury gaol, has a small history attending to it. Mr Game's doings made these cottages shunned, the tenants fled as if from the plague.
The proprietor seeing no benefit accruing from empty tenements got a bid and let them go, since then two of the three are occupied as houses are scarce and the frightening got over, on Friday the 20th they had a narrow escape from being purified by a fire, a neighbour passing about midnight saw flames bursting from the back door and gave the alarm, a large family sleeping next door where flames were blowing toward them, their escape was providential.
The origin of the fire was from a oven next door.

May 9th 1855.

Letter from Crimea which was received by Mr Robert Stewart of Lavenham from his son before Sebastopol,

My Dear parents,
I received your letter yesterday, glad you are all well, my health is very good, you need not fear for my safety at present as I am one of the drivers in the Ambulance Corps and not likely to get wounded unless I am careless.
This corps was first formed by old pensioners but they were found to be such a drunken lot they could not be trusted and most have been sent home and men from different regiments have taken their place.
I can assure you we see some awful sights from shot and shell, we are constantly at work, when I first came out here I had regular duty and went to the trenches every other night, perhaps you don't know what a trench is so I will explain, this is the place where all the men get wounded, you have a ditch at home, well imagine one where 6 men can walk abreast, these trenches are about 2 miles from Sebastapol and the men who's turn it is to work will work for 24 hours pushing them forward, they have already progressed so far as to nearly reach the Russians, each party can hear the other coughing etc.
The Russians are constantly alert and if they discover our whereabouts a constant shower of grape shot and shell is poured upon us.
Waggons full of wounded soldiers continually pass on their way to different hospitals, we have silenced the Round Tower, last night they attacked the French as well as us.
Charles Lungley is in a good situation and out of danger, he is employed in building huts for troops, he desires to be remembered to his two sisters and friends.
Give best wishes to all relations and accept the same for yourselves.

Your affectionate son,
Wm Stewart.

May 14th 1855.

The Colchester and Stour Valley, Sudbury and Halstead railway Bill passed through the house of Lords on the 8th inst.

May 14th 1855.

Red House and Guyon's estate at Yeldham for sale-161 acres 2 roods 20 perches.

May 14th 1855.

On Thursday evening at 9-30, a straw stack belonging to William Wiffen of Lawshall was discovered to be on fire, labouring people gave prompt assistance with pails and by their exertions the fire was confined to the straw stack which was destroyed.

May 14th 1855.

A Russian pipe was taken from a Russian who fell in the trench before Sebastapol was taken by a soldier in the 94th who has returned home invalided and he has brought it to us in Bury for inspection, it is of better taste than exhibited in this country, the stem is about 2 inches in length and is clasped by foliage, the bowl is in the shape of an expanded flower.

May 14th 1855.

On Tuesday, a boy in the employ of Messrs Nunn and Hinnel in Bury, was found lying insensible in the back warehouse, he was taken to Bury hospital and a stomach pump was used on him, it appears from the boy's own admission he had helped himself too freely to the spirits of wine.

May 21st 1855

There was an inquest at Glemsford on Walter Slater aged four, who when his mother went for a pail of water set fire to himself.
After three weeks suffering he died. Accidental death.

May 23rd 1855.

Last wek the premises of the late Thomas Ardley and Mr Meekings of Melford and the premises of the late Rev Wallace of Liston was robbed of a quantity of lead.

May 30th 1855.

Died on the 10th inst in his 25th year of fever at the hospital in Balaklava. After having engaged in the battle of Alma and Balaklava and Inkerman without receiving injury, Christmas Edward Dogget, of the Coldstream Guards and brother of Sgt Dogget of Bury.

June 6th 1855.

Through the judicious exertions of Sgt Keeble of Wickhambrook and district, 4 suspicious characters have been committed for trial, Mr Dennis of Wickhanbrook having lost a sheep, this officer traced the footmarks and wool across the fields to Bubble Green at Hundon, he obtained a search warrant and with the assistance of Supt Death found a sheepskin buried in a garden and a quantity of mutton beneath the bedstead of Thomas Ling. Committed.

June 6th 1855.

A poor woman of Denston had lost some ducks, from facts elicited the house of Thomas Cooper was entered and some ducks were found boiling over the fire in the residence of father and son. Committed.

June 6th 1855.

An officer was watching the mill and premises of Mr Woolard of Wickhambrook when about 12 at midnight a noise was heard, after waiting 20 minutes, Thomas Murlin was captured as he was leaving the premises with about 2 bushels of wheat and picklock keys in his possession. Committed.

June 6th 1855.

On Monday at about noon, fire broke out on an off-hand farm called The Ark at Cavendish, the property of Mr Samuel Viall of Foxearth, it destroyed the stables-cow shed and several loads of straw, fortunately the dwelling house escaped with slight damage, water being scarce the fire was allowed to burn itself out from the rapidity of the wind and was a heap of ruins, Cavendish fire engine attended but nothing could be done. The fire was occasioned by children playing with lucifer matches.

June 6th 1855.

Inquest at Tattingstone on George Scott aged 13 in the service of Mr Clarke, he was driving the horses of a two horse engine for crushing oats and fell off the driving board onto the ground, the wheels going over him he was taken up quite dead.

June 13th 1855.

Outrage by the Militia---
On Thursday last, Mathias Fairweather, Joseph Webb, Alfred Barrel and seven other men, privates in the Militia were charged with causing a disturbance in the Suffolk Hotel in Bury. In evidence, Thomas Darkins, the boots, said that about 4 am on Wednesday morning he was awoken by a disturbance in the passage and his door forcibly opened by about 10 militia men who were billeted in the house, he went to bed at 12, Mrs Everard said the gates were to be closed and if the militia came home they were not to be opened.
William Firman, under boots, said the soldiers entered the room where he and Darkins slept, Webb began knocking him about.
All except the 3 to be dismissed and they to pay 40s each which amounted to 70s or hard labour for 14 days.

June 13th 1855.

James Sargent aged 13 was charged with stealing 6 plough shares from his employer, Mr Payne of Hawstead, Mr Payne said the boy was induced to do so by a marine store dealer.
To be privately whipped and discharged.
James Dutton, son of the marine store dealer was charged with receiving plough shares from Sargent and admitted giving him 4d for six shares.
Committed.

June 13th 1855.

Inquest at Bardwell on George Coe 66 who was found drowned in a ditch which was 4 inches deep.
Found drowned.

June 13th 1855.

Inquest at Newton, Sudbury, on Edward Lingley 64 who was riding on a waggon of bricks when he fell off onto his head and the wheels went over him.
Accidental.

June 13th 1855.

On Saturday week, a thunder storm passed over Castle Hedingham, a ploughman being at work on Great Lodge farm, stood with his team for shelter at the head of one of the horses, the lightning at that instant struck the head of the horse which dropped down dead, the other being unhurt as well as the man.

June 13th 1855.

On Saturday last, a man named Bruce, employed by Mr Hugh Green of Newton Hall, Sudbury, was harrowing with two boys to help clean the harrows which was done by partially raising the harrows but by carelessness a harrow was thrown over upon the heels of a horse which took off in fright and plunging violently it fell upon the projecting teeth, the horse which was worth 100 guineas has since died.

June 13th 1855.

Died recently at Orsett in Essex in the Union House, James Hymas aged about 78, he was one of three men cast for the mutiny at the Nore with Admiral Parker and had the rope actually placed around his neck ready to swing off. After that he was taken prisoner by the French and was in prison for many years, he escaped a few days before peace was declared and the accumulation of wages and prize money amounted to upwards of 800 on his arrival at London, such was his abandoned ways, he was obliged to go to sea again.

June 20th 1855.

Married at Middleton in Essex by the Rev Skinner, the senior curate of St Barnabas, Pimlico, John Greene of Bury to Katharine, third daughter of the Rev Oliver Raymond, rector of Middleton and vicar of Bulmer cum Belchamp.

June 20th 1855.

The coat of arms which we lately announced was to be placed in the window of Groton Church as memorials of the former Lords of the Manor of Groton were set up last week.

June 27th 1855.

About 16 years ago, there was living in the parish of Stanton near Bury, a young hard working lad named Daniel Calver, all his friends were poor and if any jobs were to be done, laborious or disagreeable "Nape" Calver was the the chap to do it.
He was engaged by a gentleman to go out to Van Dieman's Land as a labourer, after a time he contracted to do canal work for the sum of 70, he engaged other labourers and paid them well and completed the work to the satisfaction of his employer and saved sufficient to purchase 10 acres of land, this enabled him to undertake similar work and he became prosperous enough to buy 300 acres and cleared 1500 by this transaction and keep 200 acres for himself.
He had a great desire to visit his native land, his relations and friends in the parish of Stanton and the good people of Stanton were surprised a few days since by the arrival of a carriage laden with boxes being driven into the Cock Inn and containing "Nape" Calver with his wife and children, his friends were delighted to see him, he is stated to have brought 5000 with him and would like to settle some business in his native land but if he should not succeed to his mind he would return to Van Dieman's Land for where we are informed he gets 100 annually from.

June 27th 1855.

At Walter Belchamp to be sold under instructions of the trustees of Joseph Orbell.
Valuable property.
Lot 1 -Water Mill with all the gears, possesses excellent head of wate-2 pairs of French stones-capital malting of 24 coombe steep-2 floors-malt chamber-malt store-cart lodge-stables-piggeries
- well built dwelling house with parlour-keeping room-kitchen-cellar-5 bed rooms-walled garden-detached brewhouse-meadow-chaise way and about 3 acres of pasture on Belchamp Common.
This lot is in occupation of Thomas Ruse and in excellent repair- stowage for 500 quarters of corn.

June 27th 1855.

Inquest at Hinderclay on Bloss Fox 47 who while riding on the shafts of an empty waggon attempted to get down while going at a trot he fell with the wheels going over him.

July 4th 1855

On Tuesday last on an off hand farm occupied by Capt Jaques of Great Waldingfield was destroyed by fire, a stack and three tenements were destroyed. From information discovered by the police it appears the fire was discovered in a haulm wall leading from the cottage to the barn. A child of 2 to 3 was seen standing nearby and it had been playing with matches.

July 18th 1855.

Thomas Ling for stealing a sheep at Wickhambrook from J.W.Dennis.
14 years transportation.

July 18th 1855.

At Bury Petty Sessions, Samuel Mower of the Castle Inn was charged with assaulting Harriet Creaton of Brockley. It appears that complainant came with Thomas Mead of Whepstead who was her father's executor, on business to Mr Wing, the solicitor, and accompanied him to the Castle Inn, She was about to enter the bar parlour when defendant pushed her out into the passage saying " you be walking" then to Mr Mead "Tom you should be ashamed, a man with a large family bringing in a harlot here".
Fined 20s with costs.

July 18th 1855.

Extracts from a letter sent by William Hubbard who emigrated from Bardwell in Suffolk to Australia in October last.

We are up in the bush by the side of a spring water river which is a blessing in this country, we had a drought with 1000's of heads of stock dying from the want of water.
Our river abounds with fish-ducks-geese and wild turkeys, free to anyone, plenty of opossums and kangaroos but no game, we have plenty of beef and some potatoes, you travel for miles and never see a house, we have a good master, we let ourselves, Tom ,Sam and me for 130 a year and plenty of beef and flour, as much as we can eat and plenty of sugar and tea, we have a wooden house and plenty of wood to burn, all free, we have nothing to buy but soap and clothes so that if we are spared we may have 100's of pounds next year, our master is going to build us a new house, he has only three men besides us, we are going to have three cows if Harriet will milk them.
My master could not get hands this last year so all the corn blew out, he has a reaping machine now, we travelled up by coach, I cannot describe the roads, full of cracks, stumps and holes, the country above us is mountainous that it appears to meet the sky, it abounds with gold, iron and tin.
Gold diggers pass from one digging to another, we had to get off the coach about a mile away, the master paid the fare, this is the place to save money, England is the place to spend it.
We had a long voyage, 120 days, 7 people died and 7 were born, two sailors were drowned near the Bay of Biscay, give my duty to Mr Dunlop and ask him to thank the gentlemen who subscribed for me, tell George Willis that beer and rum are the same price, if a man keeps from the ale house he must have money.
It is now March and as hot as August, flies are numerous and magpies, cockatoos, parrots and laughing jackasses, there are plenty of pumpkins and melons, we kill bullocks and throw away the heads and pluck, my master gave me a new table, bed, bedstead, stool, iron pots, pails and a frying pan.
If we are spared we shall be our own master in about 10-12 years, we may come home and be independent, if Robert would like to come let us know and we shall pay his fare.

William Hubbard, at Mr Pring's .
Jugiong,
near Bass in New South Wales.

August 1st 1855

Mr W.Rolfe has been favoured with instructions from Caledon Alexander of the Aubries, Bulmer, to sell by auction at Armsey farm, Bulmer, 1000 pure bred Southdown sheep, the above have been bred from stock of the Duke of Richmond, Jonas Webb, Lugar and Harris.

August 3rd 1855.

A  poor widow from Mount Bures in Suffolk, has three sons fighting for their country in the Crimea, a fourth son is in the Essex Rifles at Colchester.

August 3rd 1855.

Suffolk Summer Assizes.
James Brown and Ann Driver were charged with assaulting William Maxim at Cavendish. The prosecutor, a shepherd from Glemsford, said he was went to see his father with Henry Oakley, at 8-30 they went into the White Horse Inn and stayed two hours, when they came out he had 4s d in his pocket, he went up Cavendish street and part of the way home with his father, Oakley had waited for him, on leaving his father he turned to go back again to Glemsford, about an hour before leaving he saw Ann Driver with James Brown, he next saw her as he was going home when she caught him by the neck and pushed him down, he called out and two men came and one said "if you don't hold your tongue they would knock his brains out", Brown knelt on him and the woman took his money, when he called "partner", they ran away, he got up and went in search of the prisoner, he found both of them and gave them into the custody of Supt Death, he was perfectly sober.
Cross examined, he said it was Cavendish Fair but he did not go to any booth till after he was robbed, he did not see the men until they knelt on him.
Henry Oakley corroborated the evidence. Mr Bulwer said it was extraordinary that a strong young fellow like Maxim could be pushed down by a woman if he was not drunk.
Acquitted .

August 3rd 1855.

John Whiting, a little boy of 11 years, pleaded guilty to setting fire to a stack of haulm at Wattisham, the property of Pricilla Pilgrim.
To be transported for 14 years.

August 3rd 1855.

During the storm on Monday night at Colchester, a swallow which had built it's nest in the chimney of the tap room of the Lamb Inn, the nest fell down into the firegrate which was empty, since then the little family are comfortable in their new domicile and are paid numerous visits by the old birds who contrive to fly up and down the chimney to visit their twittering progeny.

August 8th 1855.

A child of about 12-13 in Bury is afflicted with St Vitus Dance, the parents were advised the only remedy was to charm it away and accordingly on Saturday night music was provided and the child kept dancing for three hours, the charm is to be repeated until a cure is affected.

August 8th 1855.

A letter has arrived from the Crimea dated July from a native of Lt Thurlow. Daniel \Webb of the 6th company, 30th regiment says the company went out 105 strong and only 5 of that number are left, he speaks of being entrenched within 50 yards of the Tower.

August 22nd 1855.

A trial of a Bells reaping machine will be exhibited in operation at Mr Stedman's at Pakenham in Suffolk on Thursday next, it will be the first exhibition in this county and we have no doubt will be attended by visitors from afar.

August 22nd 1855.

On Friday afternoon, Frederick Lawrence of Cockfield met with severe injuries, he had just finished oiling the threshing machine when before he could remove his hand his shirt became entangled in the wheel, he was taken to Bury hospital where Mr Smith the surgeon, after consultation with his colleagues, advised to remove his arm below the elbow.

August 22nd 1855.

An accident happened at the Gt Thurlow Hall lands when a poor boy named Barret, employed in taking wild oats off the peas, fell off one of the heaps when loading the waggon while it was in motion, no bones were broken.

September 5th 1855.

The following letter has been received from Corporal Mills from Lavenham..

Kubilee, 14th of August 1855.
Hope this finds you well, it leaves me quite very poorly for I have had several attacks of fever. I was out of my head for a fortnight and could not eat anything but thank God I am getting better, when I was in my own hospital at the camp the doctor behaved kindly to me, he used to give me 4-6 gills of wine a day, that was the only thing that kept me alive and I got chicken and beef tea.
I came down here on the 31st of July and they have shown me all kindness, we can have anything we like.
We have a very nice nurse, her name is Miss Taylor, we have women nurses and they pay us great attention.

September 5th 1855.

On Thursday morning there was a fire at Chadacre Hall farm, the property of the Misses Halifax, it consumed two large stacks of wheat and one of oats.

September 5th 1855.

Sale of live and dead stock at Brundon Hall, Sudbury, the property of the late William Baker. 14 horses-14 handsome dairy cows-Suffolk bull-135 sheep-109 head of swine and implements for 500 acres.

September 12th 1855.

Warning to labourers. At the County Petty Sessions at Bury. Joseph Windward, a labourer, a harvestman employed by Mr John Muskett was charged with doing work badly at Lackford. Mr Spencely, bailiff to Mr Muskett said defendant was engaged for harvest and was employed in mowing seed clover but doing his work so very badly, not cutting clean or low, the bailiff and his own partners remonstrated with him but he continued to do his work badly, the bailiff directed him to leave off work and obtained a sum against him. The bench said an abatement of 18s 6d to be made from his wages.

September 12th 1855

FOXEARTH NEAR SUDBURY TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION BY MESSRS BLENCOE AND BIDDELL
On Thursday 20th of September at the Rose and Crown Hotel, Sudbury, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, by direction of the Trustee under a power of sale, the under mentioned ESTATES, well situated in the pleasant village of Foxearth within three miles of Sudbury.

Lot 1-An enclosure of rich arable land adjoining the mill premises and containing about an acre
Lot 2-Is situated on the opposite side of the road and contains two and a half of excellent arable land together with a cottage and garden adjoining thereto, occupied by Messrs Inch and Eady and another cottage and garden adjoining occupied by Messrs Golding, Inch and Deal.

The above lots are Freehold
Lot 3-A double Tenement and garden in the Street occupied by Maxim and Farrant. Copyhold.

Lot 4-The Lion Beerhouse occupied by Mr E.Deal wherein a good retail trade is conducted, pleasantly situated in the Street and containing good rooms and offices, Yard garden etc. Copyhold.

Lot 5-The neat genteel residence of Miss Ince which contains entrance hall, dining and drawing rooms, keeping room, kitchens and store closets, seven bedrooms, detached scullery, bake house, brew house and tub house. Two stables and granary over chaise house, large and productive kitchen garden in the rear and neat fancy grounds in the front and an enclosure of valuable pasture adjoining. A malting office of about 12 coombs steep. A dwelling nearly adjoining occupied by Mrs Scott.

A dwelling house and shop occupied by D.Branwhite. Also adjoining the residence of Miss Ince in the tenure of Chinery and Maxim.

This lot is all freehold and contains about two acres.

The property is well deserving the attention of those who are seeking investments in a respectable locality from which high rates of interest will arise and offers eligigble opportunities for securing votes for tha Northen Division of Essex. Futher particulars from Mr Tiffen or Mr F.Eldridge Wash, solicitors, Sudbury or the auctioneers at Bradfield Lodge and Hawstead Hall

September 12th 1855

To be sold by auction the live and dead stock of the late Mr William Baker of Brundon Hall, Sudbury. 15 powerful horses-14 choice Shorthorn cows and a handsome Shorthorn bull-43 bullocks-135 lambs-34 fat sheep-100 swine and implements for 500 acres.

September 19th 1855.

Hopkins farm at Walter Belchamp. To be sold, the live and dead stock of Mr Thomas Hutton whose tenancy expires. 7 horses-40 sheep-40 lambs-20 swine-implements.

September 19th 1855.

At Alpheton-live and dead stock at Clapstile farm and Buxtons for sale .

September 19th 1855.

At Moors farm, Assington, Sudbury. Live and dead stock-5 full sized North Devon working oxen with harness-174 sheep-implements for 450 acres, by direction of Mr Thomas Hawkins whose lease expires.

September 26th 1855

The property of the late Mr William Perry a builder of Clare came under the hammer on Wednesday last. Notwithstanding the reputation attached to Mr Perry as a man of property, it was found on his decease that he had left creditors to such an amount of mortgage that as to entirely absorb his property.

September 26th 1855.

On Sunday morning as Samuel Boreham of Lavenham was walking to work at he discovered the body of a newly born male child in the middle of the road where it appears it was born, the body was taken to Mr Barkway, surgeon of Lavenham who pronounced it was a 6 month child, from information obtained p.c. Cauldwell proceeded to the house of Mr George Horlex of Preston whose niece Emma kept house,
Emma Horlex denied all knowledge of but a search was made last evening and evidence was discovered, a warrant for her arrest was issued and she remains at Boxford police station until Wednesday on concealment of birth.

September 26th 1855.

Death of Major Stedman, the youngest son of Mr E. Stedman of Bell Vue, Sudbury. Deceased was an officer in the Turkish Cavalry contingent and was on board the "Trent" on his way to Constantinople when the painful event occurred, he was a Captain in the 10th Royal Hussars and served in India and Africa.
Several years ago he presented Sudbury Museum with many articles of warfare procured from the natives on the river Gambia. He died from gout aged 35 years.

September 26th 1855.

To be sold at Stanstead near Melford-assortment of farm implements, carriages etc, the property of Isaac Snell of Hartest and Richard Bird, late carriers to Sudbury and Bury.

September 26th 1855.

To be sold at Britons Farm at Somerton near Hartest, live and dead stock of Henry King who is leaving his farm. 3 horses-implements-3 cows.

September 26th 1855.

The fall of Sebastopol is reported.

September 26th 1855.

Cricket
---Clare v Haverhill. Clare-Perry 6-2---Last 2-0-Brasher-0-5-Ellingham-5-11---Deeks-0-3-Downs-19-4-Death-0-3-Gridley 3-1--- Mortlock 15-1-A. Perry1-1.
Haverhill-Basham 1-11- Fairweather-6-2-Knapp-2-18-Elles-1-0-Turner-1-8-Blanden-0-3-Gallafent-1-0-Hall-0-3-Packham-2-3-Carte-6-1---Hobbs 0-0.
Clare won by 7 runs.

September 26th 1855.

Margaret Catchpole. Mrs Ribey, formerly Margaret Catchpole, the story of whom the Rev Cobbold has written, has died at her residence in Newtown, Sidney, Australia.

September 26th 1855.

George Jackaman was committed for trial on a charge of shooting with intent to murder J. Cook, gamekeeper to Mr J.Garrad at Bures. Cook is going on favourably.

September 26th 1855.

Inquest on James Evered who while thatching a tall oat stack at the Parsonage Farm at Melford, fell down, head first on to the ground, he died on Thursday from concussion of the spine.

September 26th 1855.

Inquest at Barningham on Stephen Scarfe aged 49 who on Saturday night sat down to a harvest supper at the Royal George Inn when on his first mouthful he appeared to choke. Mr Morgan, surgeon from Hopton produced a large piece of unmasticated boiled beef which caused him to suffocate.

October 10th 1855

At a meeting of the Sudbury Corporation tenders were received for the erection of a new bridge called Croft bridge. Mr Bean's tender was 102L with brick ends and 93L with oak ends-Mr Webb with 65L and Mr Elliston with 87L, the tender of Mr Webb's was accepted.

October 10th 1855.

The bronze medal of the Royal Humane Society has been awarded to Charles Goody, a scholar at the British School at Bures in Suffolk for rescuing another boy from drowning in the river Stour at Bures, in August last year although only 12 years old, this lad has saved two lives in a space of 6 months.

October 10th 1855.

Lomas Smith, one of the Gypsy fraternity, described as a tinker was charged with stealing a silver watch and a steel chain and two brass keys the property of James Randall of Charsfield, the prosecutor is a farmer at Charsfield, it was on the 4th of August, on the tenpin ground at the Horse and Shoes public house and Randall was much intoxicated when the prisoner stepped up to him and proceeded to button up his coat, saying he was afraid he would catch cold in the stomach, he was observed to fumble in the prosecutors pocket, a man named Curtis went up as soon as he quitted and saw the watch and chain were missing, Leach also watched the prisoner and had seen him go towards the fence where the property was later found, the prisoner was given into the custody of the parish constable but managed to escape, he was eventually secured.
1 year imprisonment.

October 10th 1855

Messrs Isaacson and Tattersall have received instructions from the executors of the Samuel Vial gent., to sell by auction on the premises at Foxearth,(Lower Hall) on Friday the 12th of October the live and dead stock comprising 12 capital Suffolk Horses (chestnut mares and geldings) from 4 to 8 years-clever pony in harness- 12 handsome yearling heifers- 73 half bred Leicester lambs-3 yearling colts and fillies-Alderney milch cow in profit-20 fine shoats-7 waggons- 6 tumbrils nearly new. Excellent agricultural equipment for 500 acres- capital stationery threshing machine with 8 hp Hornsby steam engine- timber jim and well seasoned wheelwrights stuff.

October 31st 1855.

Married at Bulmer
---on the 23rd inst, the Rev J.Picton, curate of Bulmer to Anna, daughter of Mr D David Badham of Bulmer. October 31st 1855.

Soldier's letter from the Crimea.

Dear Father and Mother,
you will have heard long before this letter reaches you of the fall of Sebastopol, it was not taken without heavy fighting, we lost 180 fellows of my own regiment, thank God I escaped alright.
Sebastopol was once a splendid place but with shot and shell it is now a mass of ruins. Talk of the batteries, the great Redan was the place, it had places where they lived where neither shot nor shell could touch them and places where tailors and snobs work, we are looking for great news soon as they will fight or drown, we are all dressed ragged in Russian garments.

Corporal Mills, (Acton)

November 7th 1855

Sudbury Agricultural Association held it's 8th show at the Wood Hall estate, there were 47 ploughs. Champion ploughman was Joshua Lingley for Mrs Warren with a prize of 2L. Horsemen with long service-J.Cranfield with 41 years with H.H.Baker and John Piper with 30 years at Richard Aldham of Foxearth Hall.

November 7th 1855.

On Saturday night, the 27th inst, four bullocks were taken out of a meadow in Bildeston belonging to Mr Chinery of Nedging and four others from a field of Mr Rayham of Chelsworth and were driven next morning to the Angel Inn at Sudbury by a notorious character named Joseph Bumstead of Bildeston.
At the Inn he represented that they belonged to him and imitated an Irish dialect and said he had ordered his man to drive them to Halstead Fair on Monday morning, having ordered some hay he repaired indoors to refresh himself, taking a bottle of wine with his dinner, not having any money the landlord, Mr Manby , had his suspicions aroused and he communicated with p.c. Cross, in answer to the officer, Bumpstead said that he bought four bullocks at Cambridge and the other four elsewhere but the contradictions induced Cross to take him into custody. T
he next day the bullocks were identified and he was committed for trial.
He offered nothing in his defence and appeared to enjoy his spree in Sudbury.

November 14th 1855.

Mr J.D.Piper of Colne Engaine in Essex published his balance sheet of his 10th year of growing wheat after wheat without ploughing or digging.
Expences-Rent 40s-Tithe 7s---Rates 3s---Hoeing 35s Sowing 10s-Seed 6s 6d---Threshing 16s-Reaping or mowing 9s-Manure 40s. Total 8 7s 4d. ------ Receipts.-9 sacks of wheat at 33s- 14 17s ---Straw 50s-Total 17 7s 4d. Showing a profit of 8 19s 8d per acre.
Average profit for the last 6 years---6 19s 10d on ground not calculated to grow wheat but inclined to grow thistles, twitch, cat's tails, black grass. Average produce having been 9s 2d per acre.

November 14th 1855.

To be sold by private contract at Otten Belchamp. All that newly built well accustomed Freehold Inn known as the Green Man-well suited for trade, doing business of 200 coombs annually, coming in about 400. Also six freehold cottages nearly adjoining, the whole producing a rental of 59. For particulars, apply to Blunden and Squire at Melford and Sudbury.

November 21st 1855

The corpse of an unfortunate girl, Ellen Heard was recovered from the river nearly opposite the Union. It appears that the employment at which she had been engaged was very distasteful to her and she had had several altercations with her master.
Found Drowned.

November 28th 1855.

Married on the 22nd inst at St George's Hanover Square by the Rev Charles Eyre, rector of Gt Melton, Norfolk. Captain William Hyde Parker, son of the late Vice Admiral Hyde Parker and A.D.C. to Major General Eden, commanding Western District, to Sophia Mary, the second daughter of Mr Nathaniel Clarke Barnardiston of the Ryes, Henny, near Sudbury.

December 12th 1855.

James Prior aged 13 was charged with setting fire to two barns-two sheds-hay stack and stables at Gt Sampford.
Acquitted,
his Lordship said he did not think he intended to set fire to the property but ought to have a good whipping.