The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1850 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive


The news in Britain

January 2nd 1850

On Christmas day the inmates of Sudbury Union were regaled with a good dinner of beef and plum pudding also plenty of plum pudding for supper, the men received 1 quart of beer and the women and the boys had 1 pint each of which they were highly gratified.
It is gratifying that since improvements have been completed that there was little or none of the riotous disgraceful conduct that was previously shown.

January 2nd 1850

Sudbury Corn Market. Wheat to 40s 6d per quarter (36 stone)-Barley to 26s 9d per quarter (32 stone)

January 13th 1850

James Theobald of Gt Waldingfield pleaded guilty to having on Oct 31st broken into a barn at Lavenham and stolen therefrom 6 bushels of wheat the property of Mrs Sarah Miles. 7 years transportation. John Clarke , labourer of Glemsford for stealing a quantity of barley from his master Mr Charles Biff. 6 months hard labour

January 16th 1850

Henry Wendon aged 18 and Henry Dixey 19 were found guilty of entering the house of Henry Beales at Acton and stealing a loaf of bread and a piece of printed cotton. 6 months and a whipping.

January 16th 1850

James Theobald of Gt Waldingfield guilty of breaking into a barn at Lavenham and stealing 6 bushels of peas the property of Sarah Mills.
7 years transportation.

January 16th 1850

John Clarke of Glemsford for stealing a quantity of barley from his employer Charles Biff. 6 months hard labour.

January 16th 1850

On Tuesday evening the tenants of Col.Bence of Kentwell dined at the Bull Inn Melford. Mr Appleton the agent took the chair and the health of Col.Bence was drunk and that of Aaron Ostler the oldest tenant on the estate. Mr Ostler returned the thanks and concluded with a toast " plough and flail fleece and sail may landlords flourish and tenants never fail".

January 23rd 1850

In the surrounding district an enormous amount of straw plaiting is carried on there is scarcely a cottage in the district where it is not exercised. Until this last 3 months trade has been slack but there is now a growing demand for it, many merchants from Luton I am informed are in the habit of coming to Castle Hedingham to purchase the straw plait. The best kind of makers get 3s 6d a score and a good hand can make a score and a half a week, for inferior kind of work pay varies from 3d to 10d and 1s a score. The earnings of children and girls may be taken as 3d to 6d a day, these are employed on coarser work, the straw is usually purchased from a local farmer at 6d a bundle which being in quantity as much as a person can carry. The rate of pay for a farm labourer in this district is wretchedly low 6s to 7s a week and were it not for straw plaiting they would be in the worst possible position than now. When plaiting is depressed a considerable amount of work is done for the cheap tailors of Colchester and London who send the different articles to Castle Hedingham and other places in the district to have them made up.

January 30th 1850

Jeramiah Sparrow a chimney sweep and Alfred Piper a silk worker were sent to prison for 1 year each for stealing a quantity of money from the house of Mrs Hemstead in Cross Street Sudbury.

January 30th 1850

We regret to hear that the Rev Mr Herringham, rector of Borley, met with a serious accident on Thursday last, as the Rev gentleman was walking in his hall his foot slipped and he fell, fracturing his leg, he was speedily attended by Mr Mason of Sudbury and is progressing favourably.

January 30th 1850

JUST PUBLISHED, price 2d----MAN STEALING by PROXY or the guilt of our countrymen in up holding the SLAVE TRADE by the purchasing of SLAVE GROWN PRODUCE by John Fitzgerald. The Lord Bishop of Ely is pleased to licence the Wesleyan Chapel at Long Melford for the celebration of Divine Service according to the rites of the Church of England.

January 30th 1850

The farmers around Bramford have recently been giving the labourers 9s a week but within the last few weeks a reduction of 1s has been made, Mr Mumford of Bramford announced a similar reduction, the labourers have expressed determination not to accept 8s a week and all struck, they went to Mr Henry Howard's farm at Sycamore House to induce his men to strike but not man or boy could be got. This movement is unusual and startling, we hear the labourers are of excellent character but are not prepared to submit to further reduction in wages.

January 30th 1850

It has been determined to abolish toll gates in the Chelmsford district, taking of tolls will cease to exist at Michaelmas, toll houses will be pulled down, the duty of road repairs will fall on Parishes

January 39th 1850

Coals at Sudbury yards are getting scarce in our coal yards from the long and continued frosts and the high floods which for the last two months nearly put a stop to navigation on our river, to these may be added the cheapness of the article which causes greater consumption from the neighbouring towns and villages the inhabitants of which used to send to Colchester or Bury for coals but since the opening of the railways they have come to Sudbury for them. The barges belonging to merchants do not suffice to bring sufficient quantities in the for increased demand and attempts were made to hire others downstream but without effect and so far navigation, instead of being injured as expected by the railway, the coal trade keeps increasing., they are now sent for from beyond Haverhill, upwards of 20 miles.

February 12th 1850

On Saturday last, a barn at Peacocks Hall Estate at Lt Cornard, 3 miles from Sudbury, was accidently set alight and speedily consumed in cosequence of the wind being strong and it standing on an isolated position. It is supposed a boy having lighted a fire nearby, a spark was carried by the wind onto the barn.

February 12th 1850

Died from consumption in her 40th year, Elizabeth, the wife of Charles Jones of Erbury Farm, Clare and daughter of the late Mr Garret of Pentlow Mill.

February 27th 1850

For sale at Glemsford-a Small Estate called Seldon Field Lands-32 acres also in the forenoon the household furniture of the late John Bigg.

March 6th 1850

The Sunday train from Sudbury has been discontinued to the gratification of the inhabitants, it was opened for the accommodation of the graziers in sending cattle and sheep to the Monday market. Being so near St Peter's Church and at the time of starting during the afternoon service and the noise and bustle and cruelties exercised on the poor beasts in getting them into trucks it was greatly annoying.

March 6th 1850

On Tuesday night, the house of Mr Thomas Chandler of St Pauls Hall, Belchamp in Essex was broken into by five persons and a quantity of pork, butter and money etc were stolen . On Thursday P.R.Cross and policemen Wright of Sudbury with Eldred and Butcher of the Essex police apprehended 4 of them and found part of the stolen property, their names are Josiah Bixby, Thomas Wright, William Goodwin alias Bonny and John East and on Friday, Cross succeeded in apprehending Charles Smith from Belchamp after a half an hours chase, he is a most dangerous character.

March 12th 1850

In consequence of the continued depreciation of agricultural produce, the farmers of Walter Belchamp in Essex have reduced the wages of agricultural labourers to 6s a week, some of them have refused to submit to the reduction but we understand they have resumed work.

March 12th 1850

On Friday night a daring robbery was committed at Mr John Firman's of Goldingham Hall, Bulmer in Essex. Some thieves effected entrance into the cellar by breaking down some brickwork and stealing wine from the cellar to the value of near 30.

March 19th 1850

As Mr Hinds of Denston Plummers Arms was proceeding home towards the village he perceived some rooks within shot, having his gun with him he drew it from under the seat when suddenly it went off in the direction of the horse's head and so near to it's destruction as to take about one inch off it's right ear.

March 19th 1850

On Thursday last, George Pryke a butcher from Denston slaughtered a Norfolk pig fatted by Mr Halliday of Chippenham to the enormous weight of 40 stone.

March 19th 1850

Joseph Beavis aged 80 years who was convicted in March of an unnatural offence and sentenced to death has been commuted to three years imprisonment.

March 26th 1850

The large and populous village of Wortham was last week seriously inconvenienced by a tumultuous rabble parading about demanding more wages by the farmers, on Monday some of them were brought before the Bench at Diss , the following were convicted, Benjamin Bush for inciting Mr Drake's men to strike, he was committed to Ipswich gaol as a rogue and a vagabond, 1 month hard labour. Thomas Dixon for assaulting John Cross, fined 2 with 11s 6d costs, David Copping for damaging Mr Ephraim's Drake's property. 1s with 15s 6d costs.

March 26th 1850

Inquest at Langham on George Harvey aged 11 who was keeping birds for his father when the gun refused to go off, he took a hold of it's by it's barrel and struck it on the ground when it went off inflicting wounds which caused great haemorrhage, he was conveyed home by a man working in the next field but died the next day. Accidental.

March 27th 1850

Two messuages with old established butcher's shop to be sold at the Crown Inn, Hartest, in occupation of Robert Turner, butcher and Thomas Jackson, carpenter.

March 27th 1850

For sale at Chaine Farm, Kentford, 3000 larch firs, may be viewed by application to Mr Ruse, tenant.

March 27th 1850

100 capital oak trees of large dimensions for sale on application to Mr Teverson, the Hall, Barnardiston, 3 months credit will be given

March 27th 1850

Paper Mills, Melford, to be sold or let. The above established estate consists of a family residence and manufactury which is fitted up with machinery for making paper, there is a fall of water of 7ft supplied by the streams of the Stour and Glemsford rivers. (Bush Boake Allen, G.H.)

March 26th 1850

The large and populous village of Wortham was last week seriously inconvenienced by a tumultuous rabble parading about demanding more wages by the farmers, on Monday some of them were brought before the Bench at Diss , the following were convicted, Benjamin Bush for inciting Mr Drake's men to strike, he was committed to Ipswich gaol as a rogue and a vagabond, 1 month hard labour. Thomas Dixon for assaulting John Cross, fined 2 with 11s 6d costs, David Copping for damaging Mr Ephraim's Drake's property. 1s with 15s 6d costs.

March 26th 1850

Inquest at Langham on George Harvey aged 11 who was keeping birds for his father when the gun refused to go off, he took a hold of it's by it's barrel and struck it on the ground when it went off inflicting wounds which caused great haemorrhage, he was conveyed home by a man working in the next field but died the next day. Accidental.

March 27th 1850

Two messuages with old established butcher's shop to be sold at the Crown Inn, Hartest, in occupation of Robert Turner, butcher and Thomas Jackson, carpenter.

March 27th 1850

For sale at Chaine Farm, Kentford, 3000 larch firs, may be viewed by application to Mr Ruse, tenant.

March 27th 1850

100 capital oak trees of large dimensions for sale on application to Mr Teverson, the Hall, Barnardiston, 3 months credit will be given

March 27th 1850

Paper Mills, Melford, to be sold or let. The above established estate consists of a family residence and manufactury which is fitted up with machinery for making paper, there is a fall of water of 7ft supplied by the streams of the Stour and Glemsford rivers. (Bush Boake Allen, G.H.)

April 3rd 1850

Yesterday at about 10 o'clock a dreadful case of stabbing took place on the Bulmer road about 1 mile from Sudbury.Two young men from Belchamp were on their return from Ballingdon accompanied by two young females when two other men named Piper from Ballingdon followed them, one of the Pipers had been aquainted with a young woman and on overtaking the Belchamp men a scuffle broke out and both the Pipers were stabbed, one in the abdomen the other in various parts of the body, the latter is not considered in danger but the other is, as part of the bowels have protruded through the wall of his stomach. Three men who reside in Otten Belchamp were arrested on suspicion, their names are Edgitt, Howard and Ginn.

April 10th 1850

On Tuesday last, mortification having taken place in the case of Charles Piper, Dr.Skirmshire and Mr Mason, surgeon, gave it their opinion that he would in all probability be dead in a few hours; Supt.Hoy, therefore by the direction of N.C.Barnidiston and D.Badham Esqrs.conveyed the three prisoners to bed room of the dying man, immediately on seeing Ager, Charles Piper exclaimed " that's the man", and his deposition was taken as follows; on Saturday the 30th of March, I was in the White Horse Inn in Ballingdon in company with several persons, we remained drinking to nearly 12 o'clock when the house was cleared, I and several others and my brother William Piper walked out of Ballingdon towards Bulmer. There were five girls amongst us, when we got to the bottom of Kitchen Hill, I put my arm round the waist of one of them. One of the men (who I knew by sight but not by name) said I should not go any further with the girl; I said I would. Directly after that I felt blood running down my side and my leg and fell on the footpath. The two other men went away and left me and I was led home by George Golding. The prisoner, John Ager, is the same man who told me not to go any further with the girl. Ager was remanded until Tuesday next, the other prisoners were discharged.
On Tuesday morning the inquest was held on the body of Charles Piper at the King's Head Inn, Ballingdon, by Mr William Dowman, Coroner, Mr J.Gooday appeared for the father of the deceased. James Downs, labourer of Ballingdon, said I was in the club room at the White Horse Inn on the night of the 30th of March, there were about twenty persons present.
Charles Piper came into the room about eleven o'clock, he was sober.
Elliston, I and Charles Piper with Charles Constable drank together, we had two pints of beer between four of us. John Ager, Robert Howard and Henry Ginn came into the room together at about twenty minutes before twelve. Kezia Chinery and three or four girls were in the room before John Ager came in. Emma Cranfield was there and I saw Charles Piper speak to her. John Ager appeared sober; he had one quart of beer with Robert Howard and Henry Ginn. About quarter to twelve we left and I saw John Ager, Robert Howard, Henry Ginn, Emma Cranfield, Maria Smith, James Golding, George Golding, Charles Piper and William Piper in the street.
They all walked up the Bulmer road and I followed them, about a rod behind. It was a moonlight night but rather cloudy. I saw Charles Piper walking with Emma Cranfield, he had his arm over her shoulder. John Ager was also walking with her and had hold of her arm.
They went up Bulmer Kitchen Hill some distance.The other men had hold of the other girls.When they were going down the next hill, I heard John Ager say to deceased," Charles Piper, you shan't go but a d----d little further". Charles Piper asked for why as he had as much right to the girl as him. John Ager then turned round and made a poke or butt with his right arm at the lower part of his body, he then made a second poke at him but I did not see what he had in his hand. Charles Piper stepped back and fell on the footpath and called out," oh my body, I have got a pain within me", he said nothing more. John Ager then said to George Golding," I can fight", he then bent his fists and went to him in a fighting attitude, George Golding ran away and John Ager followed him but did not get near enough to strike him. Charles Piper kept calling out " oh my body", shortly after William Piper came up and said to his brother " what is amiss", John Ager said," we will b----soon let you know, we will serve you worse than than we did your brother", John Ager then made a push at William Piper, at the lower part of his stomach. Piper stepped back and John Ager ran up to him and struck him in the thigh, I did not see anything in Ager's hand. James Golding led William Piper home. When John Ager ran up to William Piper, the latter said " I have got as much as I want, I am struck in the thigh". Ager made no reply but walked down the hill. When we had got a quarter a mile on the road I heard William Elliston say to John Ager " we want the knife you stabbed that young man with" Ager replied he had not got one, I then left them and they went on to Bulmer. William Piper, brother of the deceased deposed that his brother left the White Horse at about quarter before twelve with the girl Cranfield and another girl and George and James Golding. I was walking with William Elliston and two girls, Kezia and Sophia Chinery, up Bulmer road when I heard someone call out and ran to see what was the matter. When I got over Kitchen Hill I saw my brother laying in the path and John Ager standing nearby, John Downs, George and James Golding were standing nearby. I said what is the matter and Ager replied," I will b--- soon let you know, I will serve you worse than I have the other. John Ager then ran at me, it was moonlight, I saw a knife shining in his hand, he pointed the knife at my stomach, I went back about a yard and put my arm out to push him away but he cut my wrist. When I pushed him he went down on his knees and stabbed me in the thigh at the same thrust, I felt so ill that I laid down on the path near my brother and bled profusely. John Ager then ran away. My brother cried out " I have got much pain within me, I do not know what to do". James Golding then came and led me home. William Elliston, malster, said when I was getting near Bulmer Kitchen Gate, Edward Spalding met me and said that William Piper was stabbed by them Belchamp fellows. I then ran forward and when I got part down the hill beyond Bulmer Kitchen Gate I saw William Piper laying on the path surrounded by several persons, I could see he was bleeding from the thigh. I ran down the hill to Bulmer Street after them and overtook them just by the houses on Pinch Hill on the road to Belchamp.
There were three men and two women, I went up to John Ager, took hold of both of his arms asked for the knife he stabbed William Piper with. He said he had not got it. I saw him pass the knife to Emma Cranfield, while I had hold of both his arms, he touched the girl and she took it from him, I distinctly saw the knife handle as he passed it to the girl. When he said he had not got the knife, I said no you have just given it to the girl, I then took hold of the girl's arm and said to her " you have got it", she said" I have not".
I have reason to believe she had it in her pocket. I then asked them to all to come back and see William Piper, they refused. Anger said he had not done it. I then returned to where I had left William Piper laying but found he was gone. I overtook Charles Piper walking homewards to Ballingdon. This was on the top of the hill, nearly opposite Kitchen Farm Gate, he was walking slowly, I said to him " come on old mate", he said " I can't walk fast, for I feel so bad in my body". I passed him and went on to Ballingdon. When I got to an entry by Mr Hasell's bake office I saw William Piper standing in the entry. I asked him how he was, he said pointing to his thigh," just look here". I then left him and went home.
When I was on Pinch Hill attempting to get the knife from the girl, Ager came up to me so close that I was fearful of his intentions and knocked him down. Maurice Mason, surgeon, deposed; On Sunday morning last I was sent for to attend Charles Piper in Ballingdon. I found a wound about 3/4 of an inch long about 2 inches above the navel and inclining to the left side. It was a transverse wound and appeared to have been done with a pocket knife. A small part of the omontum was protruding from the wound which I returned to the body, then dressed the wound. He complained of great tenderness in the body. I applied leeches, formentations and blisters etc.; but he died on Wednesday evening, about nine o' clock. I attended him three or four times a day. I have since made a post mortem examination and am of the opinion that he died from the wound he received on Saturday night. Charles Constable, a labourer who left the house with Elliston said that he saw John Ager, young Howard and Ginn standing round Charles Piper who was laying on the ground. William Piper went up and asked what was amiss, then young Ager said " I will ---- soon let you know, I will serve you worse than I did the other". He then made a thrust at Piper, aiming at his body but Piper drew back and Ager stumbled as he ran at him and went down on his knees and stabbed him in the hip, his wrist was cut at the same time. I saw the blade of the knife in Ager's hand. Ager stopped a minute then went away.
Edward Spalding a groom of Bulmer said he left the White Horse with John Turner. He had got a little way up Sandy road when he heard a disturbance and ran back and beyond the Kitchen Gate saw William Piper laying in the road alone. I went up to him and asked him what was the matter, he said someone had run a knife into him. I ran back to Ballingdon and met William Elliston and he and I went after the party from Belchamp and overtook them beyond the top of Pinch Hill. I heard one of them say in answer to a question from Elliston," I have not got a knife about me".
Elliston then took hold of the person and knocked him down and asked one of the women what she had got in her gown. She said" nothing", I saw her put something in her pocket but do not know what it was.
Emma Cranfield of Otten Belchamp, said I am 15 years old. I was at the White Horse Inn, Ballingdon, with Kezia Chinery from between 5 and 6 until about quarter before twelve. Sophia Chinery, Maria Smith, John Ager, Howard and Ginn. Maria Smith and myself were the first to go home. Ager, Howard and Ginn overtook us. When we had gone a little way on the Bulmer road six other young men overtook us and wanted to go home with us but we refused. They continued to follow us as far as beyond the gate at the top of the hill. Some of the young men who followed wanted to pull me away from the party. I was with Ager and had hold of his arm. Charles Piper put his arm on my shoulder but it was without my consent. I told Piper to be still but he would not and Ager told him not to interfere.
They kept walking with me half way down the hill. Charles Piper let me go first. I walked fond so did I. Maria Smith, aged 16, of Otten Belchamp, and another witness were then examined but nothing new was elicited.
The Coroner shortly after summed up and the Jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against John Ager.
On Sunday afternoon a very impressive discourse was preached at All Saints Church by the Rev Charles Badham on the melancholy death by the stabbing of Charles Piper in the Bulmer road; shewing the danger and solemnly warning the young men of his flock of the necessity of avoiding bad company which had been the means of bringing this young man to an untimely end.

April 24th 1850

A neat residence to let in the centre of the healthy rural village of Foxearth comprising entrance hall, commodious parlour, kitchen, sitting room, cellars, four airy sleeping compartments.
Stables and chaise house. Attractive and excellent gardens.
The above is a pleasant situation and within three miles of the capital market town of Sudbury with a railway station from whence there are trains to London four or five times a day. Apply Blunden and Rolfe, Sudbury.

April 24th 1850

To be let in Foxearth near Sudbury, neat cottage residence situated in the centre of this healthy rural village, comprising entrance hall- parlour-kitchen-store room-cellar and four roomy apartments, within three miles of Sudbury.

April 24th 1850

The annual meeting of the Society for the Promotion of Christianity among Jews took place in the concert room, Bury, on Monday.

April 24th 1850

An event of painful character occurred at Stradbroke on April 17th. John Botwright, late overseer and surveyor was having to appear before the Auditor to produce vouchers of the balance paid to his successor and being unable to do so put a period to his life by shooting himself.

April 24th 1850

The monotony of Melford village life was enlivened by the meeting of the Stoke and Melford Union Association on Monday.

April 24th 1850

On Wednesday night a daring robbery was committed at the house of Mr Ridgewell a farmer of Wickham St Pauls. Mr Ridgewell and Mrs Ridgewell slept in different rooms, because of Mrs Ridgewell's illness she slept in one of the lower rooms which into this the burglars affected their entrance and breaking open a desk containing 100 in promissory notes and several other notes, fortunately these were not noticed by the burglars, to prevent the old lady giving the alarm they gagged her with a rag but the alarm was given and a maid servant got up with Mr Ridgewell, the maid without dressing herself and in a heroic manner ran across two or three fields to give the alarm to some men working there and they went with her to the house, one of them opened the door and was struck on the arm by one of the thieves with a sharp instrument and inflicted severe wounds, the villains then made off.

April 24th 1850

At Sudbury Quarter Sessions, John Cooper of Gt. Cornard and James Hill of Gt. Cornard were charged with stealing a quantity of chaff from the Eastern Union Railway in which Company Hill was a driver. Cooper 6 months hard labour and Hill 7 days and to be whipped.

May 1st 1850

John Ager and Emma Cranfield were committed for trial on the charge of manslaughter.

May 29th 1850

A diabolical occurrence took place at Melford Fair on the return of a horse dealing party from the fair, four men were returning with a horse each and were descending Stansfield hill having first compelled a labouring man to escape their vengeance by a hasty retreat across the fields, a few women were so alarmed and a woman far advanced in pregnancy as to endanger her life. We are sorry to say that the most prominent place of this commanding place on Melford Green was occupied by an encampment of gipsies.

June 25th 1850

Died at Glemsford in his 28th year of consumption, William Butcher of Shimpling Mill.

June 26th 1850

On Tuesday last a singular instance of rat catching took place in the thatched barn in the occupation of John Firmin at Goldingham Hall, Bulmer, where a man without assistance of a dog or ferret or other means, captured in a short space of one hour twenty five minutes 106 full grown rats besides many smaller ones which he desposited in a mash tub and allowed Mr Firmin's dog to go into the tub and it killed about 50 very quickly the remainder were killed by the rat catcher's dog. The rat catcher is a man from Witnesham by the name of Joseph Poole, his father is aged 98 and follows the same occupation and expects this year to engage in the harvest as before.

July 2nd 1850

At a meeting of Essex magistrates at Sudbury Union House, a man from Borley named Deaves was committed to for trial at Chelmsford for stealing a watch from a man who lost it 4 months ago, it appears the prisoner was the first person seen near the spot where the watch was supposed to have been lost and was applied to in order to ascertain whether he found it or not, he denied finding it but afterwards exchanged the watch with a sow for a horse with a man named Upson of Acton by whom it was carried to a watchmaker to have it repaired, the watch was well known to the watchmaker and information was given and Deaves apprehended.

July 7th 1850

A sad accident occurred at Bridge Street, Melford on Thursday last. A young lad named Henry Whent was climbing a tree for the purpose of rook scaring having a pistol in his hand, it went off shattering his hand and other parts of the contents lodged in his thigh.
After examination by Mr R.E.Jones the arm was amputated.

July 9th 1850

On Monday afternoon, Charles Bigg, a respectable farmer of Stanstead was found dead in his barn having hung himself.

July 9th 1850

Wheat Midget-We regret to find this destructive insect in it's lava or maggot stage has been found in the neighbourhood, a number of kernels are filled with these little orange maggots.

July 9th 1850

Cricket-Aubries at Bulmer in Essex v Chelmsford and Essex on the Chelmsford ground. 1st innings of the Aubries-168. Essex-25. 2nd innings, Aubries- 79 and Essex 45. Melford v Brundon---Melford innings 89 and 33---Brundon 23 and 33.

July 21st 1850

On Tuesday morning a fire occurred at Gt Waldingfield and burnt down three cottages and a beer-house the property of Thomas Hills of Waldigfield, the origin was from children playing with lucifer matches in a hovel.

July 23rd 1850

Death on the 16th, Robert Armstrong of the King William Inn at Lawshall.

July 23rd 1850

Although the weather was unfavourable more than 300 agriculturists and labourers met at Gt Wratting Hall on Saturday last to witness a match (made by the masters) between 12 ploughmen (three on each side from one family) in the constant employ of Mr Henry Pearce of Gt Thurlow and Mr Charles Deeks of Hundon, (to draw a furrow each of 80 yards in length) when after some exciting specimens on both sides Mr Pearce's men obtained a narrow victory. One of Mr Pearce's men when his furrow was stuck varied only one inch. A numerous party was afterwards partook of at Mr Goodchild's house.

July 23rd 1850

At Alpheton school fete on the 19th the children of the Sunday and day school were regaled with tea and cakes by the Rev Aislable, it was joyous to to witness so many happy countenances, after rustic sports they returned home with grateful hearts.

July 24th 1850

At Chelmsford Assizes, John Ager who was charged with the wilful murder of Charles Piper was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to be transported for life. The charge against Emma Cranfield was abandoned.
In the 1851 census there was an Ann Ager a 57 year old widow in Belchamp Otten and living with her 17 year old son Samuel Ager. William Howard was a 20 year old labourer, William Ginn was a 23 year old labourer.
(G.H.)
.

July 24th 1850

A serious accident occurred at Belchamp St Pauls to a man named Butcher, he was leaving Mr Unwin's mill at Belchamp St Pauls when a sail struck him on the head. He is expected to recover.

July 24th 1850

Capital small farm known as " Bowles" situated in Ridgewell. Farmhouse, barns, nags and cart stables, granary, cow house, piggeries, malting office, 16 comb steep with malt and barley chambers, malsters cottage and two detached cottages, 90 acres.

July 24th 1850

Cricket-Sudbury v Cockfield on Cockfield Green.
Cockfield 110 and 63-Sudbury 84 and 22. Melford v St Edmunds-Melford 25 and 29 St Edmunds 140. Wickhambrook v Bury St Edmunds. Bury 89-Wickham brook 23 and 24. Clare singles v Clare married-singles 68 and 52 married 54 and 19.

July 31st 1850

A disgraceful scene occurred at St Mary's church in Bury, a man named George Cooper presented himself at 8 am for marriage in such a state of intoxication the Curate the Rev Bearyman was unable to proceed with the service and deferred it until 10am with the hope that the man might somewhat recover, at that hour the incumbent proceeded with difficulty throughout the service till he came to the words of the intended, (with this ring I thee wed), the man refused to proceed any further and left the church, free from the marriage knot which we trust will be a happy escape for the intended wife.

July 31st 1850

Committed to Bury gaol---Thomas Smith charged with stealing two half pennies the property of Thomas Waring, surgeon of Cavendish.

July 31st 1850

Bowles farm at Ridgewell for sale-90 acres or more.

July 31st 1850

To be let at Michaelmas-Hill House near Kentwell Hall Avenue, Melford. Containing drawing room-breakfast room-butler's pantry-6 bedrooms-servants room-coach house-outbuildings-coach house-stable -detached cottage-walled garden. Apply to the owner, Mr Almack

July 31st 1850

Sale of live and dead stock, property of George Scott who is retiring- Dairy Suffolk cows-20 horses-fat bullocks-sheep-lambs-carriage and implements for 500 acres.

July 31st 1850

Died on the 22nd , much respected after a long affliction, Oliver Brand of Acton.

August 21st 1850

For sale at Clare-small estate known as "Trundles", about 50 acres, in occupation of Henry Dennis.

August 21st 1850

Caution to gleaners---At the County Petty Sessions, John Baker, a greengrocer was convicted in the sum of 20s for allowing his children to glean in a field not yet cleared, in a field belonging to Mr Browne at Fordham All Saints. Defendant was a reaper employed upon the ground and was found leaving the field with several bundles in his cart.

August 21st 1850

Cricket-Cavendish v Boxford on the ground at Cavendish belonging to Mr S.B.R.Brise at Blacklands. The Boxford gentlemen proved very unequally matched with their opposition. The excellent batting of Cavendish so protracted the game that the match was decided by the 1st innings. Cavendish-C.W.Mayde 36-5. Ambrose-0-1. R.Layton-13-56.
D.Hanbury-27-72. S.Brise-16-7. Rev Syer-6-20. Castley-10-0. T.Jardine-4- 14. J.Deeks-0-20. Bradman-3-6. A.Stammars-1-9. Boxford total 41.
Melford v Bury St Edmunds. Bury-60-22. Melford 50-35. Melford-Corder-2- 9. Cater-0-2. L.Green 17-3. Durrant-3-12. S.Worter-6. Spilling-3-0.
Gooch-2-2. Wright-6-9. H.Worters-2. Smith-0. A.Green-0.

August 24th 1850

At the County Court at Sudbury a case exercised attention was that of Rosbrook v Marshall. it was for the recovery of £ 10 lent by the plaintiff who has been in the service of General Addison for 12 years at Chilton Lodge. Defendant is a bricklayer and widower he had paid addresses to was the plaintiff who no doubt expected to be made the wife of defendant and lent him £ 10 which was not only not paid but was basely left in the family way by defendant. Damages £ 10 and £ 2 costs.

August 28th 1850

Mr Circuit, a farmer of East Ham has at the time, upwards of 600 people, men, boys and women employed in the pulling, carting and peeling onions for pickling, they will be engaged thus for two months, he pays wages of 200 a week, the cost of each acre of onions averages 100, this includes seed, weeding , gathering and peeling, last year he sowed near a ton of onion seed, the onions are pulled by the women by the rod and skinned by the gallon, he makes about 1500 payments a day as the people receive money 3-4 times a day.

September 4th 1850

Thomas Smith alias Collins, for robbery at Cavendish. Transported for 7 years . (Smith must have had previous convictions.( G H).

September 4th 1850

Died at an advanced age, Mr Elias Cleare, schoolmaster of Pebmarsh, Essex, a native of Sudbury and the father of John Cleare of the Castle Inn in Sudbury. During his long residence in Pebmarsh he gained the respect of all classes by his quiet demeanour and strict attention to his duties as village schoolmaster, he was a writer and poet and a humble Christian. His remains were followed by the school children and several farmers and tradesmen of the parish and other villages.

September 4th 1850

Alfred Bacon for stealing from the orchard of Mr William Baker of Brundon Hall, Sudbury. 3 months. He was accompanied by three men who made their escape by swimming the river which adjoins the orchard.

September 4th 1850

The following letter has been received from R. Pawsey a shoemaker, an intelligent and enterprising man who in October last emigrated from Lidgate.
Geelong, Port Philip. March 18th 1850.
I have taken four journeys into the bush, one of nine miles, one of six miles and one of fifty miles and my mind is impressed, the lands I saw are very good and the oxen I saw are finer and better formed than those in England. The sheep are smaller and the cattle are as fat as dough but water is very scarce for the people are too lazy to dig wells where I think much water could be obtained. There are some fine lakes of 7 to 20 miles in length, some are salt and some fresh, I never saw so much as one snake but we think no more of them than we would at Stansfield. Thousands of acres are of dead wood as much as live wood and lying on the ground, the timber is not good for building as that which is grown in a forest, the quantity of flies is truly wonderful but fires they are making are reducing them, they have fires of five or six miles in length. The people who live up here are a rough lot but kind hearted and a chance one a Christian. The persons who wish to become a famer ought to bring, say, 200 and wait till he get 10 acres or so to build his house and keep two cows and make all the butter he can, he can dig up one acre for wheat and all he can for vegetables and watch for an opportunity, I have no doubt in a very few years he would work wonders. Again if a man can bring 1000-2000 he could go up bush and buy a square mile and keep a good dairy and send good butter, cheese and young pigs to town he would be a thriving and independent man, there are a great many ways a man can start and do well. Sir, Do not let one single word that I have said induce you to come as I think the change would be too great for you, we have a few natives now in town but I never saw any in the bush, houses are very poor here compared to yours but they work very hard, I am living in a little house doing somewhat my own trade which at a full week I can earn 5s-6s a day. I like the country very well and if you would give me your four wheeler and a pair of Greys I would not come back. So we all wish you and your family well, your well wisher and sincere friend. R.Pawsey
. Mr Balls, farmer of Stansfield, Clare, Suffolk , England.

October 9th 1850

On Thursday last, James Balaam was committed to Springfield gaol for stealing a quantity of apples from Thomas Pung at Bulmer, Balaam has long been suspected of being concerned in the many depredations in gardens in the neighbourhood.

Qctober 16th 1850

On Wednesday night at about 10, a fire was discovered at Pentlow , which is about 5 miles from Sudbury, on the extensive premises of Mr John Chickall, (Ropers farm, G.H.) and the property of the Rev Mr Sperling, the dwelling house-barn-granary-stables-sheds- together with 2 stacks of hay-1 of wheat-1 of barley and straw stacks, were entirely destroyed. The parish engine was soon on the spot but by mismangement it could not be set to work until just before the Sudbury and Melford machines arrived. Their united exertions only availed to save one small barn, all other buildings falling prey to the flames. The property was insured .

October 23rd 1850

John Poole was charged with stealing one pocket handkerchief From Thomas Dixey at Cookes Circus in Sudbury. As he had been formerly convicted he was sentenced to 7 years transportation.

October 29th 1850

During Sunday night two good hoggets were stolen from a field of 40 belonging to Messrs Bird and Sheppard of Cowlinge, the skins were left in the field.

October 29th 1850

James Game and Golding Wright were found guilty of stealing two rabbits the property of Samuel Hills of Edwardstone. 7 years transportation.

October 29th 1850

Elizabeth, wife of Abraham Atkins of Glemsford , for stealing a quantity of dripping, tea and sugar from the Rev Coldham. 6 weeks.

October 30th 1850

Sarah Ambrose of Glemsford was found guilty of stealing 2 cotton stockings the property of Thomas Smith. 3 months.
Henry Cousins for stealing a quantity of barley sheaves from Thomas and John Hill of Little Waldingfield. 3 months.

October 30th 1850

The third annual show of the Sudbury Agricultural Society took place on a large field belonging to Mr Meekins of Woodhall close to the Bury entrance to the town. 46 ploughs took part, at three the prize winners received their rewards. Long service-Martha Ward £ 2 10s for 12 years with Richard Aldham of Foxearth Hall. Large family with no parish relief-Robert Steed with 11 children for Mr Meekings,£ 2 10s.
Wheel plough-William Deal for Rev Fearon. Charles Gibbons 3rd - £ 1 for Mrs Hurrell of Foxearth. 4th William Lee for Samuel Viall of Lower Hall Foxearth. £ 1 10s and silver tankard for best roots-George Mumford of Causton Hall Little Cornard. John Piper reared 203 lambs from 177 ewes for Richard Aldham of Foxearth Hall with the loss of 3 ewes,£ 1 10s.

November 12th 1850

On Wednesday last, as a boy named Lovick aged 9 years of Ixworth was employed at a threshing machine, he accidentally fell in the drum, on being released he was conveyed to hospital where it was found he had severe injuries with his limb completely crushed and his foot hanging on by the tendons, his thigh was also broken, he is so far recovered as to enable having his thigh amputated and is doing extremely well.

December 2nd 1850

On Saturday a child who's parents reside in Killboy Lane, Sudbury had a narrow escape from death by fire, the child ran into the lane with its clothes on fire where two men were working and they extinguished the flames.

December 2nd 1850

On Sunday week the cottage residence of Mr Ferguson who is land steward for Caledon Alexander of the Aubries, Bulmer, was broken into while the family were at church and 4 pounds were stolen.

December 4th 1850

Sudbury Market-A large supply of wheat met a dull trade-Wheat to 41s 6d-Barley to 23 6d.per quarter.

December 4th 1850

Inquest at Gt Cornard 5 Bells before Mr Harry Wayman, Coroner, on the body of John Polley aged 58 and landlord of the Inn. From the evidence of William Hunt, a son in law, deceased had been drinking and had been poorly for some time, about 6 in the evening he was sent for by his wife to go to her, at about 9 he went to the bedroom and found Mr Polley had just died. Emily Polley, daughter of deceased said she waited on her father on that Thursday, he again went to bed about a quarter an hour before she got up at 1 o'clock, she had taken him some mashed mutton but he ate very little, she visited him several times and at 8-30 she took him up some gruel and saw his eyes turn up, she called her sister, Mrs Hunt. Eliaza Hunt said she and her sister dined at 1 on suet pudding and cold mutton, she hashed some for her father, he took the gravy but no meat. Emily Polley said she ate the hash her father left and her sister had some. Adjourned. The stomach of the deceased with the saucepan in which the gruel was mixed was delivered to Mr Image for analysis who found a large quantity of arsenic in the stomach.

December 11th 1850

An inquest was held at the Five Bells Cornard on the body of the landlord, Mr John Polley aged 58. William Hunt deceased's son in law said that deceased was a great drinker and had been poorly for some time. Hunt had been sent for by his wife(daughter of deceased) and he went to the bedroom where Mr Polley had just died. Emily Polley, daughter, said her father was ill and she took him up some linseed gruel and mashed mutton, he ate nearly all of it and shortly afterwards turned up his eyes and died, she called her sister Mrs Hunt into the room. The inquest was adjourned and the stomach with the saucepan in which the gruel was mixed were sent to Mr Image for analysis. A large quantity of arsenic was found in the stomach.

December 11th 1850

The house of Mr Hurrel of Middleton was entered by burglars as early as 8-30 in the evening. They ransacked the house and went upstairs to the housekeeper's room and struck her although she is an elderly lady, she screamed murder and Mr Hurrel met them on the landing where they committed a brutal attack on him during the scuffle Mr Hurrel managed to bite one of the party, one of the party said I will have no more of this and they decamped. Mr Hurrel followed them to the road and gave the alarm to a family nearly opposite, the Rev. O.Raymond was not at home but the ladies rang the alarm bell which brought some villagers to their assistance. Information was given to the police who proceeded to the house where they found a cap and handkerchief, on their return to Ballingdon they saw John East and Charles Smith coming from a house and took them into custody. On Smith they found a document which was identified the next day by Mr Hurrel also a knife which fitted the marks on the the window where they had broken into the house. Next day William Cranfield of Otten Belchamp was arrested by our gaoler Mr Cross and it was found the marks on his thumb where Mr Hurrel had bitten him.
The following day John Martin of Belchamp St Pauls was arrested and a pocket piece struck in the memory of the Duke of York was upon him. They were remanded at Hedingham until next March.

December 11th 1850

Sudbury Market--Prime beef to be sold by auction on the 12th of December at 3 in the afternoon. A superior Galloway Scot weighing upwards of 100 stone and 14 handsome Scots averaging 60 stone and upwards. The above are from the yard of Mr C.Underwood of Acton Hall whose excellent feeding and management of fat stock is generally acknowledged. The large bullock has been fed on cake since April 1849.
The whole will therefore be well worthy of attention of those looking for first rate Xmas beef.

December 18th 1850

Removed this day (Tuesday) from Bury Gaol, James Poole of Sudbury, 14 years transportation, James Game and Golding Wright for felony at Edwardstone. 7 years transportation.

December 23rd 1850

At Glemsford on Thursday last some men employed in raising stone in a field in occupation of Corbin Morley near Glemsford Bridge found the bones of two human bodies at two feet below the surface, a short distance from the hedge.

December 28th 1850

At Glemsford on Thursday last some men employed in raising stone in field in occupation of Mr Corben Morley near Glemsford Bridge found the bones of two bodies two feet below the surface near the hedge.

January 8th 1851

Letters to the Editor.

Dear Sir,
Re skeletons found near Glemsford County bridge. I have visited the spot several times.the skeletons were a male amd young female, they ranged side by side, the male on the right side with no vestige of a coffin.

Many think there must have been foul work but from their position east to west which imply's it was a Christian burial which is confirmed by two sticks laid across them. It might have been a " strangers corner" on a former burial ground as tradition says there was an ancient site of a monastery in that field.
Old men say when ploughing within a half century or not much more they have felt the plough jump over foundations.
There is also a spring, a 100 yards away from the spring there is strong and unfailing sweet water and cold as well known in this locality as " Holy Water" and frequently the thirsty labourer will go half way across the field for draughts of this cold sweet water from this spring.
There is more evidence that the men struck the foundations of a wall 6-7 feet high from the surface, the stones appear about 4lbs in weight and of regular size.

Two coins have been found, the supposition is that anyone buried would have been furnished with a St Peters fee actually put in the hand for admission to heaven and to pay St Peter as he is supposed to hold the key to heaven. The first coin is a penny piece of the reign of Henry the 3rd who reigned from 1216 till 1272. The second which is a silver two penny piece from the reign of Charles 1st who reigned from 1625 to 1649. A copper token was found of Thomas Reynolds of the Star Inn and Huckster.

W.Boutell.

March 5th 1851

John Martin, Walter Cranfield, John Gust and Charles Smith were found guilty of breaking into the house of Mr Hurrel at Middleton, Sudbury, where they beat the servant on the head with a bludgeon. 7 years transportation each.
In the 1851 census there was an William Hurrel aged 68 a bachelor farming Gatehouse farm and employing 9 men and 2 boys. Martha Brabrook was his 78 year old servant.(G.H.).