The Foxearth and District Local History Society
1842-1843 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive

January 5th 1842

Sudbury Union---wanted Chaplain.salary £ 50 per annum.

January 11th 1842

Daniel Heartley, labourer of Glemsford was indicted for stealing 12 herrings from the cart of Peter Golding a carrier from Glemsford who said he was coming home from Sudbury on the 18th of December with 50 herrings in his basket, they were undisturbed at the bottom of Hay Hill and as I was coming up the hill the prisoner overtook me and spoke to me, he was was some way up the hill, behind the cart. The prisoner said the prosecutor's Dickie fell down a time of two and with the help of two women he pushed up behind by putting his shoulder to the wheel. His master, Mr Rose gave him a good character. Not guilty.

January 11th 1842

George Oakley of Glemsford was found guilty of stealing 6 bushels of turnips from James Heckford of Glemsford, he having been convicted before of felony at Chelmsford Assizes and transported for 7 years was again sent for 7 years transportation.

January 25th 1842

A landrail or corncrake, a very unusual bird to be killed in the winter was shot by Rigby Mason on the lands of Drumalford (Galloway) on the 10th.

January 25th 1842

The following is the the official returns of the average price of corn per bushel for the Tithe rent charge over the last 3 years. Wheat, 7s 3© d-Barley, 4s 2d-Oats, 2s 11© d.

January 25th 1842

On Thurday night last, two fine fat sheep were stolen from William Jennings of Rodbridge farm at Melford, it appears the skins and offal were found on an adjoining field leading to Sudbury, they were well slaughtered. Mr Jennings's acts of kindness in alleviating the distress of the poor deserves a better return.

February 1st 1842

Lavenham fair is expected to be well attended on Shrove Tuesday, it is anticipated that a great number of army horse contractors who were liberal purchasers at some of the late fairs last year for the Continent will be here and create interest in light nags for suitable for exportation.

February 8th 1842

Committed to Bury gaol--William Lingley, Thomas Simpson and John Belchamp charged with at night time stealing two sheep from Glemsford the property of Patrick Ostler of Melford.
March 22nd 1842. The above were sentenced to 15 years transportation.

February 8th 1842

On Thursday evening as Mr Bear, a farmer from Gestingthorpe was returning from Sudbury market, he was stopped on the road about quarter of a mile out of Sudbury by three men who took his hat and after a short scuffle left him. A man named Stow was taken up but there was no proof of guilt and he was released.

February 22nd 1842

An extraordinary hare hunt took place on Tuesday last when Mr Cawston's Harriers and a few gentlemen met at Glemsford Mill, they drew Bradfield wood at Pentlow where they found a hare, it ran to Borley wood, through Borley parish to Brundon Mill. Puss then turned towards Sudbury and crossed the river continuing full stretch on the Sudbury side of the river, crossing Rodbridge road near the turnpike into Melford meadows, she then crossed again into Essex opposite the residence of Mr Wallace at Liston, the horsemen had been obliged to return to Rodbridge to cross the river. After crossing into Liston she took a course through Liston park then onto Liston Gardens where she crossed the river again to Suffolk onto Mr Bigg's land at Glemsford where she was lost after a two hour run.

February 22nd 1842

There was a lamentable occurrence at Bulmer on Saturday night last. Mr Charles Viall a farmer was spending an evening in the Plough Inn at Bulmer and one of his workmen quarrelled with him and blows were struck, at 11 he went home in a state of excitement and quarrelled with his wife, she ran into another room and held the door, Mr Viall fired a gun laoded with shot through the door and part of the charge entered his wife's left breast, she made her escape to a cottage on the Halstead road and obtained assistance of two men who returned with her to the house where they found Mr Viall in bed with the gun. Mrs Viall's wounds were dressed but she is still not out of danger.

March 1st 1842

Inqu--at Clare on Betsy Twitchett, aged 8 years, who while sitting with her back to the fire her clothes caught light and she was dreafully burned. Her parents dressed the burn with oil, pork lard and egg. Mr Crown, surgeon said that if she had medical aid she would have survived.

March 8th 1842

Two boys, Alfred Green and Robert Cocksedge, the oldest not above 12 years were charged with using a snare to take game at Hesset, the boys who were bird keepers were seen to take a rabbit out of a snare and set it again. After the case was heard and the fine fixed it appears both boys were beaten by the keepers who said the magistrates would not convict if they were beaten. In cases like this it is best to beat the boys and let them go but not to punish them both ways.

April 19th 1842

Frances Howlett aged 19 and Mary Farrow of Ballingdon for stealing a pair of bellows, an iron saucepan and an ironsifter from Joseph Beard at Sudbury. Farrow 6 months, Howlett 7 years transportation.

April 19th 1842

Oak timber at Pentlow to be sold at Hogs farm in occupation of John Orbell.

April 26th 1842

Inqu--at Gt Waldingfield on Thomas Vince a farmer of Hole farm, aged 53, who shot himself. He has fretted about losses in his cattle.

April 26th 1842

Sudbury Election---The Observer States that a Bill will be introduced to publish the first case of exposing delinquency and we hear with satisfaction that the measures of disfrachisement will have the support of the Prime Minister.

May 3rd 1842

Inqu--at Sudbury on John Murrels an ostler at the Horn Inn. Charles Boby, said on the previous Saturday deceased and himself lifted a barrel of beer into a cart in the Horn Yard, they had to roll it up a ladder into a cart when deceased slipt and he fell backwards, the cask rolling on to his leg and fractured it, he thought the deceased was about 30 years old, he gradually sank and died last Wednesday evening.

May 11th 1842

Holgate---near Sudbury to be let. Comfortable newly built house containing 5 chambers-2 parlours-kitchen-small stable and gig house-pleasantly situated-large gareden of about 1© acres-situated about 1 mile from Sudbury by the side of the turnpike road-Bury-Norwich and London coaches pass daily. 30 or 40 acres of excellent meadow may be hired.

May 17th 1842

Her Majesty's revenue cruiser brought into Harwich harbour, the smack " Mayflower" of London with 60 half ankers of spirits and a crew of 4. She was captured off Aldborough, the men were committed.

May 17th 1842

Mr Redlington Rose at the House of Commons asked to bring leave to have Sudbury excluded from sending Burgesses to Parliament, his report says this Borough which has been notorious for a long time, that gentlemen of property have brought money for purposes to the poverty of the voters which is calculated they will be unable to withstand. According to 11 weavers who came to give evidence that there were some but very few were entitled to vote by inhabiting a house of 10 pounds rental but there 150 weavers on the register.

May 24th 1842

Died at Sudbury--Charles, son of Ambrose Sillitoe, aged 10 years of the Horn Inn at Sudbury, his illness was occasioned by fright at seeing the accident which lately caused the death of the ostler at the Horn Inn.

May 24th 1842

At the meeting of the West Suffolk Agricultural Association, the Rev Gwilt said Scotch farmers were very economical and English farmers would do well to follow their experience, the Scotch farmers are surprised at the amount of harness the English put on the horses and they made one horse do the work of three. Mr Gayforth said the Scotchmen did not always confine themselves to the truth. (much laughter).

May 24th 1842

To be sold at Waldingfield Rectory--40 dozen fine old wine. Vernold port of the first quality-gold coloured sherry-chapaign-bucellas- maderia-some very old rum which has been 40 years in the bottle.

June 28th 1842

Sudbury Disfranchisement Bill came under discussion in the House of Commons on Wednesday, the report was received.

July 4th 1842

Yesterday, notice of disfranchisement was served by a messenger from the Commons on the following Burgesses resident in this Borough-Francis Gooday-William Warner-Thomas Gooday-Charles Johnson- Charles King-James Brown-Thomas Brown-Francis Making-Samuel Shelley- Joseph Wheeler junior, the first three for giving the last three for receiving various sums of money at the last election.

July 11th 1842

Inqu--at Sudbury on John Chickall aged 42, an inmate at Sudbury Union House, he was subject to convulsive fits.

July 27th 1842

TO BE SOLD--AT GARRAWAY'S COFFEE HOUSE IN CHANGE ALLEY, CORN HILL.LONDON----Houghton Hall at Cavendish, Suffolk, on August 3rd 1842 at 12 o'clock--670 acres of productive land together with the Manor of Houghton, Impey and Bully Hall, a most compact extensive manor with excellent residence-gardens-pleasure grounds-warm farmyard-barn- stables-cow houses and bullock lodges-entrances etc-double tenement for labourers. 670 acres of meadow-pasture-arable and woodland and a value of about 600 pounds per annum. The estate is surrounded by excellent roads and is situated in Clare, Cavendish and Poslingford, 7 miles from Sudbury, 12 miles from Bury, 60 miles from London. The plans are at the Rose and Crown at Sudbury-the Bull Inn at Melford and the Angel at Bury and the property can be viewed on application to the tenants. By instructions from the mortgagees under the power of sale.

August 2nd 1842

Lusus Nature----A remarkable instance of this kind occurred a few days ago at Grays, Essex, when a woman named Avis was delivered of three children and a lamb which is now in possession of Mr Stedman, surgeon and is preserved in spirit.

August 2nd 1842

The Disfranchisement Bill for the Borough of Sudbury has been dropped for the present session.

August 17th 1842

Inqu--at Alpheton on William Stammers aged 29 years, a horsekeeper to the proprietors of the Phenomina Coach, deceased was standing at the heels of of one of the horses and hitting it with a stick when it kicked him, striking him in the stomach so severely that he died the next day. Accidental with a deodand of 1s.

September 6th 1942

There was a match of cricket played at Kedington between Kedington and Toppesfield clubs. The 1st innings terminated with a difference of 9 runs only, much interest was excited in the Kedington 2nd innings with displays of some exciting batting and remaining in until late with a long score and Toppesfield were obliged to give up the game. Kedington first innings--70 and in the 2nd innings 180 giving them 250 runs. Toppesfield, 1st innings 79 runs

September 13th 1842

On Friday night last, at about 11, a young man named John Blandon was found by Constable Palmer lying in Benton Street, Hadleigh in a pool of blood, he expired 5 minutes later. On examination by a doctor it appears he had been stabbed in the ribs. At the inquest it was stated deceased was an idle young man of about 20 years and was seen fighting and quarrelling with other young men who had left the Ram Inn. A baker named Henry Chiswell was ordered into custody.

September 13th 1842

Frances Howlett was removed from Bury gaol and put aboard the Garland Grove lying at Woolwich for transportation for 7 years.

September 13th 1842

As Mr Fletcher, the Governor of Bury Gaol was returning from London, having conveyed convicts to the Hulks, within 2 miles of Romford he saw Fosdyke, one of the men who had escaped from the Gaol on Sunday night, he was immediately rescued.

September 13th 1842

Fire was caused by the tempest on Wednesday evening at Chilton Hall near Sudbury the property of W.Windham and occupied by H.Meeking, flames extended to the new bullock shed and to the barn where 150 coombs of threshed wheat and about 360 coombs of unthreshed barley was destroyed.
Lightning also struck a house at Foxearth called West-End Hall, belonging to Dr Clopton's Asylum and lately occupied by Mr Adams, deceased, it shattered a window and part of the wall, the mantlepiece was forced from the chimney. The only persons in the house were the Steward and a servant who usually occupied the room during a tempest on account of an iron bar attached to the chimney of the other room but they providentially left it just before the shocking occasion.

September 14th 1842

Bulmer Tye Farm to be sold on instruction from John Viall who is quitting farming. Catalogues from Mr Hurrel's offices in Sudbury and at Brundon Hall.

September 14th 1842

Messrs Isaacson and Tattersall have received instructions from the executors of the late Mr Adams to offer for sale at Foxearth on the premises. Household furniture-12 horses-12 North Wales bullocks-80 two shear Down wethers-6 sows-boar-29 shoats-2 road waggons-2 harvest waggons-6 tumbrils-5 Newman ploughs and usual implements.

September 14th 1842

To be sold at Houghton Hall, Cavendish. The valuable farming stock of William Rose who is quitting occupancy. 20 horses-2 road waggons-4 harvest waggons-4 tumbrils-3 small waggons-two horse drill-2 rolls-7 iron breasted ploughs-6 wooden breasted ploughs-3 double ploughs-strong crab harrows-14 counter drill-land drain plough-wheel chaff cutter engine-oil cake crusher-bean mill-harness.

September 20th 1842

Death-on Wednesday last in her 83 year Sarah, relict of Samuel Garrett of Foxearth and late of Rowhedge farm, Shimpling.
September 27th 1842. On Friday last, fire broke out in a cottage belonging to Peter Firmin, blacksmith, of Bulmer, when in a short time it consumed the same entirely.

October 4th 1842

Wheat at Bury Market-red to 52s-white to 58s- barley, malting to 30s-grinding to 26s.

November 1st 1842

A ewe was stolen from the farm of Joseph Eaton Hale of Somerton, it was killed and flayed at some distance, on the following morning a portion of the carcase was found including the skin and marks were seen from which it is believed three persons were implicated.

November 1st 1842

Annual sale of underwood on the Melford Hall Estate-- to be sold by auction the underwood in Spelthorn and Hennage Wood, 12-14 years growth also 2 large haystacks the property of Sir Hyde Parker.
Also the underwood upon Acton Race, Cavendish and Bulmer estates of Earl Howe.

November 8th 1842

An apple called American Pippin fell from a tree belonging to Mr Levett of Pebmarsh which weighed 22© ozs and measured 15" circumference, there are several more larger ones in the tree.

November 8th 1842

The live and dead stock at White House Farm, Otten Belchamp for sale, the property of Mr Pung who has let the farm. 7 horses-2 cows etc.

November 23rd 1842.

South Suffolk show took place in a paddock belonging to Mr Parsons adjoining Friars Street, the ploughing took place at Wood Hall. 65 ploughs took part, the judges were Mr Went from Melford and Mr Ellams from Foxearth. Best stallion-Mr J.Orbell from Brook. Hall Foxearth; Best 2 year old gelding-Mr Richard Aldham of Foxearth Hall. Wheel plough-best ploughman any age-Edward Springett who works for Xr William Taylor of Gt.Cornard 2 10s. 2nd prize to William Griggs for William Sparrow of Newton 2. In the second class William Manning first prize for Mr George Death of Long Melford. 2nd Thomas Coe for Mr William Jennings of Rodbridge. 3rd Edward Brunning for William Taylor of Gt.Cornard. Best ploughboy under 20 years-First, Edward Collins for Henry Siggers of Gt Cornard. 2nd Samuel Humm for Edward Cooke of Henny. 3rd JameS Clarke for Charles Deeks of Hundon. Labourer with most children brought up without parish relieve-Ewin Johnson of St Peters, Sudbury with ten children. Labourer longest time on the same farm-William Hartley of Ballingdon,57 years. 2nd Samuel Stiff of Reydon 47 years, 2 for each.

November 23rd 1842.

William Mattham landlord of Lavenham Black. Lion, Noah Must a horse dealer of Sudbury, John Chinney, Martin Stearn and William Gurling, all butchers of Lavenham, Isaac Scarfe, Fred Stock, William Snell and William Duce all of Lavenham were summoned to answer a charge by Henry Thomas, secretary of the Society for the prevention of cruelty to animals, charging them with on November 5th at Washmere Green, Lavenham, that they did use a certain ground for bull baiting. John Smith said he went to Washmere Green at 12 o'clock on November 5th where a great many people were assembled, at between 3 and 4 a bull was brought from the direction of Lavenham and several persons fixed a rope to its horns, they then led it to a stake fixed in the ground where a collar was put round its neck and the rope taken from its horns, then by noise and other means the bull was irritated to make it wild, Carter being the most active in this, he also collected money from the spectators. Stearn had a dog which he set on the bull which it bit and several times, the dog was tossed in the air and severely injured. Gurling, Chinney and Ransom had dogs which they also set on the bull, Mattham was on horse back. and appeared to direct the proceedings. The bull was baited for about an hour and was torn about the face and nose, several of the dogs were much injured and bled a great deal. There were about 200 people present during the baiting with great uproar and filthy language being used. Mattham, Must, Ransom, Chinney and Carter were fined 5 each. Gurling 20s. Hughes, Snell, Stock, Scarfe and Duce were fined 10s. Mattham, Must, Stearn,Gurling and Duce paid their fines, the rest were committed to prison for 2 months hard labour, the prosecution gave the fines to Lavenham National school.

December 6th 1842

The great annual stock fair came off on Thursday at Bury. Sol had scarcely peeped over the eastern hills before the noise of the drovers and their dogs and cracking of whips rebounded through the atmosphere of the surrounding district announcing, the approach of an immense multitude. The market was held on the cricket field, little business was done however as Sir Robert Peel and his new tariff completely paralysed the energy of the graziers and agriculturists.

December 21st 1842

Sale of timber at Melford. Alder poles and faggot wood at Royden Queech near the Lodge Farm.

December 21st 1842

Under the execution of the Sheriff of Suffolk-the effects of John Fakes, a waggoner of Melford-11 wain horses-1 heavy waggon-2 light waggons-5 carts and house-hold furniture.

December 21st 1842

Mr Braithwaite, engineer to the Eastern Counties Railway has been appointed to the same office with the Northern and Eastern line.

December 21st 1842

At Halstead on Monday, an infant aged two years was left in charge of it's brother, Joseph Harrington, aged ?, it contrived to light a piece of paper by which it's clothing caught fire, it was so badly burned that it died the same day.

December 21st 1842

A cattle cabbage was cut at Boxted Hall which weighed 25 lbs.

December 21st 1842

Notice is hereby given to creditors of Mr Rose, late of Houghton Hall, Cavendish.that an instalment of ten shillings in the pound will be paid on account of their demand at the Half Moon Inn at Clare on the 2nd of January 1843

Signed John Purkiss and J.Gannet.

December 21st 1842

January 4th 1843

The Red Barn at Polstead which was the scene of the murder of Maria Marten and had attracted much attention exists no longer. On the spot where the barn stood another crime has been committed adding to the foul stain of murder, that of arson. On Monday evening at about 7-30 on the 26th inst, flames were seen issuing out of the bullock shed adjoining the barn, two cottages at the bottom of the hill were saved by the considerable efforts of a large body of men, some of whom stood on the roof and threw burning embers off as they lodged upon it also applying wet blankets taken from the poor cottagers beds.
Not a vestige of the barn was left only the foundations, this is the second barn to have been destroyed on this spot, about 80 coombs of barley belonging to Mr Tabor the tenant was destroyed together with some unthreshed grain. The owner, Mr Charles Tyrell of Polstead Hall was insured, it is the belief the fire emanated from arson. It is a remarkable coincidence that on the same day of the fire the other monument of the crime of the Red Barn was removed from the public eye at the Suffolk Hospital at Bury, the committee of the hospital resolved to discontinue the exhibition of Corder's skeleton except for anatomical purposes.

January 4th 1843

Inq--at Ballingdon King's Head on Samuel Foaker aged 13, in the forenoon of the same day the father of the boy and driver of a cart laden with lime were geasing the wheels, for that purpose had placed a prop under the shafts but the weight of the lime preponderating to the back of the cart caused it to fall backwards onto the deceased.

January 4th 1843

The second Annual Ball of the Melford Assembly to be held at the Bull Inn at Melford on Tuesday the 10th. Admission=Gentlemen 10s--Ladies 7s 6d, tea nad supper included. Signed N.C.Barnardiston and J.Poley, Stewards.

January 10th 1843

Robbery at Lavenham. On the 21st ult, Three men entered the warehouse of Mr Bobby at Lavenham, having opened it with a false key, Mr Bobby being on watch through a small hole he had made in the wall, went out with his man and secured the door by which they entered, his man fired off a pistol to call neighbours for assistance, Mr Bobby having previously been robbed of a large quantity of sugar, he threatened to shoot the first man who tried to escape but before help arrived they forced another large door open and one of them struck Mr Bobby with a bludgeon who fired at one of them, the ball striking the opposite wall so low that it impossible it passed near his head, the fellow was secured and another has since been taken at Hedingham, the 3rd, William Smith has absconded. The parties committed were Charles Rust and Thomas Bareham from Waldingfield, Rust is servant to Bareham.

January 10th 1843

J.C.Fake of the old established Waggon Office at Melford wishes to inform his customers in consequence of his affliction (being quite blind) added to his other circunstances has relinquished his business to his mother Mrs Honour Fakes who will carry on the business. During the winter the waggon will leave Long Melford every Thursday at 6 in the evening and arrive at the Blue Boar, Aldgate, at 4 on the morning of Saturday and return on Monday.

January 24th 1843

Married at Walter Belchamp--Mr J.Mason of Sudbury to Eliza the only daughter of Mr Jonathan Fisher the miller.

January 24th 1843

At about 7 on Thursday last evening as Mr Mortlock a farmer of Hawkedon was returning from Sudbury market, within one mile of home two men sprang out of the side of the road and grabbed his bridle and one of his feet with a design to unhorse him but he gave them a sound beating with his riding stick and struggled to rescue himself, in his flight they threw after him a club which missed and a boy found it next morning.

January 31st 1843

Caution---Reading In Bed. A few nights since, a servant of Mr Paul, a chemist of Halstead was reading in bed with a candle, she fell asleep and set fire to the bed, Miss Paul smelt the fire and went to the domestic's room where they managed to put the flames out.

January 31st 1843

About a dozen paupers at the Union House in Bury were charged by Mr Legge with refusing to work. Mr Legge stated that they came off the tread mill at 1 o' clock and refused to go back on again alleging weakness occasioned by an insufficient diet, on Tuesday and Wednesday they refused again to work saying they had three cold dinners a week and thought it hard that they were put to felons work because they were poor. The Bench considered the case and sentenced four in number to 21 days, they were Burton, Gurney, Basildo and Imp.

February 7th 1843

The committee of the proposed navigation from Clare to Sudbury met in the Half Moon Inn at Clare to report on progress in obtaining public money on subscription for defraying expences of Mr Cubbit the engineer who is making the survey, taking levels and the amount of expenditure required to carry the same into effect.

February 7th 1843

A Bill for the disfranchisement of the Borough of Sudbury was read for the first time in the House of Commons, the 2nd reading is fixed for the 20th inst.

February 7th 1843

9 convicts were removed to the Leviathan Hulk at Portsmouth, among them was William Rust.

March 15th 1843

Robert Brown was charged with stealing in September last, a scythe and thowless, the property of Jeremiah Wordley at Cavendish.

March 15th 1843

On Thursday last, fire broke out in a cottage at Cavendish and was not extingushed until the adjoining cottages were entirely burnt out and Brockwell's much damaged.

March 21st 1843

At Suffolk Sessions, William Smith a carter of Mildenhall was charged with entering the warehouse of Mr Bobby at Lavenham and stealing two quantities of sugar, two persons, Rust and Beer were tried at the last Sessions, Beer was acquitted and Rust sentenced to 10 years transportaion, Smith was not apprehended until the 2nd inst when he was found concealed at Lt Waldingfield. 7 years transportation.

March 21st 1843

John Middleditch and James Brown were indicted for breaking into the house of John Andrews, a beerhouse keeper of Glemsford and stealing two hams, a loin of pork, 25 lbs of pickled pork and copper coins including 19 farthings. Outside the house there were drips of blood which were tracked in the snow by two constables to the house of Brown at Finsted End, a distance of two miles, similar footsteps were found in Brown's garden and at the back of the house the property was found in a haulm stack. The shoes were taken off the prisoner and patternized in the snow and were found to correspond with prints found in the snow, one of Brown's fingers was found to have been cut on the door latch and there were spots of blood on his clothes, 19 farthings were in his pockets.
Middleditch was acquitted and Brown was sentenced to 10 years transportation.

March 21st 1843

Robert Brown of Cavendish aged 62 years was convicted for stealing a scythe at Cavendish but was recommended for mercy because of his age. 1 month.

March 21st 1843

John and William Pearson aged 13 and 15, for stealing a brass dial plate at Ixworth the property of Lord Harvey. 6 weeks and to be well whipped.

March 21st 1843

James Fenner a shoemaker at Melford, for stealing a mackintosh and a great coat from William Campling at Melford and two boots the property of Peter Perry at Sudbury. 7 years transportation.

March 21st 1843

William Oakley a labourer of Glemsford was charged with stealing a quantity of potatoes from a field in Glemsford. 12 months.

March 21st 1843

No prosecutor appeared in the case of Charles Chatres of Cavendish who was charged with embezzling 10s he had received in exchange for a pony he had been employed to sell for William Hasel of Cavendish.

March 21st 1843

The corn laws have again been agitated in Parliament with no other result than an negative, the Minister will do the business in his own way and time.
March 28th 1843, Zacariah Gooday and Joseph Brown were charged with stealing 12 pecks of potatoes from a clamp of Ambrose Shepherd at Glemsford.
March 28th 1843, Suffolk Lent Assizes. Wayman v Buston. This was an undefended case brought by Mr Wayman a solicitor of Bury against a farmer at Wickhambrook. Mr Wayman to receive £ 61 15s 6d, the amount of duty on two lots of property purchased at Lidgate.

April 11th 1843

On Saturday morning last fire broke out at Place Farm in Hartest the property of George Weller Poley and in occupation of the executors of the late Mr Harvey. It is supposed to have originated in a large barn or a straw rick, before the livestock could be released, one poor horse was stifled and another two were scorched but other horses and pigs escaped, the poultry were all burnt to death. The dwelling house was saved, the farm is situated at the enterance to the Green, two other thatched cottages were destroyed, the engines from Chadacre and Lawshall attended, the fire is believed to have been started maliciously.

April 11th 1843

Committed to Bury gaol, Edward Molton charged with stealing an elm slab from William Beeton at Glemsford.

April 25th 1843

Charles and John Theobald were charged with setting fire to buildings belonging to George Weller Poley at Boxted also corn in the straw and 2 mares, two sows and two pigs belonging to John Smith.

April 25th 1843

Sudbury Union--Wanted a school mistress at a salary of £ 20 per annum with board, lodgings and washing.

April 25th 1843

William Hartley aged 16 had served a sentence at Bury gaol but was unable to leave because of an illness. The Governor said he was committed by R.Maplecroft. Natural death from maliganant fever but the jury were of the opinion that Mr Hubbard the surgeon had been unattentive to the deceased.

May 3rd 1843

It is reported to us that in America an excavator driven by steam has been working on the railway lines and can perform in a day the work of 100 men, it is reported that such a machine has arrived in this country and is at work near Brentwood.

June 1st 1843

The question of the corn laws was the powerful speech by Lord Dulcie, who is a corn law repealer, in the Lords this week. We have already given our view on the sliding scale of duty which is 1s on Canadian wheat and 4s on American.

June 1st 1843

To be sold at the Half Moon in Clare--3 cottages and a tenement on Borley Green-Lot 2, Arable land on Borley Common, 2 acres 2 rods 9 perches. Lot 2- pieces of Common Meadow-1 rod 16 perches.

June 1st 1843

Also at the Half Moon-245 acres, a desirable estate at Ridgewell called Ridgewell Hill and Green Farm, good roomy farmhouse and 4 workmen's cottages.

June 13th 1843

In consequence of the depredations made on the common lands at Sudbury by 19-20 geese or goslings, orders have been given to one of the Town Rangers to succeed in placing them in the pound, the lady to whom they belonged, so strong was their affection manifested on her by her feathered friends she accompanied them to the pound and expressed to share with them the rigours of imprisonment and which she entered. The Ranger reported to the Mayor and the lady gave liberty to the captives by throwing them over the fence but with the laughs and jokes from without she could not bear any longer and the Ranger who lives nearby and whose gallantry would not allow him to witness a tender female excluded from society, she was released. It is said she will be prosecuted.

June 28th 1843

The bridge in the the town of Sudbury from Suffolk to Essex has been for some time in a dilapidated condition, absolutely dangerous to the public from the timbers and planks being near rotten, the latter so much that in some parts of the Essex end they have fallen in and nothing but a covering of chalk and stone remains for support to the heavy laden carriages so often passing over the bridge.
This has been reported to the Essex magistrates, they immediately ordered thorough reparations of the half of the bridge belonging to that county, the expence will be, it is supposed, amounting to nearly 300 pounds. After reparations to the Essex side it was deemed necessary to have an inspection of the Suffolk side and three members of the Town Council were appointed to inspect and report on it's state and cost of probable repairs. It seems from the external that the timbers and planks are not so bad as the Essex side and that 30 pounds would cover the expence, the work was ordered to be carried out but on removal of the coats of chalk and stones the timbers and planks were found as bad if not worse than the other end and after another meeting it was reported that 100 to 150 pounds would be required to completely repair it. We are inclined to believe it would cost more as some of the piles are in the same state. By the Editor---The expence is to fall on the Borough of Sudbury, the bridge is altogether a disgrace to the two counties and it is greatly deplored that 5 to 600 pounds should be expended in repairing a structure of planks and open rails.

July 3rd 1843

Red Wheat at Bury Market to 49s-- White to 52s-Malting barley-to 35s-Oats to 25s.

July 12th 1843

There are great acts of wanton mischief in Sudbury and district such as breaking lamps and windows, one offender has been captured by Henry Tiffen, a solicitor of Sudbury who placed, himself to view the Bank buildings. Mr Tiffin went up to two of the offenders who he knew and they made off, Mr Tiffin followed and detained one who is now in gaol, he is an engraver, the other is the son of clergyman. Calvert was fined £ 2 1s.

July 12th 1843

At Suffolk Sessions. Joseph Frost and Edward Sewell, labourers of Hitcham, were charged with stealing two lambs from Joseph Wright a labourer of Chelsworth. The prosecutor said he heard a noise in the night of sheep in distress and got up, finding the shed door open he found two lambs had been taken from the ewe, in the morning he found two skins and blood which was traced several fields to Frost's cottage and found blood stains on Frost's clothes, at Sewells he found a carcase of a lamb. Frost 10 years transportation=Sewell for life.

July 12th 1843

William Bruty of Stoke by Clare for stealing on two occasions, beer from the cellar of John Jardine of Stoke. 3 months hard labour.

July 12th 1843

George Whittle for stealing 4 plough shares from Daniel Mills at Melford, 3 months. John Border for receiving the same. 2 years

July 12th 1843

Last winter the writer of this article saw within a few miles of Lewes in Sussex, 5 pairs of oxen yoked to one plough and driven by 2 men and a boy.

August 8th 1843

A most awful visitation occurred on Friday afternoon as William Jennings of Rodbridge farm, Melford, was going to church, after passing Hall Mill Bridge a few yards, he fell down and instantly expired, a medical man was nearby but the vital spark had fled, the body was taken to the Bull Inn for the inquest. Deceased was a gentleman of ample means and was a liberal benefactor to the poor. He was 62 years of age.

August 8th 1843

In the House of Commons on Tuesday night the Sudbury Disfranchisement Bill was again discussed, Sir Robert Peel thought it was impossible to believe that Sudbury electors were not bribed but the bill had failed in the Lords, the House was not satisfied, with that the House divided for a writ being issued. For a bill being issued 25, against 138.

August 8th 1843

On Saturday afternoon, as the driver of a waggon was returning from Sudbury to Borley, on going down Barfield Hill by some means the wheels passed over him but he had sufficient strength to rise and get in the waggon and the horse conveyed him to his master's, but he had received injuries causing his death in a short time after his return.

August 16th 1843

Suffolk Assizes---Charles and John Theobald were charged with setting fire to a farm belonging to John Smith at Boxted on the 14th of April. It appears that the thatch on the cowhouse which was no more than 5ft from the ground was set on fire by the prisoners, Charles had left Mr Smith's employment saying the reason was he was unable to do the work, an old woman of Somerton met them on Good Friday and heard them say they would like to see a fire on the hill, a shopkeeper named Sarcer said Charles Theobald had bought a packet of lucifer matches. Walter Bullock with whom Charles slept was called upon to prove his ansence from bed. Not guilty.
Out of the 63 prisoners tried only 11 were able to read and write.

August 22nd 1843

Died on Sunday last at the great age of 100 years 7 months, Mrs Nelson of Bulmer Street near Sudbury.

August 29th 1843

At Worship Street Police Office, London, 3 men were charged with entering the house of William Spelling at Melford and stealing a quantity of property valued at 70 pounds. They were Joseph Francis, John Wallis and James Pearce. George Green, constable of Melford said that on examining the premises he observed footmarks of 3 men which he traced from the warehouse to the Eastern Counties Railway at Melford, upon inquiry he ascerted that a large parcel had been received and directed to Mr Johnson and to be left at the terminus to be collected. Committed for trial.

September 16th 1843

Death at Belchamp Walter of Mr Jonathan Firmin, miller and malster aged 76 years.

September 16th 1843

There was an accident at Sible Hedingham on Wednesday, Mr Dalliston the Baptist Minister left home to procure a gig to drive out Mrs Dalliston with the intention of bathing in the river, in the afternoon his clothes were found on the bank and he was found drowned. Accidental Death.

September 12th 1843

Died at Belchamp Walter in his 76th year, Mr Jonathon Fisher, miller and malster of belchamp Walter.

September 13th 1843

Live and dead stock to be sold at Pauls Hall Belchamp St Pauls the property of the Edward Ewer who is qiting the farm.

October 3rd 1843

A Private of the Scot's Greys underwent a terrible and disgraceful punishment, being flogged at the barracks riding school a few days since, the unfortunate man was an Irishman named Dogherty who threatened to shoot his Corporal, he received 140 lashes without a groan or cry, he was afterwards conveyed to the hospital.

October 3rd 1843

Capital Windmill to be let at Middleton near Sudbury with round house, Shifting tackle and Millers house

October 31st 1843

John and William Smith, labourers of Lavenham for having stolen on the highway between Lavenham and Preston from John Mills, a silver watch. Both 10 years transportation.

November 7th 1843

A meeting was held at Lavenham of inhabitants to consult what steps had been taken with a view to promote extensions of the railway by Hadleigh, Lavenham to Bury.

August 7th 1843

Inqu-- at Bures St Mary on James Frost, horsekeeper to Thomas Hawkins of Assington who was sent with a waggon and another man in charge of a load of corn to Bures, not returning, his master went to look for them and he found the waggon without a driver and deceased lying beside the road, the wheels having crushed his head and the other man further behind quite drunk. Accidental

November 21st 1843

Joseph Durrant pleaded guilty to taking a partridge out of a hingle at Risby. Fined 5 pounds.

November 21st 1843

On Thursday night at about 12-1, three men entered the house of Stephen Pearsons, a small farmer of Stradishall, by cuting a hole in the wall, they went up to the bedroom and demanded money, the wife cried out " murder" the men struck a broom stick in her mouth and beat her severely, they took 13 pounds, the poor woman was so alarmed that she jumped out of window and hid in the pig stye, we hear one man has been detained.

December 12th 1843

On Sunday evening, a young man, a hawker, slept at the Crown Inn, Hundon, near Clare, after his departure it was discovered in the room where he slept that a box was broken open and an old guinea and other articles were taken therefrom, he was taken into custody at the Fox Inn at Ousden with the money etc.

December 19th 1843

On Thursday night between 9 and 10 a fire broke out on an off-hand farm at Glemsford belonging to Ambrose Shepperd of Glemsford and his own occupation by which is a double tenement with a stack near, double barn, 2 cartsheds, produce of 11 acres of wheat, 9 acres of barley, 10-11 acres of peas and beans, waggon and various implements were destroyed, the livestock were got out uninjured. About a week ago an outhouse at Glemsford Cock in occupation of Mr Shepperd's son was burnt but was believed an accident. Mr Sheppherd bears an excellent character as a kind and humane master.

December 19th 1843

On Saturday night the house of poor widow named Clark was broken into on the Croft at Sudbury and was entered, four fine ducks were stolen, the heartless wretches added affliction to the poor woman who had a daughter lying dead in another room in the same part of the house, she has 7 other children to lament with her.

December 19th 1843

Some fine specimens of Ausralian wheat has arrived in the country, it is equivalent if not superior than our own best white wheat. The lot we have seen cost 35s a quarter at Hobart, shipping amounted to 10-12s a quarter, duty 5s, so it cost after import to England 58-60s a quarter in London or Liverpool so it will leave a fair profit for the importer. It is the result of an abundance of wheat in Hobart.

December 26th 1843

At out poultry market in Bury all was cleared by 4 o'clock--cock turkeys, 9-10p a pound, hen turkeys 1s a lb--geese 6-10p a pound-ducks 3s to 5s each-chickens, 2s 6d to 3s each-pheasants 6s to 7s a brace-hares 2s 6d to 4s a head.

December 26th 1843

As Mr Duffield of Bungay, a veterinary surgeon was returning from Thwaite at about 2 a.m. on Wednesday, when he came to a hill near Belsey Bridge, his mare appeared alarmed and tetchy, Mr Duffield suspecting something amiss looked ahead and having good lamps distinctly saw a rope drawn or lying across the road at about 50 yards before him, on coming up, the mare leapt over and the gig crossed the rope and escaped uninjured. Mr Duffield has no doubt he saw movement in the hedge but he thinks the men knew the trot of his mare and dropped the rope as he came up not wishing to attack him.